Post Reply I Require The Aid of Grammar Enthusiasts and Word Gurus
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Posted 9/26/17 , edited 9/27/17
I was going to use the term, "Grammar Nazis," but decided that maybe people who love grammar don't like being called Nazis.... So, I went with "Enthusiasts" instead.

I have a few questions. Not just about word usage and punctuation, but about what meanings are derived from how something is punctuated.

Grammar first:

"Go now." vs "Go, now." vs "Go. Now."

Are those the same? If not how are their meanings different?

Word usage and meaning next:

"Recluse" is an individual who chooses to live apart from society and keeps to himself. It is a noun.

Can I use the word as a verb?

"He reclused himself."

Or am I just inventing words?

If I can't use reclused what word can I use to show how an individual went to great lengths to be away from others?
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Posted 9/26/17 , edited 9/27/17
Not completely sure about the first part, but I think they are all the same.

As for word meaning, "recluse" is not a verb, so "reclused" is something you made up. The word you are looking for is "seclude".

"He secluded himself."
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Posted 9/26/17 , edited 9/27/17

DeadlyOats wrote:
If I can't use reclused what word can I use to show how an individual went to great lengths to be away from others?

I'm a grammar enthusiast but, I'm very poor when it comes to proper grammar use. With that being said I'll throw my hat into the ring. All three instances of "go now" mean the same thing, they are just spoken slightly different (mainly "go now" vs the other 2). I also believe that all three are grammatically correct.

This should explain why, when, and how you can use a non-verb word as a verb: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grammatical_conjugation

I think it's okay to use reclused but if you had to choose another word, maybe withdrew / isolated.
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Posted 9/27/17 , edited 9/27/17
"Go now." vs "Go, now." vs "Go. Now."

All three have the same meaning but convey subtly different emotions to the reader. Try saying the following phrases, with no pause in the first sentence, a short pause at the comma in the second sentence and a slightly longer pause at the full stop (period) in the third sentence.

"I want you to go now."
"I want you to go, now."
"I want you to go. Now."

You can even go further by replacing the punctuation with elipses, hyphens and exclamation marks. All give clues to read the line slightly differently and convey a slightly nuanced emotional meaning.


It came as a bit of a surprise to me but reclused is actually a real word. Unfortunately though it is an adjective rather than a verb and the dictionary entry doesn't give an example of proper usage. https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/reclused

Alternative ways to convey a similar meaning are:

"He became a recluse."
"He went into seclusion."
"He adopted an erimitic lifestyle."
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Posted 9/27/17 , edited 9/27/17
Thanks all, for your replies! These were helpful to me. Now I know I didn't make up a word, but I was still using it wrong. I guess I'll used secluded or seclusion, then. Thanks again, everyone!
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Posted 9/27/17 , edited 9/27/17
I'm no guru, but here's my two cents, anyways.



Grammar first:

"Go now." vs "Go, now." vs "Go. Now."


All three meanings remain identical, but each is written in a way that implies a specific tone. The last one appears to be improper, if not incorrect. "Go, now" would work well in dialogue.


"Recluse" is an individual who chooses to live apart from society and keeps to himself. It is a noun.

Can I use the word as a verb?

"He reclused himself."


It's not strictly correct but it's still valid, I think. Even if it isn't, those with a moderate understanding of English will have no issues understanding you.
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Posted 9/27/17 , edited 9/27/17
They're not the same in context. Language is highly dependent on the context where you use it. Both what you're talking about, and how you intend something to come across.

"Go now." vs "Go, now." vs "Go. Now."

All of those would seem to have the context of dialog. Someone is speaking to someone else.

In the context of a description of events or a list of instructions, all of those would be confusing and potentially "wrong."

If we stick to dialog, here are some different contexts.

1. Bill is extremely angry and Bob. He's already asked to be left alone twice. Bill closes his eyes and says, "Go. Now."

2. Larry is a board and strategy game enthusiast. Kelley asks him, "What's the name of the Asian game with the black and white discs you take turns placing on a wooden board to capture the other pieces? And when do you want to play me at it? Larry: "Go. Now."

3. The self destruct sequence has already begun and there are only two minutes until explosion. The friendly robot XCI3, who has guided you on the journey for weeks was badly damaged in the cave-in and his legs no longer work. He's far too heavy to lift and there's no way to stop the detonation. XCI3 turns to you, and in a weak electronic voice, whispers, "Go. Now."
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Posted 9/29/17 , edited 9/29/17
In the case of "Go. Now" it's grammatically incorrect, indeed. Any English teacher who would look at that would cringe in horror. That being said, "Go now", versus "Go, now" and "Go. Now" all give different tones to a conversation. Though at this point I'm just repeating what has been said before, I'll ignore that in favour of continuing.
If I were to write a complete scene out from each one, I would first flesh the "Go now" as a far more polite and calm way of asking someone to leave, which with each pause grows, pardon the phrase, quite a bit more dramatic. I could imagine someone saying "Go." walking up the door, yanking it open, "now."
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Posted 10/1/17 , edited 10/2/17
Thanks for adding your thoughts to this subject. That helps to expand the possibilities of each of those variations of how "go" and "now," together, can be used.

"You are ready to begin your trials, apprentice. Go now."

"Stand by to execute operation rabid rabbit. Go, now!

"You have tested my patience for the last time. Leave my presence. Go. Now."
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Posted 10/1/17 , edited 10/2/17

DeadlyOats wrote:
"You have tested my patience for the last time. Leave my presence. Go. Now."


Ouch. I didn't realise you intended to use it that way. I'd avoid using that one; you may be able to stretch to having "Now" in a separate sentence but both "Go" and "Now" in single word sentences make me cringe.

You could introduce a similar effect by splitting your dialogue, like so;

"You have tested my patience for the last time. Leave my presence," he commanded in a cold voice, "Go," he flicked his wrist towards the door, "Now."
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