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Post Reply International Dubs Coming to Crunchyroll
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Posted 11/4/17

FlyingFocs wrote:

Rokka is Spanish should be pretty cool given the Mayan/Aztec setting of the world. Granted, I know they didn't speak Spanish, but it's the closest approximation to any modern language in terms of geography. Either way, I know have a new excuse to watch it again.


The real question here is... which Spanish? Will they go for Spain Spanish or Latin America Spanish?

Specially since Yamada-kun is only to be set in USA, Canada, Central and South America. Where be Mexico?!



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Posted 11/5/17 , edited 11/5/17
This is GREAT news ... not only because it shows that Crunchyroll is not just "looking out for North America", but also because it shows that there is somebody with rights outside of North America that is willing to work with Crunchyroll.


ime4gle wrote:


FlyingFocs wrote: Rokka is Spanish should be pretty cool given the Mayan/Aztec setting of the world. Granted, I know they didn't speak Spanish, but it's the closest approximation to any modern language in terms of geography. Either way, I know have a new excuse to watch it again.


The real question here is... which Spanish? Will they go for Spain Spanish or Latin America Spanish?

It's whichever the dub is being done for ... this seems really likely to be Crunchyroll getting rights to use a dub being done as part of another deal (possibly TV, broadcast or cable; possibly disk).


Specially since Yamada-kun is only to be set in USA, Canada, Central and South America. Where be Mexico?!


In the detailed terms of that contract, clearly Mexico is counted as part of Central America, since in the .rss file, mx is part of the territory list.

Yeah, of course, geographically Mexico is the part of Latin America that lies on the North American continent, but, generally, regional labels in contracts mean whatever the licensor says they mean. Regional names are tricky enough in a single language, but anime contracts are bi-lingual ... "Central America" is probably defined in some appendix by simply listing the countries included, just to avoid confusion.


Erebus25 wrote: And if the money is spent on dub when it could be on acquiring more "Japanese dubbed" anime then I think it's a waste in a way, especially if the shows are already available. I don't know the actual prices of course.

I don't understand this sentence. It sounds like you think that there is some hidden pile of money that Crunchyroll uses to "buy" rights, so "picking" one series means it isn't "picking" another one.

Series are (by and large) self-funding. Crunchyroll basically picks up everything that is offered to them at a workable Minimum Guarantee, and getting offered these series is not going to "reduce" the number of subs on Crunchyroll by a single show.
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Posted 11/5/17
Hey! It's been a while since we have a dubbed series here, for Latin America; I think the last one was Saint Seiya
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Posted 11/5/17 , edited 11/14/17
Wonderful news! Now more people around the globe can get tortured with sub-par voice acting and odd phrasing that still doesn't quite match the lip movements! Sorry, but I haven't found a show yet that couldn't be improved by watching it in its native language, anime or otherwise. Japanese, Chinese, Portuguese, Dutch, Finnish...just give me the subs and I'm good.
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Posted 11/5/17 , edited 11/5/17
From my perspective, it's a waste of money, since I always watch JapDub with EngSub, even though english is not my native language. Better use the Dub money for other features.
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Posted 11/5/17

agila61

Erebus25 wrote: And if the money is spent on dub when it could be on acquiring more "Japanese dubbed" anime then I think it's a waste in a way, especially if the shows are already available. I don't know the actual prices of course.

I don't understand this sentence. It sounds like you think that there is some hidden pile of money that Crunchyroll uses to "buy" rights, so "picking" one series means it isn't "picking" another one.

Series are (by and large) self-funding. Crunchyroll basically picks up everything that is offered to them at a workable Minimum Guarantee, and getting offered these series is not going to "reduce" the number of subs on Crunchyroll by a single show.


Well yeah, that's sound logical. You have a limited amount of money which you could use to buy licences for the show and what you don't spend on one you can on the other.

Your explanation could've worked like a year ago when there was no one else in play, now when they have to compete with other streaming services, I don't think it stands.
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Posted 11/5/17

haruhideki wrote:


Erebus25 wrote:


nDroae wrote:

I've been saying for years that I'd watch Attack on Titan in German if a dub existed, even though I hear German dubs are usually terrible.


Erebus25 wrote:

Keep them, get more subbed anime :D


That's a rather discriminatory attitude, trivializing the people who want to watch anime dubbed in their native languages. Obviously there's a long way to go, but those markets deserve investment. Yes, CR primarily deals in Japanese audio with subtitles, but they put up whatever they get. There's value here even for existing anime fans who could use a dub to sell their friends or their kids on anime.

Non-English-dubbed anime has had a big impact in the past. The Spanish dub of the 80's soccer anime Captain Tsubasa inspired boys from Spain, Chile, and Argentina who ultimately became professional players. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Captain_Tsubasa#Reception_and_legacy

And these are subbed if you're watching them in a language you don't speak using English subtitles, as those of us studying languages might want to. I've obtained some Russian-dubbed Ghibli films for that purpose. Just a pet peeve of mine, conflating "sub" with "Japanese audio" and pretending that the original Japanese track isn't itself a dub. Sometimes the only advantage in listening to Japanese dubs is our immunity in our inability to hear how bad Japanese voice acting is. https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/answerman/2016-02-26/.99020 Might as well be any language we don't speak, unless you're a Japanophile who thinks Japanese is the best-sounding language.


While animation is not done like Akira's it's still made with Japanese language in mind. Maybe it's not that big of a difference, but there is one. CR subscribers obviously know how to read, so you are betting on a chance they might wanna share anime with kids. And if the money is spent on dub when it could be on acquiring more "Japanese dubbed" anime then I think it's a waste in a way, especially if the shows are already available. I don't know the actual prices of course.

TV done by another country is a different thing.

The article you linked doesn't say anime acting is bad, just unrealistic at a time because medium itself is unrealistic. There are examples of bad voice acting sure, but it's mostly not. Also I'm not fluent in Japanese, but I do speak it somewhat (N4) so I'm not that ignorant at least.


It is not wasteful to get dubs in another language for other people, when they watch it with their kids then they can just sit down and watch it together. Other people can have kids that are younger and it is easier for them to watch and hear it in their own language instead of just sitting down at a computer reading just the subtitles.

For the Japanese dub I think the point of the article was that when American anime fans watch anime they are not able to judge accurately as someone who knows the differences between acting and voice acting not just by what voice they make, but how they do the voice. It is kind of like how people look at Chinese or Japanese letters and thinks it is "cool" just because it is different, but can not understand anything so everything the good or bad looks the same, since everything looks the same then everything looks "cool". Compared to English where they can at least see the differences in words and the meaning of those words.

A lot of the English voice actors are good, but more then half of the time people are just comparing it to the Japanese voice actors and saying how the Japanese just sound "better", but Japanese and English do NOT sound the same. They are just comparing the differences in noise, but not really judging how well the actors are actually giving the performance. kind of like if two people baked cupcakes and one was strawberry and the other was chocolate, and the judge said the chocolate cupcake was bad because it did not taste like strawberry. It was not judged on how the cupcakes were baked or the other ingredients they used, but just the flavor difference of chocolate and strawberry and thinking strawberry is better then chocolate. A good or bad strawberry cupcake is still strawberry so the judge thinks it is better then any kind of chocolate. You can like strawberries more then chocolate, but it does not mean that the chocolate cupcake was a bad cupcake.


About the article, what you said is true, but the article also does state that voice acting in popular anime is not bad. And most of people in west, especially new to the medium don't go far from the popular anime. So I don't agree with nDroae's opinion that people just like Japanese dub more because they can't hear how bad Japanes dubs are.
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Posted 11/5/17

SnowFox wrote:

Sorry, but I haven't found a show yet that couldn't be improved by watching it in its native language, anime or otherwise. Japanese, Chinese, Portuguese, Dutch, Finnish...just give me the subs and I'm good.

Fortunately, the availability of these dubs won't magically make the subs for those shows disappear, so you're still good.

CR doesn't have to be all about what one person or group of people prefers. CR gets a number of shows each season I have no interest in, but you don't see me complaining about that because I realize there are people that are interested in them, and more people retaining by CR or more new people coming to CR benefits me in the long run.




Erebus25 wrote:

Your explanation could've worked like a year ago when there was no one else in play, now when they have to compete with other streaming services, I don't think it stands.

The explanation is still valid. For it to be invalid, CR would have to be paying more for titles than they could hope to recoup, which is a losing proposition. Services that are trying to expand can often use that strategy, although thus far it hasn't proved successfully in the long run. (That said, those services didn't have the deep pockets of Amazon or Netflix, or the established subscriber base of the latter).

Your argument also assumes that simply overspending to acquire titles would bring in as many or more users as providing dubs in native language.
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Posted 11/5/17

TheAncientOne

Erebus25 wrote:

Your explanation could've worked like a year ago when there was no one else in play, now when they have to compete with other streaming services, I don't think it stands.

The explanation is still valid. For it to be invalid, CR would have to be paying more for titles than they could hope to recoup, which is a losing proposition. Services that are trying to expand can often use that strategy, although thus far it hasn't proved successfully in the long run. (That said, those services didn't have the deep pockets of Amazon or Netflix, or the established subscriber base of the latter).

Your argument also assumes that simply overspending to acquire titles would bring in as many or more users as providing dubs in native language.


So licences aren't really sold, they are "lent" to the distributor for a percentage and they pay themselves off?
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Posted 11/5/17

Erebus25 wrote:

So licences aren't really sold, they are "lent" to the distributor for a percentage and they pay themselves off?

Typically a minimum guarantee is involved, and if the number of views exceed that, then a royalty system would come into play. As such, there is normally a specific amount of money that is paid up front. That is where the "bidding" normally comes into play. If a licensor sets up a contract that has a minimum guarantee based on a 150,000 views, they don't have to refund any of that money if the licensee only gets half that number. That doesn't stop a licensor from asking for a larger MG than they expect the licensee would ever exceed, or the licensee from offering it in order to grab a title from a competitor (which would effectively be overbidding).

I wouldn't be surprised if these days most titles never garner the views to match their minimum guarantee, but without delving into the secret internal accounting of businesses, we may never know for certain.


A service could afford to make no money or even lose a bit on a "tentpole" title or two each season, as long as they make it up on those that are less popular, but simply paying whatever is necessary to acquire every popular title (some of which won't live up to expectations), is a surefire way to lose money.

Even with Amazon and Netflix, which could afford to lose money on anime for quite a while, the day will come when those operations have to show a contribution to the bottom line or they will be cut. For less well funded operations, it had typically been about 9 months before they either ceased operations or largely faded as a competitive threat. I would expect Amazon and Netflix to stick with it for at least 2-3 years, even if their anime operations are losing money the entire time.
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Posted 11/5/17

Erebus25 wrote:


haruhideki wrote:


Erebus25 wrote:


nDroae wrote:

I've been saying for years that I'd watch Attack on Titan in German if a dub existed, even though I hear German dubs are usually terrible.


Erebus25 wrote:

Keep them, get more subbed anime :D


That's a rather discriminatory attitude, trivializing the people who want to watch anime dubbed in their native languages. Obviously there's a long way to go, but those markets deserve investment. Yes, CR primarily deals in Japanese audio with subtitles, but they put up whatever they get. There's value here even for existing anime fans who could use a dub to sell their friends or their kids on anime.

Non-English-dubbed anime has had a big impact in the past. The Spanish dub of the 80's soccer anime Captain Tsubasa inspired boys from Spain, Chile, and Argentina who ultimately became professional players. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Captain_Tsubasa#Reception_and_legacy

And these are subbed if you're watching them in a language you don't speak using English subtitles, as those of us studying languages might want to. I've obtained some Russian-dubbed Ghibli films for that purpose. Just a pet peeve of mine, conflating "sub" with "Japanese audio" and pretending that the original Japanese track isn't itself a dub. Sometimes the only advantage in listening to Japanese dubs is our immunity in our inability to hear how bad Japanese voice acting is. https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/answerman/2016-02-26/.99020 Might as well be any language we don't speak, unless you're a Japanophile who thinks Japanese is the best-sounding language.


While animation is not done like Akira's it's still made with Japanese language in mind. Maybe it's not that big of a difference, but there is one. CR subscribers obviously know how to read, so you are betting on a chance they might wanna share anime with kids. And if the money is spent on dub when it could be on acquiring more "Japanese dubbed" anime then I think it's a waste in a way, especially if the shows are already available. I don't know the actual prices of course.

TV done by another country is a different thing.

The article you linked doesn't say anime acting is bad, just unrealistic at a time because medium itself is unrealistic. There are examples of bad voice acting sure, but it's mostly not. Also I'm not fluent in Japanese, but I do speak it somewhat (N4) so I'm not that ignorant at least.


It is not wasteful to get dubs in another language for other people, when they watch it with their kids then they can just sit down and watch it together. Other people can have kids that are younger and it is easier for them to watch and hear it in their own language instead of just sitting down at a computer reading just the subtitles.

For the Japanese dub I think the point of the article was that when American anime fans watch anime they are not able to judge accurately as someone who knows the differences between acting and voice acting not just by what voice they make, but how they do the voice. It is kind of like how people look at Chinese or Japanese letters and thinks it is "cool" just because it is different, but can not understand anything so everything the good or bad looks the same, since everything looks the same then everything looks "cool". Compared to English where they can at least see the differences in words and the meaning of those words.

A lot of the English voice actors are good, but more then half of the time people are just comparing it to the Japanese voice actors and saying how the Japanese just sound "better", but Japanese and English do NOT sound the same. They are just comparing the differences in noise, but not really judging how well the actors are actually giving the performance. kind of like if two people baked cupcakes and one was strawberry and the other was chocolate, and the judge said the chocolate cupcake was bad because it did not taste like strawberry. It was not judged on how the cupcakes were baked or the other ingredients they used, but just the flavor difference of chocolate and strawberry and thinking strawberry is better then chocolate. A good or bad strawberry cupcake is still strawberry so the judge thinks it is better then any kind of chocolate. You can like strawberries more then chocolate, but it does not mean that the chocolate cupcake was a bad cupcake.


About the article, what you said is true, but the article also does state that voice acting in popular anime is not bad. And most of people in west, especially new to the medium don't go far from the popular anime. So I don't agree with nDroae's opinion that people just like Japanese dub more because they can't hear how bad Japanes dubs are.

Ok, I think nDroae's is not saying the popular anime dubs are bad, but that because normal english speaking people cannot tell the difference even if it was bad. I think he is saying it is a benefit how we can just watch it and think everything sounds good, because we do not understand it enough to know if it was bad. Or at least we are less sensitive to it.
An example I think is something like accents, If there was a Japanese person doing a Japanese country accent, would we even know if was a bad or good Japanese country accent? or if they did a accent at all? would we care? we would probably just think the person was just talking normally just like any other Japanese person or it was just a different character talking.
So, I would not say it is the only reason why some anime fans would want to watch it in Japanese, there can be other reasons, but it is just something english anime fans would not complain about it.
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Posted 11/5/17
If a show is available in my region, can I listen to it with any available audio language and any available subtitle language or am I limited to the languages of my region?
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Posted 11/5/17 , edited 11/5/17

sickVisionz wrote:

If a show is available in my region, can I listen to it with any available audio language and any available subtitle language or am I limited to the languages of my region?

As mentioned in the announcement, any available language for the first two titles for the regions they are available in, but for Schwarzes Marken, the language(s) available depend on the region.

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Posted 11/5/17 , edited 11/6/17
This is cool, but it'd be nice to get the English dubs for some of the shows they already have as well. Parasyte and Dragon Ball Super are two shows I would have especially preferred to watch in English. I appreciate these things can be complicated though.
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Posted 11/6/17 , edited 11/8/17

StoneCross wrote:

This is cool, but it'd be nice to get the English dubs for some of the shows they already have as well. Parasyte and Dragon Ball Super are two shows I would have especially preferred to watch in English. I appreciate these things can be complicated though.

With the "dubs for Funimation, subs for CR" arrangement, you're not likely to see too much of that.

Parasyte is a Sentai license, and even when they were on good terms with CR, CR didn't get their dubs. In fact, it varied over time whether even The Anime Network would get them. Thankfully HIDIVE is better in that regard, and they do have the dub of the series, although oddly the video only seems to be the TV broadcast version instead of the home video version:



This was odd enough I had to check that I was logged in. Even in the days of The Anime Network, dubs seemed to invariably be the home video version. Perhaps it has something to do with the series being broadcast on Toonami here in the US.
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