Post Reply Fear of spiders and snakes is deeply embedded in us
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Posted 10/21/17 , edited 10/22/17
Well then my dislike of spiders stems from my genetics. Interesting. Genetic memory is quite interesting.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171019110953.htm



When the babies saw a snake or a spider (second row) instead of a flower or a fish (first row) of the same size and colour, their pupils enlarged significantly (red versus green curve). This is a distinct signal that they felt stressed looking at these animals.

Presumably, in industrialized countries, especially in middle Europe, most people have never come across a poisonous spider or snake in the wild. In most of this countries there are nearly no spiders or snakes that pose a threat to humans. Nevertheless, there are few people that would not shiver at the thought of a spider crawling up their arm, however harmless it may be.

This fear can even develop into anxiety which limits a person's daily life. Such people are always on edge and cannot enter a room before it is declared "spider free" or cannot venture out into nature for sheer fear that they may encounter a snake. In developed countries one to five per cent of the population are affected by a real phobia of these creatures.

Until now, it was not clear where this widespread aversion or anxiety stems from. While some scientists assume that we learn this fear from our surroundings when we are a child, others suppose that it is innate. The drawback of most previous studies on this topic was that they were conducted with adults or older children -- making it hard to distinguish which behaviour was learnt and which was inborn. Such studies with children only tested whether they spot spiders and snakes faster than harmless animals or objects, not whether they show a direct physiological fear reaction.

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences (MPI CBS) in Leipzig and the Uppsala University, Sweden, recently made a crucial observation: Even in infants a stress reaction is evoked when they see a spider or a snake. And this already at the age of six months, when they are still very immobile and have had little opportunity to learn that these animals can be dangerous.

"When we showed pictures of a snake or a spider to the babies instead of a flower or a fish of the same size and colour, they reacted with significantly bigger pupils," says Stefanie Hoehl, lead investigator of the underlying study and neuroscientist at MPI CBS and the University of Vienna. "In constant light conditions this change in size of the pupils is an important signal for the activation of the noradrenergic system in the brain, which is responsible for stress reactions. Accordingly, even the youngest babies seem to be stressed by these groups of animals."

"We conclude that fear of snakes and spiders is of evolutionary origin. Similar to primates, mechanisms in our brains enable us to identify objects as 'spider' or 'snake' and to react to them very fast. This obviously inherited stress reaction in turn predisposes us to learn these animals as dangerous or disgusting. When this accompanies further factors it can develop into a real fear or even phobia. "A strong panicky aversion exhibited by the parents or a genetic predisposition for a hyperactive amygdala, which is important for estimating hazards, can mean that increased attention towards these creatures becomes an anxiety disorder."

Interestingly, it is known from other studies that babies do not associate pictures of rhinos, bears or other theoretically dangerous animals with fear. "We assume that the reason for this particular reaction upon seeing spiders and snakes is due to the coexistence of these potentially dangerous animals with humans and their ancestors for more than 40 to 60 million years -- and therefore much longer than with today's dangerous mammals. The reaction which is induced by animal groups feared from birth could have been embedded in the brain for an evolutionarily long time.

For modern risks such as knives, syringes or sockets, presumably the same is true. From an evolutionary perspective they have only existed for a short time, and there has been no time to establish reaction mechanisms in the brain from birth. "Parents know just how difficult it is to teach their children about everyday risks such as not poking their fingers into a socket," Hoehl adds with a smile.


Posted 10/21/17 , edited 10/22/17
Yeah you notice that when Evolution is real. We evolved to notice venomous creature, it helped us live longer at some point.
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Posted 10/21/17 , edited 10/22/17

Zenpie wrote:

Yeah you notice that when Evolution is real. We evolved to notice venomous creature, it helped us live longer at some point.


Its really neat how we have a genetic memory. Evolution is a very neat thing.
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Posted 10/21/17 , edited 10/22/17
I'm hesitant about all spiders, and the only thing that has gotten me from full blown paranoia to 'just don't touch me and we will both be fine' is a little cute spider pokemon that I could only find 20 minutes before bedtime. (when I was 6) It had the cutest little cry and made my heart melt. As much as I may think a dancing peacock spider is cute as a button, if it got on me, it will die a quick death.

I'm also hesitant about snakes, until I can confirm it is both non venomous and not aggressive. My friend asked if it was ok for me to hold a ball python, considering I said that I would throw their tarantula into a wall if they made me hold it. I asked if it was venomous or aggressive, they said no. I then held it in my hands, and it was cute and cool.

Link to some dope ass speeders

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AOYsD2zQPe4&t=2
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Posted 10/21/17 , edited 10/22/17
So... Babies are more afraid of fish than they are of spiders and flowers? It bothers me that the article mysteriously refrains from mentioning this detail, and I therefore cannot put near as much stock into the study's conclusion as I normally would.
Posted 10/21/17 , edited 10/22/17
Well yeah. So is death and disease, and creepy crawlers often cause it.
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Posted 10/21/17 , edited 10/22/17
And yet people will still buy spiders for pets.
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Posted 10/21/17 , edited 10/22/17

MonoDreams wrote:

And yet people will still buy spiders for pets.


Living on the edge.
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Posted 10/21/17 , edited 10/22/17

MonoDreams wrote:

And yet people will still buy spiders for pets.


What kind of an insane person would do this?!

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Posted 10/22/17 , edited 10/22/17

Ibkickin2 wrote:


MonoDreams wrote:

And yet people will still buy spiders for pets.


What kind of an insane person would do this?!

One preparing a spider army.


Posted 10/22/17 , edited 10/22/17
Saw something weird in the corner of my eye, took off my glasses to find a tiny spider was dangling from it. That's way too close to my goddamn eyes, spiders.

Snakes are pretty cool though.
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Posted 10/22/17 , edited 10/22/17

Krissim wrote:


Ibkickin2 wrote:


MonoDreams wrote:

And yet people will still buy spiders for pets.


What kind of an insane person would do this?!

One preparing a spider army.




Do you now?

https://mobile.twitter.com/trintran/status/921986515378380801
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Posted 10/22/17 , edited 10/22/17
Lol every time I see one of those gifs I am reminded of how dim some people can be. A common flight defense for many creatures that are trying to flee when clinging to a higher plane is to fling themselves to the ground. As you can see by all the failed attempts on the internet by people attempting to catch spiders in tiny containers off a walls/ceilings it is super effective though.

I'll admit I personally prefer my mantis army over spiders though. Mantises go right for the face without any coaxing.


Posted 10/22/17 , edited 10/22/17
I’m not scared of no spiders.
I’ll stomp it when I see one.
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Posted 10/22/17 , edited 10/22/17

Krissim wrote:

Lol every time I see one of those gifs I am reminded of how dim some people can be. A common flight defense for many creatures that are trying to flee when clinging to a higher plane is to fling themselves to the ground. As you can see by all the failed attempts on the internet by people attempting to catch spiders in tiny containers off a walls/ceilings it is super effective though.

I'll admit I personally prefer my mantis army over spiders though. Mantises go right for the face without any coaxing.




Literally 5 minutes ago one of these was sitting on my car when I went to it. Look like a dead leaf and freak me out lol.
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