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Post Reply 143 million records leaked out of Equifax, a U.S. credit reporting firm
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Posted 9/10/17 , edited 9/12/17
I like how CR put it

I can confirm that through Experian-- when you put a fraud alert on your credit report they will allow you to access your report for free (so every 90 days!) Equifax will not allow it though from what i noticed...

https://www.consumerreports.org/equifax/how-to-lock-down-your-money-after-the-equifax-breach/


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Posted 9/10/17 , edited 9/12/17
I can't help it, I have to run with this: the Russians did it! alright that's out my system and out of the way... it's sort of a disappointment, oh wait, it gets better, this is the government, this is the new normal. in all honesty I'm not really surprised by it, it was bound to happen, would have been nice to be later than sooner... thanks to this release how many are laughing about our credit information...

in all honesty, something similar happened when people were forced to sign up for obamafail, there is nothing affordable and nor is it a law, nor an act, it's a failed law passed by obama, own up to it. with that aside, all that data breach, all the same thing with these folks as well. good to know the government data mines and protects their stuff far greater than sites that really should protect their stuff.

probably happened before and probably will happen further and more, hacking is much easier, especially if you aren't doing enough security on the site to begin with. there should be better laws put into place regarding cyber criminals and easier ways to find them. stop figuring out the purpose of a shrimp on a treadmill and please work on making my data safer. let's not forget those chips in your cards are easier to hack and that RFID chip is hack able as well. there was a hacking to previous medical records as well a few years back when they were forced to digitize.

in the end I wait for that piece of mail I suppose, what else is there to do. I have a feeling "they" have gotten my data so much it's not even funny any more. I don't have much to grab, so when I get that check in the mail out of sympathy from some stranger, then I know for a fact I was breached, because I have a thin file, there's nothing in there. thank you credit karma!
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Posted 9/10/17 , edited 9/12/17

bemused_Bohemian wrote:

My email name got pwned via Funimation last year. Been changing passwords right & left since. So far, so good.


I'm also got hit by the Funimation email , my spam folder has been overloaded since . Now , I got hit with this crap too ... It didn't affect my wife or my sons , just me . I feel so special .
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Posted 9/11/17 , edited 9/12/17

niotabunny wrote:

I can't help it, I have to run with this: the Russians did it! alright that's out my system and out of the way... it's sort of a disappointment, oh wait, it gets better, this is the government, this is the new normal. in all honesty I'm not really surprised by it, it was bound to happen, would have been nice to be later than sooner... thanks to this release how many are laughing about our credit information...

in all honesty, something similar happened when people were forced to sign up for obamafail, there is nothing affordable and nor is it a law, nor an act, it's a failed law passed by obama, own up to it. with that aside, all that data breach, all the same thing with these folks as well. good to know the government data mines and protects their stuff far greater than sites that really should protect their stuff.

probably happened before and probably will happen further and more, hacking is much easier, especially if you aren't doing enough security on the site to begin with. there should be better laws put into place regarding cyber criminals and easier ways to find them. stop figuring out the purpose of a shrimp on a treadmill and please work on making my data safer. let's not forget those chips in your cards are easier to hack and that RFID chip is hack able as well. there was a hacking to previous medical records as well a few years back when they were forced to digitize.

in the end I wait for that piece of mail I suppose, what else is there to do. I have a feeling "they" have gotten my data so much it's not even funny any more. I don't have much to grab, so when I get that check in the mail out of sympathy from some stranger, then I know for a fact I was breached, because I have a thin file, there's nothing in there. thank you credit karma!


You are sorely misinformed. Credit reporting bureaus are NOT run by the government, in fact they have are barely even regulated by the government, which is a problem since these days your credit score can effect your life in numerous ways. They are publicly traded companies, which is part of the reason why some of the higher ups at Equifax are looking at possible jail time and stiff fines for securities fraud (Selling off their shares based on information that will negatively impact the company that hasn't been divulged to the public yet)
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Posted 9/11/17 , edited 9/12/17


CR is correct. You have the right to access your credit report after you placed a fraud alert on your account. Equifax charging people for a credit freeze or not allowing them to access their credit reports after this hack is just plain stupid. The last thing you want to force victims of your negligence to pay up in this case.

The fraud alert will not do much in prevent identify theft though. I would also check for fraudulent transactions on your credit cards as well, you might have call in to close down the current cards and request new cards-with new numbers.
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Posted 9/12/17 , edited 9/12/17

dulun18 wrote:




DO NOT ENROLL in their credit monitoring service-- you are waiving your right in the up coming class action lawsuit



Equifax is running a racket here and what they're doing should be illegal (but it's not)... There should be a clear notice of waiving of right to sue ABOVE the signup button and not hiding behind a vague "oh looksee there might be some additional info here" link.
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Posted 9/12/17 , edited 9/13/17
The action lawsuits started (more than one now). I read an article about this page

It looks fishy to me though

https://donotpay-search-master.herokuapp.com/


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Posted 9/13/17 , edited 9/14/17
This also affects the UK but Equifax aren't talking and their system to check if you are affected assumes that you have a US social security number.

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-41257580


Also their Argentine operation had confidential data stored behind a username of "admin" and a password of "admin." Who do these people employ to run their security?

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-41257576
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Posted 9/13/17 , edited 9/14/17

MidoriNoTora
Also their Argentine operation had confidential data stored behind a username of "admin" and a password of "admin." Who do these people employ to run their security?

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-41257576


Should have gone with the much harder combination of "admin" and "password." Nobody would have been able to crack that one.
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Posted 9/14/17 , edited 9/14/17
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Posted 9/14/17 , edited 9/14/17

dulun18 wrote:
anyone here changed their social security number before ?


This is rather extreme, even given the context of the situation with Equifax.
The best solution is one that most people who understand how easily your credit can become compromised end up using in their day to day life: simply freeze your credit.
I keep my credit frozen unless I am applying for a new position that runs a full background check (including a soft inquiry to credit bureaus) or if I plan on applying for some sort of loan, credit card, or credit limit increase.

American Express gives me the opportunity to raise my credit limit every 91 days.
About 7-10 days before I apply for this increase (can be applied for after 91 days, of course), I unfreeze my credit and set up any alerts of changes through Credit Karma's mobile app.
I put in the application after my credit has been unfrozen for 7 days (sometimes it takes 7-10 business days to show to potential inquiries).
I get approved, freeze it again the next day. Repeat.

My AMEX has a $55,000 CL.
I've been doing this for about 4-5 years with different credit cards or loans.
The challenge is to plan for these increases and/or you should be fully aware as to when you are headed to a bank or car dealership.
Ample enough time for your credit report to be accessible to these would-be creditors.

I have had a friend who changed his Social Security number.
He had quite a folder of documents outlining exactly how he was impacted by an identity theft event.
His credit score shot down, he couldn't remortgage his house (he lost it) and his savings account was wiped out due to creditors putting claims against him.
After squaring it all away (minus house), he had his Social Security number changed.
It took around 6-8 months for it to go through, as far as I recall.
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Posted 9/15/17 , edited 9/15/17
there's a petition that you can sign

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Posted 9/17/17 , edited 9/17/17
i got letters from Experian and Transunion about my fraud alert. It looks like you can request the fraud alert every 60 days

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Posted 9/17/17 , edited 9/17/17

AnimeAddictANN69 wrote:

there's a petition that you can sign



Is this on Change.org?

Aaaaaand the thing that really irked me about this mess is the fact that the hacker got in so easy. Literal username and password used for the hack: Admin; password: Admin. Don't believe me? Forbes wrote an article on it.
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Posted 9/18/17 , edited 9/18/17

nonspecificscientific wrote:


Is this on Change.org?

Aaaaaand the thing that really irked me about this mess is the fact that the hacker got in so easy. Literal username and password used for the hack: Admin; password: Admin. Don't believe me? Forbes wrote an article on it.


It was an email i got from consumers union

https://consumersunion.org/equifax/
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