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Post Reply Do You Practice Martial Arts?
Posted 10/14/17 , edited 10/14/17

karatecowboy wrote:


GrandMasterTime wrote:

Only martial art I ever practised was Karate when I was younger.


Hence why you're a grandmaster? You stuck with that one art and dedicated all your time to it?


Oh I didn't know Grandmaster was a term used in martial arts, my name is a chess reference.
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Posted 10/14/17 , edited 10/15/17

Hoshikudaki wrote:

Ever since I've watched Detective Conan and saw Sera, I've been wanting to try JKD. Unfortunately I don't have the money and time rn.



Jeet Kune Do.. I was told it more of a philosophy instead of Martial arts.. -shrugs- I'll copy and paste this section from Jeet Kune Do Wikipedia.

Jeet Kune Do (Chinese: 截拳道; Cantonese Yale: Jit6kyun4dou6; [tsìːt̚.kʰy̏ːn.tòu]), abbreviated JKD, is a hybrid philosophy of martial arts heavily influenced by the personal philosophy and experiences of martial artist Bruce Lee. Lee, who founded the system on July 9, 1969, referred to it as "non-classical", suggesting that JKD is a form of Chinese Kung Fu, yet without form. Unlike more traditional martial arts, Jeet Kune Do is not fixed or patterned, and is a philosophy with guiding thoughts. It was named for the Wing Chun concept of interception or attacking while one's opponent is about to attack. Jeet Kune Do practitioners believe in minimal movement with maximum effect. On January 10, 1996, the Bruce Lee Foundation decided to use the name Jun Fan Jeet Kune Do (振藩截拳道) to refer to the martial arts system which Lee founded; "Jun Fan" being Lee's Chinese given name.

In the screenplay of the 1973 Warner Brothers film, Enter the Dragon, when Lee is asked, "What's your style?" Lee replied, "My style?...You can call it the art of fighting without fighting."

Bruce believed that kata forms and martial art tournament matches alike (like Karate) were simply "organised despair". He believed that in order to "fully express oneself, one must" "have no limitations" (kata and rigid and non-flowing movements being the limitation). His system was revolutionary, and included all possible forms of strikes: attacks to the groin, finger jab to the eye. Bruce's system's concept was one of the first early form of what we know now as MMA.

The name Jeet Kune Do was often said by Lee to be just a name, and he often referred to it as "the art of expressing the human body" in his writings and in interviews. Through his studies Lee came to believe that styles had become too rigid and unrealistic. He called martial art competitions of the day "dry land swimming". He believed real combat was spontaneous, and a martial artist cannot predict it, but only react to it, and a good martial artist should "be like water"—move fluidly without hesitation.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeet_Kune_Do
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Posted 10/14/17 , edited 10/15/17
Interested in Iaido. Not very practical in this day and age but looks cool.
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Posted 10/14/17 , edited 10/15/17
I wish I did.

I almost got enrolled in Tai Chi when I was younger.

And yes, I realize that's barely a martial art
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Posted 10/14/17 , edited 10/15/17
I did taekwondo for a while. A lot of people like to take a fat dump on traditional martial arts and say "you'd get your ass whooped in a real fight". While that may be true, taekwondo kicks are pretty legit. Joe Rogan swears by them.

Also, it was good exercise and I made some good friends from it. I had a lot of fun at tournaments. Half the time we were just chilling on the sides, playing games.
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Posted 10/14/17 , edited 10/15/17

karatecowboy wrote:


cdarklock wrote:

A person who did not want to learn came to your school and took a class?


Yes. He was a regular at another school. The whole time he was criticizing everything and talking down.


This is someone who has hit a plateau in his training and wants a return to the rapid progress he saw in the earlier stages. He needs to learn something to progress, but he doesn't want to learn that because it is hard. Instead, he is desperately hunting for someone who will teach him something easy.

Notice the part where he still wants to learn, but what he learns is not going to help him. It's the same when someone wants to spar to see who is better. He talks trash and issues a challenge, thinking he's going to learn something. He's still not going to learn what he needs to learn: that sparring doesn't answer the question he's asking, and he's not even asking the right question.

But it is difficult, when your livelihood depends on people paying you for instruction, to refuse a student the lesson he wants because it is not the lesson he needs. And I don't judge any other instructor's personal choices in these matters. I only judge my own.
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Posted 10/15/17 , edited 10/15/17

karatecowboy wrote:


Rinnybean wrote:




My collarbone popped through my skin and my shoulder blade was smashed to bits. I've had 4 surgeries on it so yeah it was nasty and I have metal all inside me now lol.


CRINGING INTENSIFIES

That sounds horrid. Sends a shiver down my spine. Does it prevent you from kicking? You're only 25.


djason1988 wrote:

I personally find the "gentle art" to be the biggest myth in jiu jitsu. While you pretty much constantly have bruises and scrapes in striking arts, the serious injuries I've seen occurred almost exclusively in BJJ. I've seen tons of broke fingers/toes, a few broken collar bones, and a plethora of torn rotator cuffs and knee injuries. I'll see more injuries at any given NAGA than I will in a whole year of karate tournaments.


The worst I've ever had in six years was a jammed knuckle. I think competition is dramatically different from rolling in the dojo. At a tournament people's pride and such are on the line, and I think that gets in the way of the principle I mentioned: tap early, tap often. That's one reason why I don't do tournaments. Another reason is that I don't really see the point, given they're divided by rank. I think of it this way: Imagine I am a blue belt and attend a tournament twice a week for a year. I win and win and win, proving myself to be better than all the other blue belts out there. I am the best blue belt in the world... Doesn't that just mean I really ought to be a purple belt?

If I ever get to black belt I may consider competing. Until then my philosophy is that when I can consistently beat everyone and my school, then I have a reason to go looking for challenges outside my school.


No it doesn't but my style has a lot of punching and grappling in it too, perhaps I could still do the sporty form of Taekwondo which only has kicking and some punching but that style doesn't interest me. I still train to go up in the grades and I also teach now so I'm quite content with the whole situation but I could have gone far if it wasn't for that horrible injury lol.
Posted 10/15/17 , edited 10/15/17
No.
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Posted 10/15/17 , edited 10/15/17
Nope.
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Posted 10/15/17 , edited 10/16/17

cdarklock wrote:


karatecowboy wrote:


cdarklock wrote:

A person who did not want to learn came to your school and took a class?


Yes. He was a regular at another school. The whole time he was criticizing everything and talking down.


This is someone who has hit a plateau in his training and wants a return to the rapid progress he saw in the earlier stages. He needs to learn something to progress, but he doesn't want to learn that because it is hard. Instead, he is desperately hunting for someone who will teach him something easy.

Notice the part where he still wants to learn, but what he learns is not going to help him. It's the same when someone wants to spar to see who is better. He talks trash and issues a challenge, thinking he's going to learn something. He's still not going to learn what he needs to learn: that sparring doesn't answer the question he's asking, and he's not even asking the right question.

But it is difficult, when your livelihood depends on people paying you for instruction, to refuse a student the lesson he wants because it is not the lesson he needs. And I don't judge any other instructor's personal choices in these matters. I only judge my own.


I feel this type of thing goes way underrated. I don't know if it's the exact same situation, but I I'm guessing this is relevant.

Personally, I don't care about the belt, I just want to learn and practice. I went home for the summer one year and wanted to practice Judo. I looked into to two gyms. One was a very "gym" type place with the focus on competing and winning, etc. The instructor started talking about belts when I talked to him and I was like "nope." The other Dojo was much quieter, seemed focused on just practice, everything else was secondary. Like half way through, he said they're would be a belt test. It came, went, didn't feel like a test, and that's the only mention of belts. Technically I past, but Judo also required time in belt, so I didn't get anything.

Martial Arts, especially eastern ones, were founded highly in philosophy. The actual moves is only one half of it. The spirit of learning and mastery through repeated practice are the other half.
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Posted 10/15/17 , edited 10/16/17
Studied Kempo for nearly 9 years. Practiced many different styles due to having a versatile teacher who was awesome at teaching new techniques. Even dabbled a bit in Kendo and I made it all the way to my 3rd degree black belt. Had to leave for a few yers due to personal reasons (School, work etc.) then studied a bit after and lost interest partly due to not having enough time traveling to the right dojo and the ones who were close and relatively easy to get to, charged an arm and a leg (so to speak) per month. I tried getting back into the old dojo I started with but found out he wasn't practicing martial arts as much so I gave up (at least for the time being). Overall though, I'd highly recommend anyone to practice martial arts. Its a great way to meet new people, develop friendships, but also learn about self defense and being taught how to respect others as well as yourself. I wish I could get into more detail on my own personal feelings but its hard to really explain what its all about on paper or code for that matter lol. Your best bet is to try as many schools as you can, and decide on which one is best for you without breaking the bank. Most dojos have free tryout classes and if you sign up, give you your first belt and your own Gi.
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Posted 10/15/17 , edited 10/16/17
I've done a lot of Martial Arts but, I primarily come from WTF Olympic style TaeKwonDo

I recently got back into it the last couple of years for health reasons but, under the ITF system. Now I'm healthy, 50 lbs lighter again and will be competing on an International Level.

I also teach TKD and boxing at the current school. I also train doing Krav Maga a couple nights a week.

I've trained in the following: TKD ITF(3yrs)+WTF(19yrs), Boxing(5yrs), Krav(2yrs), Muy Thai(2yrs), Capoeira(1yr), Escrima(1.5yrs), BJJ(1yr) and Wado Ryu(1yr)

My preference in TaeKwonDo only stems it from being something I started learning at an early age so it became my "base style/foundation" for everything else so I just naturally keep gravitating back to it. I branched out to the other styles to learn more about striking with my hands as TKD notoriously neglects hand strikes for sparring.
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Posted 10/15/17 , edited 10/16/17

zero356 wrote:

Personally, I don't care about the belt, I just want to learn and practice.


It took me a long time to reach that point, and I don't think anyone can get there without stumbling over it themselves. I think you have to have an epiphany somewhere along the line, where you realise how little it matters to compare your progress to anyone else's. We're all on our own journeys with our own destinations.

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Posted 10/15/17 , edited 10/16/17

cdarklock wrote:


zero356 wrote:

Personally, I don't care about the belt, I just want to learn and practice.


It took me a long time to reach that point, and I don't think anyone can get there without stumbling over it themselves. I think you have to have an epiphany somewhere along the line, where you realise how little it matters to compare your progress to anyone else's. We're all on our own journeys with our own destinations.



I guess I'm lucky then. I got it in highschool. A combination of Cross Country, some anime, and academic rigor.

For Cross Country, I sucked, but I kept going and I liked it. Barring the very best, you're less racing against everyone else and more racing against yourself. You train and work to become better than you were.

Then there's the anime. Anime in general pushes "a never give up" mentality but then there was Gurren Lagann. I watched it when I was about 13-14 (Freshman year of high school) and it drove that message home very well. Never stop moving forward

But obviously not in the way they did, what with giant robots and all that. And I sucked athletically, so what? Academics, and more realizing that it's also not just blind effort. Breaking through the wall in your way works, but there usually a few other ways as well.

And it carried over very well. I think I'm good academically (Engineering major, so Math+Science) because it's never been a set of steps. The steps are obviously there at some point, but it's more the process. Why that equation? For the fundamentals class, they give us like 10 different formulas for projectile motion. Really, you just need one and some Algebra.


It's not study to get a belt. It's study to learn and improve. Advancement and ranks are organizational and clerical. If I move, where do I start at the new dojo? Who do I compete against? Etc.
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Posted 10/15/17 , edited 10/16/17
I train in Shorin-ryu Reihokan Karate.
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