Post Reply Did any one else grow up as a selective mute?
1003 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
M / UK
Offline
Posted 12/12/17 , edited 12/12/17
I mean when I say selective mute, the doctors said it could have been my Asperger’s and anxiety problems. It was sort of a defence mechanism. I avoided talking to most people. Avoided getting in to music, hobbies or talking about stuff I did like. I guess so people wouldn’t hate me?

I’m pretty socially stunted and don’t leave the house on my own. I have depression too.

Not sure it was worth it.
745 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
18
Offline
Posted 12/12/17 , edited 12/12/17
can't relate but we all have our own problems
Posted 12/12/17 , edited 12/12/17
Yeah I was selectively mute I've chosen not to speak to 99% of the planet
1274 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
30 / M / Kansas, USA
Offline
Posted 12/12/17 , edited 12/13/17
Antisocial Personality Disorder, rather than selective mutism--and I think the two get confused. An aspect of the former is that one chooses not to socialize, and the other, for psychological reasons, can't.
15817 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / AH / Helipad
Offline
Posted 12/12/17 , edited 12/12/17
I've always been quiet, but no I was not a select mute as a child.
28059 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
22 / M / Prison
Offline
Posted 12/12/17 , edited 12/13/17

PandAndy wrote:

Antisocial Personality Disorder, rather than selective mutism--and I think the two get confused. An aspect of the former is that one chooses not to socialize, and the other, for psychological reasons, can't.


That seems more of just a symptom than of the illness. In any case, I also believe Antisocial Personality Disorder is not the same as being asocial, or any of those disorder, but a specific mental disorder character by a callous disregard for other without remorse or regret. It is often associated with psychopathy.
9726 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Unhatched / Egg / 卵
Offline
Posted 12/12/17 , edited 12/12/17
I can relate greatly in all aspects; asperger's/autism, anxiety, depression, selective mutism et al. My only outlet of true self expression has been the internet over the course of over 20 years. It's only within recent times that I've been opening up and talking. It's all thanks to my sweetheart. They make me feel so comfortable that I've been able to get over it with them and it's spreading to my socialisation with others, too.

For me, I would talk, but in a way that was actually to avoid talking. I would never share anything about myself, but I would make jokes non-stop and talk about topics like current events and other ongoing of the surroundings. I talked to avoid the attention being silent would bring, but I wanted to be silent, and when I could, I would go days without talking, weeks of you take out the forced conversations I have to have with my family.

Whether it's true mutism or not doesn't really matter, point is I can still relate to OP.
1274 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
30 / M / Kansas, USA
Offline
Posted 12/25/17 , edited 12/26/17

PeripheralVisionary wrote:


PandAndy wrote:

Antisocial Personality Disorder, rather than selective mutism--and I think the two get confused. An aspect of the former is that one chooses not to socialize, and the other, for psychological reasons, can't.


That seems more of just a symptom than of the illness. In any case, I also believe Antisocial Personality Disorder is not the same as being asocial, or any of those disorder, but a specific mental disorder character by a callous disregard for other without remorse or regret. It is often associated with psychopathy.


That's more of a result of several personality disorders being lumped into spectrums. ASPD is inclusive of varying degrees of different characteristics that used to be attributed to "psychopathy," "sociopathy," and "narcissism," to name a few (antisocial personality was once its own designation, as well.) ASPD is, in that sense, associated to psychopathy BECAUSE psychopathy is within its spectrum of classifications, but the medical field no longer clearly differentiates. In lay terms, I have strong sociopathic tendencies--that's not saying "hey, I'mma just pop out to the corner and strangle a hooker" or something. It means I lack empathy or, more pointedly, that I A. don't often understand others' emotional reactions and B. can't respond to them. In short, sociopaths have a very limited range of "feeling" that isn't hinged on societal norms--which are also less definite for us. Other than that, I'm prone to impulsive and self-serving decisions and am very capable of acting to expectations--or, rather, seeming "normal"--(and often do.) There are other differences, such as sociopathy being a conditioned trait, rather than inherent, but do keep in mind that ASPD does not explicitly indicate psychopathy, which is characterized by the traits you have noted.
You must be logged in to post.