Post Reply Survey: 11% of British children have taken part in game-related gambling
3557 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Offline
Posted 12/12/17
Do you think the % will be higher for the North America region? I guess we do gamble in some way without realizing it .


https://www.gamasutra.com/view/news/311518/Survey_11_of_British_children_have_taken_part_in_gamerelated_gambling.php

You can read more about the survey here
http://live-gamblecom.cloud.contensis.com/PDF/survey-data/Young-People-and-Gambling-2017-Report.pdf


1309 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
M
Offline
Posted 12/12/17

dulun18 wrote:
Do you think the % will be higher for the North America region? I guess we do gamble in some way without realizing it .


Not really.
The infograph that you've posted focuses on online gambling.
In North America, it's not as easy to purchase lottery tickets online as it is in the United Kingdom.
In the UK, you just need access to your parent's account (which has their ID registered on it).
In North America, there are only a handful of states in the United States that permits purchase of lottery tickets online (I think Illinois and Georgia are the only ones).
Canada follows a similar logic as the United Kingdom, so that may impact the numbers a little bit.

The biggest hit would be "online gambling-style games".
In the era of social media, Facebook has a lot of games that focus on card games (even as minigames for kids) where you wager in-game currency or items that you have in-game to get more (minigame gambling).
The infograph of "in-game items (in computer games/apps)" has a very specific meaning according to the survey you based this on:


This section is a new addition to the 2017 survey to explore awareness of and participation in ‘skins betting’ among young people20. ‘Skins’ are in-game items, used within some of the most popular video game titles. They provide cosmetic alterations to a player’s weapons, avatar or equipment used in the game. Skins betting sites allow video gamers to wager cosmetic items rewarded in-game or purchased for real money on a digital marketplace, accessible from the UK for several years.

The Gambling Commission takes the view that the ability to convert in-game items to cash, or to trade them (for other items of value) means they attain a real-world value and become articles of money or money’s worth. Where gambling facilities are offered to British consumers, including with the use of in-game items that can be converted into cash or traded (for items of value), a gambling licence is required. Tackling operators making gambling facilities available to children is one of the Gambling Commission’s priorities. This has been demonstrated by action taken against unlicensed websites providing facilities for gambling using in-game items as methods for payment.

For the purposes of thissurvey,with the aim of ensuring as much comprehension of the activity as possible,the topic was introduced to young people as follows: ‘When playing computer games/apps it is sometimes possible to collect in-game items (eg weapons, power-ups and tokens). For some games, it is possible to bet these in-game items for the chance to win more of them.’


In other words, "loot crates" and "microtransactions" would not be lumped into this category.
You would have to wager in-game items to get more (like I mentioned around social media sites) or have a method of converting your gains to real life cash.
In the United States, the gambling commission is pretty strict on games that focus on real-life currency being used to wage in a betting system (like online poker).
At the same time, they don't focus much on "in-game items to in-game items" conversion that targets children as much.

So I would say that the numbers would be lower in the United States, about the same in Canada.
If you use data from both, it would be marginally higher than that of the United Kingdom due to population size alone.
15865 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Online
Posted 12/12/17
Anything defined broadly enough will cover children, especially 11-16 year olds filling out a self-survey "under supervision". The terrible secret is that everything is gambling. You can no more avoid gambling than you can avoid consuming matter to extend your vital functions.
22866 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
The White House
Offline
Posted 12/12/17
Gambling is fine as long as your using excess money or change. Just don't spend big because you will always lose.

Heck I used to gamble trading cards and pokemon.
37813 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Offline
Posted 12/12/17
I've been gambling for as long as I can remember. Poker with my family, mostly. Never much money, but poker was a tradition on holidays.

Gambling is highly regulated in the US. Online gambling in particular has existed in a legal grey area for a long time. All that casino money must buy good lobbyists.
3557 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Offline
Posted 12/13/17

Cydoemus wrote:

Not really.
The infograph that you've posted focuses on online gambling.


There's a portion for "in-game items"
1309 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
M
Offline
Posted 12/13/17

dulun18 wrote:

There's a portion for "in-game items"


Yes, gambling in-game items for more in-game items.
It is a corner scenario that doesn't exist in most games any more.
Yet again, another scenario where the government will never truly be able to manage to monitor and sort through any sort of "gambling" for video games - simply because by the time they pass any legislature, the industry has already moved onto something else.
The whole principle of "in-game items wager for more in-game items" is the premise of encouraging gambling behavior into children.
It's like playing POGS in the 90's, you'd have to wager a few of your POGS in each game.
Winner gets to take home the POGS that were put aside for the winner.
That's the kind of mentality they were addressing with "in-game items".
3961 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
F / BuBbLeS!
Offline
Posted 12/13/17
I suppose that's about right, either way. in some online gaming sites, such as pogo, underage and playing on your parent's game you can gamble (there are expansion parts of the site as well as these games where you can bet real money instead of digital money), and there are other gaming sites. and with the new fantasy football thing, as well as online gaming, it's only a matter of time before those numbers rise in the states. minus those who fake their age in the first place to get onto a site of course.
You must be logged in to post.