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Post Reply Cyberbullying... Is it real?
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Posted 9/21/17 , edited 9/21/17
Yes it's real. I don't think it's a thing on its own though. It's just the same bullying that has always happened, but now on the internet. I don't really have a problem with anti-bullying campaigns, because bullies suck. But it does get slightly annoying whenever it becomes a hot topic.
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Posted 9/21/17 , edited 9/21/17
The internet wasn't around when i was in school lol. Well it probably was but yeah...if it was i wasn't on it.
So i guess i dont really know.
But i think i have been "bullied" on line before, as far as ganged up on. But it didn't effect me. Maybe as a kid if you're bullied IRL as well as on line and dont have many friends, i can see how that could be bad.
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Posted 9/21/17 , edited 9/21/17
Yes and turning the pc off or hitting block is not an answer they have won by making you either get off the pc or they can get around the block.

Cyberbullying is an issue some of it is people have thin skin but it is definitely real people who don't believe in it tend to be idiots from what i have seen.

A lot of it is bullshit though i will give people that.
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Posted 9/21/17 , edited 9/21/17

Metallium wrote:

Absolutely not, grow a thicker skin and remember, the exit is always just 1 click away.


By this logic IRL bullying is not real as you can always just walk away and never return.
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Posted 9/21/17 , edited 9/21/17
Depends on what it is.
Yes, some bullying, cyber or not, does go way too far. Although a bit of a stretch to call it cyberbullying, I was once prank called by some random girl, accusing me of getting her pregnant, saying my dick is microscopic, and other various false sexual harassment. I'm just glad no one at my shitty middle school knew my steam username, and that I don't use normal social media.

But at the same time, I do think some people need to grow thicker hide and more venomous spit. Best way to deal with bullying (because let's be honest, if it actually is a problem, the deans are way too overwhelmed to do jack shit.) is to learn how to shrug off the minor insults, and be able to hurl them back, without holding back either. If they are insulting you, be as racist, sexist and overall nasty as possible. Don't be physical though if possible, they want you to do that, and will even bait you into it. Doing some push ups and building bulk does help though with avoiding physical aggression.

Now if it is NOT minor bullshit, like hacking into accounts, then it is definitely a problem. Mainly because you don't know who it is. However, standard internet safety and common sense does go a long way, as does muting, blocking, and not even responding.
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Posted 9/21/17 , edited 9/21/17
All government action to "fix" either cyber bullying or hate speech needs to be completely opposed. This is a really bad slippery slope of online censorship that politicians will use as a mask to censor speech that goes against whatever agenda they or their special interests want to push under the guise of shutting down cyber bullying or hate speech. And what people perceive or define as hate speech or cyber bullying can be changed over time. Don't give the government any ground when it comes to online speech.

@Ryulightorb That's a false comparison. If you're face to face, the chances of it turning physical is very high. They can also just refuse to let you walk away too, and bash your head in if you try. You also don't know if they're going to start throwing punches either. None of that is an issue when you're behind a screen.
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Posted 9/21/17 , edited 9/21/17

Jecht67 wrote:

All government action to "fix" either cyber bullying or hate speech needs to be completely opposed. This is a really bad slippery slope of online censorship that politicians will use as a mask to censor speech that goes against whatever agenda they or their special interests want to push under the guise of shutting down cyber bullying or hate speech. And what people perceive or define as hate speech or cyber bullying can be changed over time. Don't give the government any ground when it comes to online speech.

@Ryulightorb That's a false comparison. If you're face to face, the chances of it turning physical is very high. They can also just refuse to let you walk away too, and bash your head in if you try. You also don't know if they're going to start throwing punches either. None of that is an issue when you're behind a screen.




Bullying doesn't need to become physical to be bullying.

It's still bullying even if you can walk away and never come back.
Just because its easier to leave and you can let them win and never come back does not make it not bullying which is the point.
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Posted 9/21/17 , edited 9/21/17
I agree with what many have said to the point that there is a fair amount of legitimate claims of cyberbullying and there are some who are, as it was so crassly stated, "getting thin skinned".
I will have to disagree with those who try to equate blocking or removing your profile as a means of ending the alleged cyberbullying.
If this is your methodology to end cyberbullying it is clear that you are woefully ignoring the fact that your response isn't necessarily required in order for someone to proceed with bullying you online (and, by proxy, likely to be uneducated about technology to a lesser extent).
As Krissim had stated: "The thing with cyberbullying when it comes to children is it is often not with random strangers online but their peers."
This is only the beginning as to why cyberbullying seems to be gravely misunderstood by those who are often on the Internet and have escaped the "fad" of cyberbullying within their generation.

For the sake of the conversation, I will respond to amejia0's statements and questions directly (rather than going on an absolute off-shoot tangent).


amejia0 wrote:
Now its in my opinion that cyber bullying isn't as big an issue as its being presented as. I think the newer generations lack the experience of real bullying or even real problems and thus when faced with a little criticism or unpleasantly words they break down and let something so insignificant affect their lives.


While I agree that cyberbullying isn't necessarily an "epidemic" that is plaguing the entire planet, I think the aloofness behind your statement following it is a bit dismissive altogether.
Each generation has their "You think you had it tough..." comparison to the generation following it; which, essentially, is what your above statement comes off as to me.
Cyberbullying isn't just criticism or unpleasant words that are being posted on the Internet.
This leads us into the following statement.


amejia0 wrote:
The issue of bullying is only a problem when you cannot resolve it by removing yourself from the situation or by pleading with the other party to leave you alone. But on the internet? You can log off the computer, you can avoid websites where there are individuals going after you, most sites allow you to ignore certain individuals so you don't have to see what they are saying towards you.

There are many ways to avoid and completely disregard the cyber "bullies".


As I quoted from Krissim, the primary issue of cyberbullying is not when some stranger on a forum or social media says something that you dislike.
Nor is it really when they turn a subset of people on that particular outlet against you.
It's often when the cyberbullying impacts the individual's real-life circumstances, away from the Internet or the media platform in general.
It's when you block an individual or ignore their comments, but their comments have begun to influence those around you offline - where the "cyber" bit of bullying is only the antagonistic approach to convince others against the individual outside of the digital realm.

There are other situations that divert away from my last statement but still, impact's an individual's world outside of the website they're on.
Such as those who will obtain another user's personal information ('doxxing') and begin to harass them through anonymous means.
An example of this would be those who obtained information about an individual due to their opposing political views (note: this isn't a political statement, as this happened on both sides of the political spectrum) and would try to get them terminated from their place of employment, would get other users online (of the same board/forum/etc) to call the individual's mobile number to the point that the individual had to change their mobile phone number or similar actions.
Another example would be the act of "swatting" an individual who they dislike on the Internet, once they have the individual's home address.
These examples are aberrations of what you may correlate to cyberbullying, which I do understand.
My point with utilizing these examples is that, despite the extraordinary circumstances of these situations, they do happen.
Onwards to the questions.


amejia0 wrote:
Questions that come to mind are... why are individuals subject to thinking that they are helpless towards cyber bullies as if the bullies were constantly stalking/threatening individuals with tangible real life threat and harm. Why are our young individuals allowing someone from the other side of the globe have so much influence on their feelings and well being. How does someones imagination of a threat actually establish grounds for legal repercussions against the "bully". Why does our culture foster this mindset of sensitivity and butt hurt as things we must protect.(last I knew its not the governments job to protect peoples feelings)


Why are individuals subject to thinking that they are helpless towards cyber bullies as if the bullies were constantly stalking/threatening individuals with tangible real-life threat and harm?

Often the case, they are constantly stalking and threatening individuals.
When these individuals are your peers that you engage with outside of the digital realm, your fellow classmates or co-workers (as an example), you are around them constantly.
The Internet never "closes up shop" and a cyberbully only needs a few seconds to post to social media or some centralized website that the vast majority of your peers are often checking (at school and at work).
This can lead to rumors and speculation about the individual who is at the receiving end of the cyberbullying; which can expand to violent threats/actions, relationship complications, or concern over the perception that the rest of the school/office has of you.
To summarize my answer, I will quote another user.
Tyrconnel said it in the clearest way possible with "It's an update of the old style "mean girl" type of bullying."

Why are our young individuals allowing someone from the other side of the globe have so much influence on their feelings and well-being?

As I've mentioned several times already, the vast majority of those who are "genuine" individuals who are on the receiving end of cyberbullying tactics are not being attacked by someone "on the other side of the globe".
Cyberbullying expands, often, into the real world with real consequences or bullying.
When they cannot escape this scenario, the individual feels trapped and helpless.
It's instantaneous, real-time, and often not something that is done behind the individual's back.
Often, it becomes a "look at what this person said on this website said about you" situation and the individual is linked or a screenshot is provided.
Ignoring it doesn't stop it, either.
Blocking the individual only shows to them that they're getting under your skin.

How does someone's imagination of a threat actually establish grounds for legal repercussions against the "bully"?

When it is no longer part of someone's imagination, to put it plainly.
There have been cases where an individual is being "catfished" only for information (secrets, pornographic images of the individual, and similar "condemning" information/data) to spread to the entire school or office.
You could argue that the best way to go about this is to avoid disclosing this type of stuff to a stranger; which is actually what many "Anti-Cyberbullying" organizations have been suggesting parents discuss with their children.

Why does our culture foster this mindset of sensitivity and butt hurt as things we must protect.(last I knew its not the governments job to protect peoples feelings)?

This is a question without much intellectual merit; though, I will answer it to the best of my ability anyways.
It appears, in your mind, that you believe the someone being on a forum and complaining that the users are "cyberbullies" equates to why we foster the notion of cyberbullying.
This is not the case, however.
I believe I have given sufficient information to explain why the belief the cyberbullying has gained such "momentum" in the mainstream isn't due to the individual that is running rampant on forums or social media claiming that someone in another country is bullying them.

The last bit of your question, focusing on the government, is pretty easy to cover.
Parents of children who have killed themselves due to this blend of cyberbullying and bullying (in-person) have asked the government to step into this - to spread the word and help other parents understand why this is not "okay".
To expand on the previous statement, many of them have attempted to sue schools or state governments over cyberbullying situations that lead to their children's deaths.
When there is a "gray" notion in law that the government nor the law itself has any say in and they are being asked by citizens to figure out the best way to approach it in a legal manner, the government will attempt to put a legal definition to an act of legislature.


amejia0 wrote:
Offense is taken never given. If this is true then why are the "offenders/bullys" to blame.

Is it not the victims fault for placing themselves in an environment online (willingly or passively through not removing themselves ) where their sensitivity might be challenged?

What are your thoughts? Does it exist? Is it a problem? If so how can we address it? If not what are we doing wrong and what lines thought can we change to remove the ghost of cyber bullying from the discussion table


I've often seen people the phrase or memes of "offense is taken, never given" and it concerns me as to how quick people are to dismiss objectively offensive behavior.
Certainly, to take queues from Buddhism is not necessarily a poor decision.
The issue stems from the idea that passivity is the same as being stoic.
It's a fairly slippery slope in terms of logic and philosophy.

Would you say that it would be logical for you to watch a group of men attack an elderly gentleman for his wallet without trying to prevent it?
Would you take offense to someone doing this?

Yes, I understand that I went to the far extreme of this logic.
It was merely a hypothetical to explain how far that line of logic can extend, given enough rope.
My point in stating this is that when behavior is objectively (as objective as one can be) offensive the line "offense is taken, never given" does not appear to be pertinent to the situation.

Is it not the victims fault for placing themselves in an environment online (willingly or passively through not removing themselves ) where their sensitivity might be challenged?

When the victim (sic) does actually remove themselves from the online environment that is causing them grief and the issue escalates to their real life, your question seems to fall flat from reality.
Now, if you were to say that my response to this discussion warrants multiple users spamming my guestbook and that "stressed me out" - I would say that it's my responsibility to either disable posting on my guestbook or remove myself from the situation.
The latter scenario is not often the one that prompts legal action nor is it often the case in cyberbullying.

Does it exist? Is it a problem? If so, how do we address it?

This entire thread seems to stems from your lack of knowledge around cyberbullying and equating it to the 25-year olds who are crying about someone calling them a "loser" on an anonymous/unknown website.
I do hope that my responses have helped you understand that cyberbullying does exist and it does impact an individual's real-life circumstances in many cases too.
Addressing it a tricky situation in and of itself.
If we extend the arm to any sort of negative comment, we're allowing feelings and one's personal sensitivity impact another's life (in regard to legal consequences).

At the same time, education is often better than anything else.
Parents are often woefully uneducated on modern day issues that their children face (regardless of the generation).
Parents should take responsibility for educating their child to know the difference between "amejia0 said something mean about me and it was cyberbullying!" and "amejia0 is posting nude pictures I gave to this girl on Facebook that I thought liked me and my home address and embarrassing secrets on Crunchyroll, now I have people sending me boxes of dog crap and fake bombs".
They also need to educate their children about doing examples of the latter and how it is legally incriminating in many states.

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Posted 9/21/17 , edited 9/21/17
just like any form of bullying, if the person is unstable then the words will hurt either spoken or read. besides, since a lot are online than off, then bullies are more rapid on the net. not to mention there are so many thin skinned folks these days it doesn't matter, read or spoken these words are going to hurt. at least there is an option to block someone when it comes online, even report if they start to harass, however, you can't block someone in real life, ignore, but not block. do not feed...
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Posted 9/21/17 , edited 9/21/17
I personally don't think cyberbullying exists as much as people make it out to be. I just think that people are way too thin-skinned.
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Posted 9/21/17 , edited 9/21/17
Thankfully Cydoemus addressed it well so I don't have to.


Good thing too because I'm a lazy mother fucker today--and most of the time.

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Posted 9/21/17 , edited 9/21/17
The first episode of the season's Hell Girl did an interesting take on cyberbullying. Whether you're blocking someone or not, that crap can still spill over into your everyday life. And even if it's just random strangers on the internet, harassment can follow people around and negatively impact the places they like to visit.
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Posted 9/21/17 , edited 9/22/17
Many many years ago, I never understood why anyone would be cyberbulling me, because I'm type of person to be friends with everyone.. Of course I realized there no such thing.. Plus most of those cyberbulling are kinda of lame.. but I think I understand if it from your school mate.

I was thinking of that 13 year old girl that kill herself because her classmate keep bullying her on internet and in classroom as well.


I think they should be taught to not let it bother them and just simply block that person.
Posted 9/21/17 , edited 9/22/17
Cyber bullying is definitely real. Bullying exists to make the bully feels better about themselves by putting others down.

Being anonymous on the webs just makes it easier to target, execute, and disengage.
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Posted 9/22/17 , edited 9/23/17
Bullying is not only about physical aggression but include emotional (like harassment) and social aggression (like ostracization). Emotional and social aggression is not something light since they are used to enforce some toxic values or norms and can lead to dangeruos criminal behaviors if left unchecked. The broken glass window theory and Sword Art Online anime do address this issue. Note that the broken glass window theory had once been misapplied by racist US police who use it as an excuse to harass Latino Americans and African Americans on unreasonable ground; this misapplication should not be used to assess the validity of the broken glass window theory.

By the way, this topic did remind me of the Neo Nazi politics in Parkdale school in Toronto, Canada, from 2010 to 2013. The Nazi principal there allow constant harassment against the autistic chilldren and justify the harassment by claiming that emotional aggression is not painful. He would mock the autistic children for being unable to bear with harassment. The Nazi principal pretend to enforce a different morality in front of the parents of the autistic children; he will present a politically correct acts in front of the parents, state the correct application of the school rule related to bullying (even when they never enforce the school rule), and even provide a proper definition of harassment.

At one time, an autistic child harass the principal by asserting authority role over him as a protest for allowing harassment against the autistic but the principal then accuse the autistic child for harassment in contradiction to the principal's previous policy. The principal then tell the parents of the autistic child that "emotional aggression is more painful than physical aggression" (in contradiction to his previous moral preaching to the autistic). He subsequently use this logic to convince the parents to support a more severe punishment against the autistic children than that dictated by the school rule. The principal did not tell people that he is enforcing contradicting moral standard so the parents did not know that their autistic child were being punished for following a secret policy from the principal.
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