Post Reply The Disastrous Life of Saiki K. Manga Creator Says He Receives No Profit From Anime
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Posted 9/5/17 , edited 9/5/17

The Disastrous Life of Saiki K. manga creator Shūichi Asō revealed on Twitter last week that although he is the creator of a franchise that now includes anime, an upcoming live-action film, games, novels, and various merchandise, he has not profited from the story spreading into other media.


https://www.animenewsnetwork.cc/interest/2017-09-04/the-disastrous-life-of-saiki-k-manga-creator-says-he-receives-no-profit-from-anime/.120837

I'm not sure if this is typical throughout the manga industry but I think this creator has it pretty rough. Watching everyone make decisions and profit from your ideas. You hear the bigger guys like Oda and Toriyama being really involved with their works, even when they jump mediums.
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Posted 9/5/17 , edited 9/5/17
Honestly? Never do good work for free, even if it is for "exposure". This may have worked in some way for him, but I find it incredibly odd that in the most likely scenario, they went to him to produce the anime and expand the franchise, and he does not get any compensation. Jeez.
Posted 9/5/17 , edited 9/5/17
The lesson here is: Read your contracts before you sign them. Complaining afterwards is pointless.
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Posted 9/5/17 , edited 9/5/17
Isn't this common with every mangaka? I remember reading an article on this site about the Gintama mangaka barley making anything from the anime.
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Posted 9/5/17 , edited 9/5/17

Okocha119 wrote:

The lesson here is: Read your contracts before you sign them. Complaining afterwards is pointless.


I would not be surprised if he was pressured into it, which still applies the same idea of complaint you mentioned; though I have little idea to how Japanese society operates, this mesh of corporate and social pressure may have got to him. Quite sad, really.


It may be possible they are just offputting his payment, which is how some corporations and parts of the government operate here in the US.
Posted 9/5/17 , edited 9/5/17

PeripheralVisionary wrote:

I would not be surprised if he was pressured into it


He most likely wouldn't have gotten signed at all if he didn't agree to things like this. It's been said multiple times how incredibly competitive the manga industry is, so creators unfortunately don't have much room to bargain. Still, the contract is what it is and complaining now won't change that.

If I happen to be wrong and he actually does have a legit claim to profits from the anime or merchandise sales, which they are withholding from him, then he has every right to sue. That people in Japan are less likely to do that than those in the US due to social conventions is certainly true, but that's another discussion entirely and either way, I don't think that whining on twitter is very helpful in that regard.
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Posted 9/5/17 , edited 9/5/17

Okocha119
If I happen to be wrong and he actually does have a legit claim to profits from the anime or merchandise sales, which they are withholding from him, then he has every right to sue. That people in Japan are less likely to do that than those in the US due to social conventions is certainly true, but that's another discussion entirely and either way, I don't think that whining on twitter is very helpful in that regard.


I doubt they even made a profit with the ~4,100 copies they sold.
Posted 9/5/17 , edited 9/5/17

srlan23 wrote:

I doubt they even made a profit with the ~4,100 copies they sold.


4,360 according to someanithing I wouldn't necessarily say that. Disc sales are far from everything, plus the show was clearly made on a rather tight budget. But neither me nor you know the numbers, so I don't think that it's our place to speculate.

I mean the foremost point of an anime adaptation is to boost the sales of the source material, which it apparently did.
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Posted 9/5/17 , edited 9/5/17

Okocha119 wrote:


PeripheralVisionary wrote:

I would not be surprised if he was pressured into it


He most likely wouldn't have gotten signed at all if he didn't agree to things like this. It's been said multiple times how incredibly competitive the manga industry is, so creators unfortunately don't have much room to bargain. Still, the contract is what it is and complaining now won't change that.

If I happen to be wrong and he actually does have a legit claim to profits from the anime or merchandise sales, which they are withholding from him, then he has every right to sue. That people in Japan are less likely to do that than those in the US due to social conventions is certainly true, but that's another discussion entirely and either way, I don't think that whining on twitter is very helpful in that regard.


True, though as for whining, I think he was answering a question more or less, whereas he admit overall that it did increase manga sales, which seems to be the point for most anime it seems. Contracts are contracts though.
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Posted 9/5/17 , edited 9/5/17

Okocha119 wrote:


srlan23 wrote:

I doubt they even made a profit with the ~4,100 copies they sold.


4,360 according to someanithing I wouldn't necessarily say that. Disc sales are far from everything, plus the show was clearly made on a rather tight budget. But neither me nor you know the numbers, so I don't think that it's our place to speculate.

I mean the foremost point of an anime adaptation is to boost the sales of the source material, which it apparently did.


I got the number from someanithing . But I looked "Per-volume Sales by Year" list. I didn't realize the "Average Sales by Year" list is more accurate. Now I know .
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Posted 9/5/17 , edited 9/6/17
Well, that's not surprising to here. After all, there have been quite a number of articles written about this about how anime is essentially volunteer work and that only guys like Akira Toriyama and Eiichiro Oda actually make money. In any case, it just goes to show how desperate for money they are, but at the very least it's starting to get wider recognition than before seeing that Amazon and Netflix are now a huge source of revenue, while in the old days they can only get peanuts from places that are dedicated to the anime culture. Even so, that only applies to a small proportion of the industry while many struggle on with only their passion driving them.
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