Post Reply How to stop artist abuse in anime industry?
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Posted 10/3/17
Having really enjoyed SAKURA QUEST, I looked to see what other "slice of life" titles P.A. Works did before, and ended up enjoying HANASAKU IROHA and also just finished watching SHIROBAKO.

The latter made me wonder about the anime industry and I was rather shocked to learn that talented artists are poorly paid, with some even committing suicide due to not being able to make a living!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ToKL1lSoeJI

So I was really glad to come across this article

https://www.otakujournalist.com/where-your-crunchyroll-dollars-really-go-an-interview-with-the-ceo/


Most of your money goes straight to the industry

Gao couldn’t reveal to me how much of your Crunchyroll payment goes back to anime publishers because of nondisclosure agreements. But he did say that publishers are “ecstatic” about the revenue they receive, and that publishers probably wouldn’t agree to work with Crunchyroll in such large numbers if they were getting such a bad deal.


Does anyone have any further information about this topic?

It seems really terrible that “sweat shops” exist for anime production. It sounds so similar to abuse in the gaming industry.

People complain all the time about robots and computers taking away jobs, and yet, hand-drawn anime is such a manual process that requires humans, and humans with talent (not easily replaceable), so one would think that the artists would actually be able to earn a decent living?
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Posted 10/3/17
Haven't heard too much on this.
I did find an article a while back talking about how some new artists get paid 1 USD per frame, which seems absolutely crazy.
They end up making more money by selling their drawings online as a way to survive while they keep 'gaining experience'.

I'll see if I can track it down for you


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Posted 10/3/17 , edited 10/3/17
from what i remember reading, artisst are paid by the number of frames drawn. most of the money do go to the industry, but it doesn't mean it distribute that money equally among those who work in the industry.

edit: though i think most do go to the artist if you buy the manga / art books.
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Posted 10/3/17
Unfortunately, it will probably take some sort of huge organized animator strike which would put a halt on all our precious anime.
Humms 
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Posted 10/3/17
lol.

You are either working for the industry, or working for yourself.

Pick one because you can find out what the industry will do to you, or you can find out what you can do for yourself.
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Posted 10/3/17
It's also important to remember that out of the money that goes into an anime, it's not simply divided between the animators, and some greedy corporate thugs or whatever. There are so many different roles that go into anime - the actual frame drawing is only one part of it.

Besides the coloring and other digital effects that are done to the actual visual frames after the animators draw them, there's the writing, direction, storyboarding, planning, etc. that comes before the drawing.

There's also the music, both hiring a composer for the BGM and musicians to play it. There are some really great composers doing BGM for anime, and that's great, but I don't imagine they work for cheap. (If an artist other than the seiyuu does the OP or ED, generally it's because their record label helped pay for the anime so they don't get paid for that, they pay for it. They get paid, in a sense, by the increase in record sales.)

And the people who make the most money off of anime are probably the seiyuu.

The solution, I think, is to just have anime make more money. A bigger pot means everyone gets a bigger portion. Even when they're not paying the animation studios a fair amount, most anime already lose money.
If more anime made tons of money, there would either be better pay for all the artists involved (which, in turn, would attract more artists into the medium), and there would be more anime made - and better anime, too, since they would have more time and resources to make it.

(btw the producers of anime don't have the animators as employees, like Disney, or something. They contract various parts of the animation to various studios, some of which then subcontract certain parts to other studios. Someone look up the ANN articles about this - I'm already procrastinating on school work by taking this long to write this).

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Posted 10/4/17

Humms wrote:

lol.

You are either working for the industry, or working for yourself.

Pick one because you can find out what the industry will do to you, or you can find out what you can do for yourself.


Not really sure what you mean by that.

It’s terrible talented artists are sometimes driven to suicide because of this.
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Posted 10/4/17
You can't . You would have to change the Japanese work culture as well
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Posted 10/4/17

LavenderMintRose wrote:
The solution, I think, is to just have anime make more money. A bigger pot means everyone gets a bigger portion. Even when they're not paying the animation studios a fair amount, most anime already lose money.
If more anime made tons of money, there would either be better pay for all the artists involved (which, in turn, would attract more artists into the medium), and there would be more anime made - and better anime, too, since they would have more time and resources to make it.


>better pay for all artists
why should the CEOs pay more money to animators when they don't have to? they could just pocket the extra money they get, or make more anime while continuing to pay below minimum wage to animators.worse case scenario, they'll just outsource the work to some other country, like S. Korea or China. more money by itself won't solve anything.

there's also the work culture factor that was already mentioned.
Humms 
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Posted 10/4/17

waikikiwarrior wrote:


Humms wrote:

lol.

You are either working for the industry, or working for yourself.

Pick one because you can find out what the industry will do to you, or you can find out what you can do for yourself.


Not really sure what you mean by that.

It’s terrible talented artists are sometimes driven to suicide because of this.


Yeah, it's terrible...

terrible people find the only solution to be suicide for them to be happy.

I get it, people have standards. Work you like a dog just so you can barely pay for living expenses, have no money for other things, and dedicate every waking moment to the industry.

They like slaves working for them, but they don't want to actually call you a slave. More like..... a glorified Pencil pusher

but hey, we have standards, We are the greatest artists known to man!

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Posted 10/4/17 , edited 10/4/17
So let's start by not immediately referring to it as artist abuse. Don't get wrong, the conditions of various animators sucks, but it's more complicated than whether the big-bad companies within a production committee are mistreating anime studios or not. In the first place, anime studios are generally not part of the production committee of any project and are thus just sub-contractors animators and directors, storyboard artists and what-not get paid through wages.

That being said, you want a solution? Look to Youtuber, The Canipa Effect and his video about crowdfunding projects that can experiment on sustaining individual animators.

By the way, I wouldn't begin and end your intrigue about the medium and production woes through that one video. Look at Canipa Effect's archive of videos and the appeals and complications of the medium, go on his twitter account @Canipashow, go read Canipa Effect's (his real name is Callum may btw) article about the same topic on Anime News Network, go to @Yuyucow and check any posts he has about various animators and projects. Hell, go to Blog.Sakugabooru.com, which Kevin Cirugeda (which is Yuyucow's real name and is one of the founders of Sakugabooru) has whole translated articles and editorials about the staff and production notes of various anime! Looking at all of this will really help broaden your view of the industry.
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Posted 10/4/17

Hypeathon wrote:

So let's start by not immediately referring to it as artist abuse. Don't get wrong, the conditions of various animators sucks, but it's more complicated than whether the big-bad companies within a production committee are mistreating anime studios or not. In the first place, anime studios are generally not part of the production committee of any project and are thus just sub-contractors animators and directors, storyboard artists and what-not get paid through wages.

That being said, you want a solution? Look to Youtuber, The Canipa Effect and his video about crowdfunding projects that can experiment on sustaining individual animators.

By the way, I wouldn't begin and end your intrigue about the medium and production woes through that one video. Look at Canipa Effect's archive of videos and the appeals and complications of the medium, go on his twitter account @Canipashow, go read Canipa Effect's (his real name is Callum may btw) article about the same topic on Anime News Network, go to @Yuyucow and check any posts he has about various animators and projects. Hell, go to Blog.Sakugabooru.com, which Kevin Cirugeda (which is Yuyucow's real name and is one of the founders of Sakugabooru) has whole translated articles and editorials about the staff and production notes of various anime! Looking at all of this will really help broaden your view of the industry.


Thanks for the insightful and informative post.
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