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Post Reply What does it take to write good poetry?
mxdan 
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Posted 1/10/18 , edited 1/10/18

mitochondriaCell wrote:

Yes, wanted to be a writer for a long time. However but because of time and certain pathways I chose in life, I don't have much time for it at this moment. However I do think about it greatly from time to time. If I do go back to writing I'd make damn sure I'd say something relevant and that could subtly propose alternatives in my writing.

A ted talk from this woman summises what I mean.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UPk56BR1Cmk
skips to 6:10:

https://youtu.be/UPk56BR1Cmk?t=6m10s

After many years I find myself feeling most rewarded when I align myself heavily with the values presented at 6:10 in the ted talk.


Oh, I see what you did there.


More to the point, I've had many mentors over the years in writing (I hope to be a published one someday). My mother (A writer), being one of them, taught me that you only have to be honest and love what you do to be a good writer. I stand by that. Even if you are awful you are still a good writer. Trust me when I say there are far more bad ones in the core of what they do. I met many of them at university >_>...

With that said all I can say is that one pattern I've noticed in great writers is the ability to show something instead of telling it. There is a big difference. Anyone can tell you about the time they went to the dentist and had a bad experience, but can you really show someone why it was bad in a way that makes their nervous system respond?

Great writers are able to engage many areas of the body through words. Bad ones don't get past the temporal lobe. But the truly outstanding ones know how to build on that engagement and break through walls. They make you disappear without you realizing it.

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Posted 1/10/18 , edited 1/10/18

mxdan wrote:


mitochondriaCell wrote:

Yes, wanted to be a writer for a long time. However but because of time and certain pathways I chose in life, I don't have much time for it at this moment. However I do think about it greatly from time to time. If I do go back to writing I'd make damn sure I'd say something relevant and that could subtly propose alternatives in my writing.

A ted talk from this woman summises what I mean.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UPk56BR1Cmk
skips to 6:10:

https://youtu.be/UPk56BR1Cmk?t=6m10s

After many years I find myself feeling most rewarded when I align myself heavily with the values presented at 6:10 in the ted talk.


Oh, I see what you did there.


More to the point, I've had many mentors over the years in writing (I hope to be a published one someday). My mother (A writer), being one of them, taught me that you only have to be honest and love what you do to be a good writer. I stand by that. Even if you are awful you are still a good writer. Trust me when I say there are far more bad ones in the core of what they do. I met many of them at university >_>...

With that said all I can say is that one pattern I've noticed in great writers is the ability to show something instead of telling it. There is a big difference. Anyone can tell you about the time they went to the dentist and had a bad experience, but can you really show someone why it was bad in a way that makes their nervous system respond?

Great writers are able to engage many areas of the body through words. Bad ones don't get past the temporal lobe. But the truly outstanding ones know how to build on that engagement and break through walls. They make you disappear without you realizing it.



Pretty much agree! Btw glad to see you have a small knowledge of neurobiology it can be quite useful. :)

mxdan 
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Posted 1/10/18 , edited 1/11/18

mitochondriaCell wrote:


mxdan wrote:


mitochondriaCell wrote:

Yes, wanted to be a writer for a long time. However but because of time and certain pathways I chose in life, I don't have much time for it at this moment. However I do think about it greatly from time to time. If I do go back to writing I'd make damn sure I'd say something relevant and that could subtly propose alternatives in my writing.

A ted talk from this woman summises what I mean.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UPk56BR1Cmk
skips to 6:10:

https://youtu.be/UPk56BR1Cmk?t=6m10s

After many years I find myself feeling most rewarded when I align myself heavily with the values presented at 6:10 in the ted talk.


Oh, I see what you did there.


More to the point, I've had many mentors over the years in writing (I hope to be a published one someday). My mother (A writer), being one of them, taught me that you only have to be honest and love what you do to be a good writer. I stand by that. Even if you are awful you are still a good writer. Trust me when I say there are far more bad ones in the core of what they do. I met many of them at university >_>...

With that said all I can say is that one pattern I've noticed in great writers is the ability to show something instead of telling it. There is a big difference. Anyone can tell you about the time they went to the dentist and had a bad experience, but can you really show someone why it was bad in a way that makes their nervous system respond?

Great writers are able to engage many areas of the body through words. Bad ones don't get past the temporal lobe. But the truly outstanding ones know how to build on that engagement and break through walls. They make you disappear without you realizing it.



Pretty much agree! Btw glad to see you have a small knowledge of neurobiology it can be quite useful. :)


Cheers man ^_^. My degree is actually in biology haha. My passion is in writing though through and through.
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Posted 1/10/18 , edited 1/11/18
Apparently it's the ability to articulate and express suffering really well along with the aid of the trifecta (alcohol,cigarettes,coffee)
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