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Post Reply Liberals love Trump's tax plan when told its Bernies tax plan.
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Posted 10/25/17

karatecowboy wrote:

That said: I read an article that Trump's tax proposals would make the budget deficit neutral. At this point, that is a very, very, very good thing. Have you heard the same?


Most economic analysis find that Trumps tax plan will add about 1.5trillion to the debt and the budget adds another 3.5trillion. I believe these figures are over ten years.

Under this, the deficit/gdp per year increases about 50% I believe.
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Posted 10/25/17

karatecowboy wrote:


mxdan wrote:


That just isn't even remotely true.

https://www.ted.com/talks/james_flynn_why_our_iq_levels_are_higher_than_our_grandparents

Testing has become more difficult because of the scope of our knowledge base increasing. Education quality is decreasing because standardized testing and primary focus on STEM fields leads to disinterest for many children. Which in turn makes it harder to learn psychologically. But to say that an education in the 1900's was better? Come on now.



Could you pass this test? Do you think most college graduates or even students could pass this test?

http://grandfather-economic-report.com/1895-test.htm


While I think some questions may have merit, this seems to be no more than asking a theoretical physicist "Who was Herman Melville, and differentiate whether these works were his or Ernest Hemingway".

That is just me being unfair. Of course, it bears to mention that I believe child labor was quite common in the 1900s, up until The Triangle Shirt Waist Fire in 1911 (Where workers were locked in to prevent their escape), general muckraking, etc. It may that education wasn't considered a right for young children in those days, but I am not too sure.

Curious thing I noted, in the game Bioshock: Infinite, antagonist Jeremiah Fink is known to use slave labor that he only pays with currency redeemable at his own stores, which is what largely happened in the US during this time period.

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Posted 10/25/17

karatecowboy wrote:
Unfortunately, a college education isn't what it used to be. I've seen where college freshman today couldn't pass a high school entrance exam from the early 1900's. Americans, even college educated ones, are generally terrible at geography. Unfortunately, we're even worse at math. I don't think it's going to get any better, either.


I mean....

There's a large gap in scores between the races, which is unfortunate. The races on the low end are also making up a much larger portion of America's students and teachers, now. Which is why there's a call to lower our standards, because the reality is that we can only expect a certain level of performance from people, and they should be able to function and contribute to society at that level without problems.

My mother teaches, and there are parents who pay to get their children into that school district. When you hire the highly competent and invest in strong, useful programs, while other schools lower their standards, you will start to siphon off the good students from other communities. This is why some communities grow weaker and weaker, because the talented will find greener pastures. Companies will also look at the schools, know their reputation, and decide on hires and pay based on that.

It's a parent's duty to get their child into the right school. Yes, there will be more schools with low standards in America, which is unavoidable. They must move to good schools if their child has the ability to excel.

This creates our social hierarchy.

American education is incredibly powerful. Many members of my family travel the world, to New Zealand, Australia, UK, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain, and other countries who hire our US-based companies for engineering and computer software expertise. Dams, traffic control systems, electrical grids, communications, and so on. They have no competitors, they accept whatever contracts they want.

However, in some areas that education will start to decline because of changing demographics. It will remain strong in other areas, for specific communities of people. That's my understanding of the situation, anyway.
mxdan 
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Posted 10/25/17 , edited 10/25/17

karatecowboy wrote:


mxdan wrote:


That just isn't even remotely true.

https://www.ted.com/talks/james_flynn_why_our_iq_levels_are_higher_than_our_grandparents

Testing has become more difficult because of the scope of our knowledge base increasing. Education quality is decreasing because standardized testing and primary focus on STEM fields leads to disinterest for many children. Which in turn makes it harder to learn psychologically. But to say that an education in the 1900's was better? Come on now.



Could you pass this test? Do you think most college graduates or even students could pass this test?

http://grandfather-economic-report.com/1895-test.htm


I mean tests were localized back then so it depends on that schools teaching methods. But it doesn't seem that hard with a basic knowledge base of each subject. I haven't taken a geology test in 10 years but I can answer every question there. Hell, in 1895 they hadn't the slightest idea of plate tectonics so it's completely devoid of those concepts. And those history concepts are based on a more intimate time period which makes them easier to someone in that time period.

Basically what I'm saying is you're looking at it from the perspective of a 21st century citizen. A 20th or 19th century citizen might look at this and think the same at our tests but that doesn't mean it's true.




I mean high school classes are starting to include quantum mechanic material these days. Good luck explaining that theoretical concept to someone from the 1800s with no framework.
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Posted 10/25/17

karatecowboy wrote:
Could you pass this test? Do you think most college graduates or even students could pass this test?

http://grandfather-economic-report.com/1895-test.htm


Hmm...

What do you think, lads? Maybe two hours of studying the night before this test would make an easy A?

At least half of these are answerable off the top of my head, and we get 5 hours to work through it. I don't think I'll spend 5 hours on it just for fun, though.

I mean, sure, because of Gundam we're all thinking of the Odessa in Ukraine, but it probably means the Odessa in Texas.
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