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Post Reply Things you wish you had known before starting college
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Posted 11/8/17 , edited 11/8/17

Austershalin wrote:

A few things: applied to more scholarships (could have more or even all my tuition covered), fully understood the curriculum (could have finished my degree in 3 years, instead of the regular 4), and more internships (did 2, but could have done 1 more for additional work experience).


This is actually what I try to tell people who are entering college for the first time.
I have been able to get several degrees a year or two earlier just by understanding the curriculum and how to navigate it.
Internships are the best and easiest way to gain work experience while in college, from my experience.

If I had to go back and tell my younger self before he started college I would tell him to not worry about relationships, to focus on the task at hand and don't worry about being social at all.
I've had more than enough time to party, have fun, chill, and enjoy myself after getting out of college that I feel like I could have done better in college if I had just ignored the "outside factors".
In terms of experience and knowledge outside of the classroom, I learned nothing that I didn't already know.
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Posted 11/8/17 , edited 11/8/17

mxdan wrote:

Study an hour a day per class, take one day off to have fun, and get to know how your professors think.


An hour a day per class?

Hahahahaahahahahahahahahaah next your gunna say an apple a day keeps the doctor away.



Study whatever time you require in order to complete what you need to do/ get the grade you are seeking in the course.(if you need to study more then put in more time, if less then less)

it's all about managing your time well so you don't become overwhelmed when projects or deadlines all line up around the same time

Sticking to some arbitrary number such as 1 hour per class per day will do absolutely nothing in terms of helping you manage your time effectively.

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Posted 11/8/17 , edited 11/8/17

amejia0 wrote:
Study whatever time you require in order to complete what you need to do/ get the grade you are seeking in the course.(if you need to study more then put in more time, if less then less)

it's all about managing your time well so you don't become overwhelmed when projects or deadlines all line up around the same time

Sticking to some arbitrary number such as 1 hour per class per day will do absolutely nothing in terms of helping you manage your time effectively.



I would say both are pretty accurate.
YMMV, basically.
Some students are better at creating an arbitrary number to force themselves to adhere to than to have the self-awareness to gauge exactly how much time they require for each course.
I haven't studied since middle school (when I was already taking AP STEM courses at a local high school).
With that said, your views resonate more with me (study less if you need to study less, more if you need more) more than defining an allotment of time.

Even though I am older now, I still stick to the "one book a day" rule that I gave myself in high school.
For example, the current book I'm reading is "Agile Product Management with Scrum: Creating Products that Customers Love".
Tomorrow, I will be reading "The Product Manager's Desk Reference" and finishing off Stephen King's "11/22/63".
It is an arbitrary number but it can also be seen as the "bare minimum" and can expand beyond it based on your time management.

So yeah, you're both correct as to methods that help you out in college (and adulthood).
Just from different ideologies/perspectives on what works for you both, as individuals.
mxdan 
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Posted 11/8/17 , edited 11/8/17

amejia0 wrote:


mxdan wrote:

Study an hour a day per class, take one day off to have fun, and get to know how your professors think.


An hour a day per class?

Hahahahaahahahahahahahahaah next your gunna say an apple a day keeps the doctor away.



Study whatever time you require in order to complete what you need to do/ get the grade you are seeking in the course.(if you need to study more then put in more time, if less then less)

it's all about managing your time well so you don't become overwhelmed when projects or deadlines all line up around the same time

Sticking to some arbitrary number such as 1 hour per class per day will do absolutely nothing in terms of helping you manage your time effectively.



Mate, if i don't adhere to a strict study schedule I don't study at all.

With that said I agree with you. It's just some of us need to establish rules because our brains work differently. And really, as you age, intelligent routine is pretty correlational to success. Not imperative but I find the people who keep healthy routine to be more often than not the ones you can bet on to find success throughout their life. Again, not everyone, but there is a pretty defined gradient.

P.S. I eat a Grapefruit almost every morning, does that count?
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Posted 11/8/17 , edited 11/8/17
In engineering, the rule is you need to spend two to three hours outside of class on the coursework for every hour you spend in class. It's a huge time sink and I wasn't ready to make it as an undergrad.

I took way too many classes, graduating double major at a top public university. My GPA though... that's a little embarrassing, and it hurt my chances getting into a good grad school after working a few years. Once I finish my thesis, it's back into the workforce I go.

I think I was lucky to have some valuable life experiences when I got to grad school that improved my work ethic and living habits. If I can publish a paper, it will improve my chances of finding a better job when I have to go job hunting again.
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118 / M / USA
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Posted 11/8/17 , edited 11/8/17
I wish I would had known what major I was actually going to do and stick with. (Went from a music education major to a computer science major) Being a music major was fun but it added about 2 extra years I didn't need in college. I wish I would have known that having relationships can be a huge distraction and you should probably just focus on getting good grades and getting your crap together while in college. Also not to worry about what your parents think because they haven't been in college since the stone age and don't know anything about it now. I guess the last thing would be that I wish I knew it was okay to make mistakes and be confused but you need to figure out the best way to break it down to learn certain things even if that means at a way slower pace than everyone else. If you let everything overwhelm you it just ends up taking even more time and with less knowledge gained out of the situation.
qwueri 
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Posted 11/8/17 , edited 11/8/17
I would say have a clearer idea of what I wanted to do once I got outside of college and focus on those studies, but then I still don't have a solid idea on that so...
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Posted 11/8/17 , edited 11/9/17
Accept that college is the new high school. You will need a college degree to get a reasonable job (barring luck or a desire to go in a few particular fields).

Understand that college will probably not be sufficient to advance so learn the basics in two fields so when you go to grad/law/medical school, you are not a one-trick pony.

To get a good job, plan on getting an advanced degree (unless you go engineering). I have found that a Ph.D. and MBA (or Ph.D. and J.D) will provide a solid foundation.

eiboog 
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Posted 11/10/17 , edited 11/10/17
The 400 level CS and Math courses are the absolute worst, but don'y worry because the majority of programming jobs don't even use that material. Try and be happier in general and just know that the average CS student is going to be... different. Also don't get so worked up when you realize half the class has been cheating and no one thought to try and help you out. I hated college, but I'm happy now that I graduated and got a job in my field.
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22 / F / Dominican Republic
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Posted 11/10/17 , edited 11/10/17
It gets more expensive as you go.
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Posted 11/10/17 , edited 11/10/17
As a rule, people in the humanities are degenerates. The culture they are trying to teach you is based on secular humanism and postmodernism. Don't 'follow your dreams'.
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Posted 11/22/17 , edited 11/22/17
First, the job market might change during 4 or more years, so the job you thought you would be training for, might not exist when you graduate. So, though focus is generally good, you can't be too focused or specialized. You need to build some general purpose skills as well. I would recommend communication courses. People who can talk the talk (sound like they know what they are doing) , seem to make more money than people who can walk the walk (know what they are doing). Plus, if you get any good, you will find yourself constantly making presentations to bosses, clients or investors. Additionally, keep on eye on courses that would be helpful if you eventually start your own business.

When doing team assignments, do all the work yourself. Your teammates will fail you 100% of the time.

Everything takes longer than you think, so time management is problematic when your time estimates are crazy wrong.

College can give you access to the largest dating pool of your lifetime, chuck full of ambitious people with enough money to pay tuition. But not if you go to an all boys or all girls school.

Avoid sororities, fraternities, sports and clubs as they are all time sucks, unless you are looking for social opportunities.

You are going to get stuck with a lot of expensive text books. The professors publish new editions of their books every year so they have no resell value. Borrowing textbooks from the library is impractical as it is unlikely to be available when you need it.

Make as many college friends as humanly possible. When you eventually start your own business, you can touch them up for money.
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Posted 11/23/17 , edited 11/23/17

ironh19 wrote:

save your money and dont go, complete waste of time. I got 2 degrees and dont use either of them.
Wisest words on here. Seriously, if you're thinking about going, just get a workforce certificate. Unless you're wanting to start your own business or trying to get high up in a business, don't even bother. Most cubicle paper pushing desk jobs can be done by 8th graders. I got my workforce certs in Welding and am happy as can be.

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Posted 11/23/17 , edited 11/23/17
If I could go back and do it differently i would. Colleges don't teach shit anymore. if you can go out and develop a specific skill that will benefit you far more than a degree.
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Posted 11/23/17 , edited 11/23/17

animegirl2222 wrote:

it’s fucking expensive


This.

Also I didn’t realize at the time my degree was useless and my art wast what the industry is looking for. so I am paying for it. Think twice about art school and private colleges. It’s nothing but trouble.
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