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Post Reply Why is there copyright?
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Posted 9/17/17 , edited 9/17/17
Hmm, I think it is about broadcasting rights and its inheritance. The thing is how do you get this broadcasting right and whether this impact would be of good/bad significance. By all mean if the industry is losing money because of this, don't do it, just personal use


NeofluxProductions wrote:


fredreload wrote:

P.S You are right, it is still best to ask the studio for streaming rights. How do Crunchyroll get the streaming rights ? I mean the studio probably would not respond to general public?


Generally, if you have enough money and a sound proposal, studios will listen to you. Some may have other requirements to ensure their work is properly handled and an institution with a track record might get a better deal than a person off the street but if you have enough money and something haven't been licensed yet, the prior licenses have expired, and/ or the current licenses are non-exclusive, then they'll certainly hear your proposal.

You would probably want to hire an attorney to actually make the deal since there's plenty of paperwork to draft and sign. Gamal Hennessy ( http://www.creativecontractconsulting.com ) might be someone to contact if you have the funds to hire an attorney an start licensing shows and movies. He mainly works in comics these days but in the past he worked for Central Park Media and locked down licenses for movies like Grave of Fireflies. He's not cheap but he's a good bloke. ( Side note: RIP CPM. )


A file is a file and information is information. I would probably improve the performance and reduce the cost. Thing is Crunchyroll relies solely on TV Tokyo. Will it be able to stand on its own?
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Posted 9/17/17 , edited 9/17/17

fredreload wrote:

Right, I've found Creative Commons to be an organization and not many anime uses Creative Commons licensing.

Well, does each show only have one license? Like if Crunchyroll acquires the license then Funimation cannot acquire the same license? And every show is probably copyrighted. The only way to purchase a license is by buying it directly off the studio right? I mean they are not listed on the site for sell is it?

P.S You are right, it is still best to ask the studio for streaming rights. How do Crunchyroll get the streaming rights ? I mean the studio probably would not respond to general public?

P.S Not bad, so you work with a television station, where they've acquired all the licenses


The price for distribution rights will vary depending on the quality of the production, reputation of the production team/studio and the number of companies competing for the licence.

As context, the anime Pumpkin Scissors was originally licensed to ADV films in North America for $780,000. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pumpkin_Scissors

The only realistic way for a complete unknown member of the public to gain streaming rights would be to license a series from a completely unknown artist from an amateur studio who is struggling to secure publicity. Anything else you will be infringing on the potential profits of one of the larger streaming sites. The other aspect to consider is that if you do somehow manage to become popular the odds are fairly high that someone else will offer that unknown artist a better deal and snatch the rights from you at the first opportunity.
xxJing 
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Posted 9/17/17 , edited 9/17/17
For a simple answer, it's an incentive for people to create things.

Most people are motivated to come up with good ideas and share them because they know they can profit from them. Copyright laws encourage people to come up with ideas by protecting the creator's ability to profit.
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Posted 9/17/17 , edited 9/17/17
Its an old antiquated example of people in power teaming up with others in power in order to prevent newcomers. Per every saintly good guy's IP you protect, you keep another one down. It is an example of a law made with good intentions that stifles more than it protects.

If we want to look at an example, many in the anime/manga industry don't adhere that closely to strict copyright rules, infringing upon them is almost a matter of fact. Go to Comiket and there'll be cover songs. Why, its theft!

This was also the case when classical music was big. if you were a new composer and made a new masterpiece, what was to stop some copycat from racing to another city and putting on a performance there? These things happened.

However fans like to reward the original creators. So for the most part the original creators still got the lion's share of profits and you didn't have unstoppable monopolies backed by copyright laws keeping their momentum going.

Compare western comics and manga and how new creators start out. Which is easier? When big companies try to push stricter copyright laws in Japan the creators find themselves forced to point out that lewd art of copyrighted characters was how many people got their start. These creators built up their audience by piggybacking off what is popular and then branched out. Meanwhile in the West, no one can touch a Cape Comic character, yet they lament they cannot raise new characters - as they actively fight against new creators who would bring about this new characters.

I will happily meet anyone in the middleground on this issue instead of copyright-for-life-and-beyond we have going on now.

Copyright Law just helps out monopolies. They pushed for it, they push for the expansion of it.
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Posted 9/17/17 , edited 9/18/17

NeofluxProductions wrote:


fredreload wrote:

Well, does each show only have one license? Like if Crunchyroll acquires the license then Funimation cannot acquire the same license? And every show is probably copyrighted. The only way to purchase a license is by buying it directly off the studio right? I mean they are not listed on the site for sell is it?


If the license is exclusive that means only 1 place can have it. If the license is non-exclusive that means multiple places can license it.

Ex: If you have Hulu you'll see some shows listed as 'ONLY ON HULU' while others are just available through Hulu. The 'ONLY ON HULU' titles are exclusive licenses. The rest of their catalog is non-exclusive. Non-exclusive doesn't mean it is currently available elsewhere just that it could be available elsewhere if someone else licenses it.

Licenses are generally for a finite terms ( 6 months, 1 year, 2 years, 5 years, etc. ) This is why titles regularly leave different streaming services. The license is usually only indefinite if they purchased the show or series ( or produced it themselves. )

With anime, the licensing can be trickier because subtitle tracks and dubbed audio tracks are often produced by the entity that licensed the show rather than the original studio.

Ex: Hulu has some subtitled anime series which they licensed from Crunchyroll and some dubbed anime series which they licensed from Funimation. 'In Another World With My Smartphone' is currently licensed exclusively(?) to Crunchyroll for English subtitles and Hulu is currently licensing the English subtitled version ( non-exclusively ) from Crunchyroll.

If you licensed the raw ( unsubbed/ undubbed ) anime from the studio, you'd likely need to translate it yourself ( well, hire someone to translate it for you. ) If the raw anime is currently licensed to a company which subbed or dubbed it, then odds are the license to make your own translation isn't currently available.

If the raw anime was previously licensed to a company which subbed or dubbed it but their license has expired, then you'd either need to acquire the translation rights and then resub/ redub the show or movie or you would need to license the original show or movie from the original animation studio and then license the subtitle and/ or dubbed audio tracks from the company which previously subbed or dubbed the show or movie. The subtitle and dubbed audio tracks are generally considered 'derivative works' and so require their own license. That's why you have cases like Akira, which has 2 dramatically different English dubs and the various series which have already been retranslated and resubbed 2-3 times by different companies ( because the new company would rather create their own translation than license the prior company's tracks. )

If the company which subbed or dubbed the anime still holds the right to that show or movie then often they also hold the right to license the subbed or dubbed versions of that anime. If the title you're looking to stream is currently released through Funimation then you should probably start by contacting Funimation to ask about licensing the streaming rights from them. If they no longer hold the rights to it, then you need to contact the studio to find out the current rights holder, license it from them, and then if you want Funimation's translated version, then you'd go back to Funimation and license the translation.



I guess technically I could purchase a non-exclusive anime license from Crunchyroll to stream, thanks for the clarification.
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Posted 9/17/17 , edited 9/18/17
Copyrights are, like any law or statute, beneficial so long as they are being followed. This is especially true in the age of the internet, when anybody can claim anything to be theirs without it being true. I think that laws regarding copyrights ought to be straightforward, simple, and followed as closely as possible.
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Posted 9/18/17 , edited 9/18/17
Copyright is needed to deal with goods that are not private good. Capitalism work well with private good but failed badly with public good, common resource, and artificially scarce good. Media products is an example of artitificially scarce good (or even public good in some context) since its availability is not affected by its number of comsumption and every producers can duplicate it. Copyright is used to make media product into private goods by state intervention so the media industries could function within Capitalism. However, the copyright law can be applied in inappropriate context to steal the work of others; I can describe a legal loophole tactics from a US historical period in steps:
1) person #1 produce a media product.
2) person #2 consume the media from company #1.
3) person #2 later decide to make his own media product.
4) person #1 then sue person #2 for copyright law on the unproven assumption that person #2 had copied from person #1.
5) person number #1 had gain a lot of money from his media product so he can hire a skilled lawyer to argue for his case.
6) person #2 had just start making money so he cannot hire a skilled lawyer.
7) person #2 lost all ownership of his media product to person #1.
Ejanss 
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Posted 9/18/17 , edited 9/19/17
So, you live in Taiwan, and that's why you're asking, right? Just checking.
(They tend to wonder why such a thing should exist, too.)


fredreload wrote:

Ever since the invention/discovery of computers, there has been copyrights.


Er, hahhh?--They "has" been around at least since 1900, mostly for the purpose of books, songs and plays.

Unless you meant "patents", of course, which have been around since the 18th century.
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