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Worst/Dumbest anime names?
nDroae 
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Posted 1/15/18 , edited 1/16/18
Attack on Titan is a bad title. Most likely, when you first heard it, either you thought it was bad (and perhaps since forgot); or you were already so used to Engrish that you accepted it without much thought.

I thought Sword Art Online was Engrish at first. For years I thought the title referred to the aesthetic art of sword design, which makes the in-game blacksmithing process ironic, as it's devoid of creative input. I think it was just last year that it occurred to me that the title might refer to the art of swordfighting, or "the way of the sword." Still sounds awkward to me.

OP, since your reaction to anything in Japanese seems to be "What?" here are a couple for you to chew on:

/utawarerumono
(AKA Underwater Ray Romano)

/sengokuchojyugiga
(Listed on MAL as Sengoku Choujuu Giga, but here it's SENGOKUCHOJYUGIGA)
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Posted 1/15/18 , edited 1/16/18

nDroae wrote:

Attack on Titan is a bad title. Most likely, when you first heard it, either you thought it was bad (and perhaps since forgot); or you were already so used to Engrish that you accepted it without much thought.

I thought Sword Art Online was Engrish at first. For years I thought the title referred to the aesthetic art of sword design, which makes the in-game blacksmithing process ironic, as it's devoid of creative input. I think it was just last year that it occurred to me that the title might refer to the art of swordfighting, or "the way of the sword." Still sounds awkward to me.


AoT and SAO are meant to sound catchy and exciting for English speakers and if you ask me, I think they did their job. SAO in particular isn't even a translation since that's the actual title. AoT on the other hand, well there's a problem with that translation but it involves a manga spoiler...
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Posted 1/15/18 , edited 1/16/18

nDroae wrote:

Attack on Titan is a bad title. Most likely, when you first heard it, either you thought it was bad (and perhaps since forgot); or you were already so used to Engrish that you accepted it without much thought.


you're right, the first time I heard it I figured there was a town called Titan.

Considering the titans are attacking, the name is grammatically incorrect.

the Japanese name is Shingeki no Kyojin which would translate to Attack of Giants

were they afraid of trademark disputes with Wrath of the Titans?

I'm sure they could have come up with a better name.
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Posted 1/15/18 , edited 1/16/18

marklebid wrote:

The names come from the original Japanese sources. Titles are intended to grab your (or rather the original Japanese audience's) attention, not describe the series. My Love Story's name is even more generic in Japanese: 'My Story.'

For Darling, Gamers, Kingdom: In Japanese they stand out because they're using "English" via katakana. If most series are assumed to have Japanese names, these have "foreign" names. Taking English and moving it back into English turns out to not always be exciting for us.

Pop Team Epic is the overblown name of a 4-panel comic strip, now converted into an anime. It was always supposed to be a ridiculous name.

Dagashi kashi is also word play. It literally means cheap snacks, or something like dime-store candy. But if you change it to Daga shikashi, it becomes a phrase often used in manga and anime, an emphatic "But no!" or "But wait!" "Dime-store candy" sounds way more boring to me, and also doesn't make sense to young people who don't know what a dime store is. So to update it, "99-cent Store Candy"? Keeping the original makes the most sense.

Nisekoi is an example of phrases condensed into "new words." Nisemono no koi (fake/pretend love) is shortened to NiseKoi. Japanese culture tends to prefer shorter names and abbreviations. Especially for media -- it's easier to discuss if you don't have to write the whole thing.

Related is the recent 'intentionally overlong title' designed to be shortened, starting with "My Little Sister Can't be This Cute" from Ore no imouto ha konna ni kawaii wake ja nai turning into just "Ore Imo." For marketing, you stand out by having a crazy long name, but also benefit by the short name.

Aho-girl means idiot-girl. It stands out in Japanese by being such a plain insult. Translating it to English reduces its appeal for English audiences. Talk about being awkward to communicate: "Oh I love the show 'Idiot Girl'." Seems like you're more likely to be considered chauvinist or talking about a Western cartoon aimed at kids. If you watch it subbed, anyone quickly learns the word 'aho.'

Chihayafuru is the most interesting, but still the original Japanese. The main character is Chihaya, with 'furu' being word play like 'colorful', 'playful' etc. A lot of the focus is on a card game English-speaking audiences don't know about, so adding the game into the title isn't helpful. It defies English translation, and is interesting enough on its own. So it stays the same.



pretty much all of this, it seems the names are to captivate the viewers mind and grab the attention
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Posted 1/15/18 , edited 1/15/18
Little Busters. It’s my favorite show ever, but seriously it sounds like one of those educational toddler shows...

Utawarerumono...I just don’t like how hard it is to remember really.

K-On.

Is this a Zombie of the Dead?

Any anything that has zero in it for no feasible reason other than trying to sound cool.

Wincest titles are fine though since it is the best.



nDroae 
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Posted 1/15/18 , edited 1/16/18

PhantomGundam wrote:


nDroae wrote:

Attack on Titan is a bad title. Most likely, when you first heard it, either you thought it was bad (and perhaps since forgot); or you were already so used to Engrish that you accepted it without much thought.

I thought Sword Art Online was Engrish at first. For years I thought the title referred to the aesthetic art of sword design, which makes the in-game blacksmithing process ironic, as it's devoid of creative input. I think it was just last year that it occurred to me that the title might refer to the art of swordfighting, or "the way of the sword." Still sounds awkward to me.


AoT and SAO are meant to sound catchy and exciting for English speakers and if you ask me, I think they did their job. SAO in particular isn't even a translation since that's the actual title. AoT on the other hand, well there's a problem with that translation but it involves a manga spoiler...


"Attack on Titan" certainly works fine once you get used to it.

I don't think either was originally meant for English speakers; English is hip in Japan. An American equivalent "cool foreign title" is Daikatana. By the way, a long time ago I was told that title mashed together two forms of Japanese in a way that would never happen in Japan. (?)

In the case of Attack on Titan, author Hajime Isayama is obviously a westaboo (I'm not saying that derogatively, I'm glad that's a thing) with his eurocentric setting, and apparently he was the one who wanted the English title to be Attack on Titan.


HOOfan_1 wrote:

you're right, the first time I heard it I figured there was a town called Titan.

Considering the titans are attacking, the name is grammatically incorrect.

the Japanese name is Shingeki no Kyojin which would translate to Attack of Giants

were they afraid of trademark disputes with Wrath of the Titans?

I'm sure they could have come up with a better name.


I don't have a problem with "titan," because it sounds awesome; but actually, shingeki doesn't mean "attack" in Japanese:
https://anime.stackexchange.com/questions/11370/why-is-shingeki-no-kyojin-translated-as-attack-on-titan

Then again... who says a subtitle has to mean the same thing as the main title?

My primary problem is that in English, if there's a titan walking around, we're not going to call it "Titan," as if that's its proper name. We're going to call it "a titan" or "the titan." But "Attack on the Titan(s)" actually sounds less cool, doesn't it? "Against the Titans" would get Hollywood approval. Regardless, the franchise's massive success in the west proves (again) that it doesn't matter. I suspect that some kids actually like the unnatural awkwardness of the title, perhaps subconsciously. It may feel foreign, exotic, new and unfamiliar, rebellious. I'm just talking about how titles sound to English-speakers who don't watch anime. Even Kill la Kill has a pretty weird title, but became massively popular.

Oh, and when I first heard "Attack on Titan," I thought it was a sci-fi show involving Saturn's moon Titan. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titan_(moon)
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Posted 1/15/18 , edited 1/16/18

nDroae wrote:

In the case of Attack on Titan, author Hajime Isayama is obviously a westaboo (I'm not saying that derogatively, I'm glad that's a thing) with his eurocentric setting, and apparently he was the one who wanted the English title to be Attack on Titan.


If that's the case, Hajime Isayama probably made a mistake when trying to find English words that mean the same or maybe he tried compromising between a direct translation and something that sounds cooler but ended up with this. "Shingeki no Kyojin" would make grammatical sense but the real meaning of it isn't revealed until very late in the manga. That meaning is lost in the English title. It's not that big of deal, but I can imagine a lot of people laughing and making jokes about it when the anime reaches that point.


Oh, and when I first heard "Attack on Titan," I thought it was a sci-fi show involving Saturn's moon Titan. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titan_(moon)


lol I thought the same thing too when I first heard the title.
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Posted 1/15/18 , edited 1/15/18

nDroae wrote:



I don't have a problem with "titan," because it sounds awesome; but actually, shingeki doesn't mean "attack" in Japanese:
https://anime.stackexchange.com/questions/11370/why-is-shingeki-no-kyojin-translated-as-attack-on-titan



the first post in that thread said "From Google translate "Shingeki means advance"

Yet, when I type it into google translate the English word returned is "attack"

then someone later explains it basically means a quick military advance.

I guess it's all semantics because some words don't have direct translations, but the closest substitutes have to be used. I'd say "attack" or "charge" could both be used in this case.



I don't think either was originally meant for English speakers; English is hip in Japan. An American equivalent "cool foreign title" is Daikatana


I think as soon as John Romero claimed he was going to make everyone his bitch, that term became lame instead of cool
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Posted 1/15/18 , edited 1/16/18
How about these:
  • Bobobo-bo Bo-bobo
  • Sumomo mo Momo mo
  • Super Robot Wars: Original Generation: Divine Wars

And if we're also including video game titles, then:
  • Melty Blood Actress Again Current Code
  • Under Night In-Birth Exe:Late[st]
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Posted 1/15/18 , edited 1/16/18
Fate/kaleid liner PRISMA☆ILLYA

This one was always perplexing to me. The Fate series has always been full of weird names (Fate/Stay Night: Unlimited Blade Works).
However, this title always got me thinking "What the hell does any of this mean". And after watching the show myself I'd like to say, there were better naming options out there to convey what the show is about.
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Posted 1/15/18 , edited 1/16/18

KoalaKing51 wrote:

Fate/kaleid liner PRISMA☆ILLYA

This one was always perplexing to me. The Fate series has always been full of weird names (Fate/Stay Night: Unlimited Blade Works).
However, this title always got me thinking "What the hell does any of this mean". And after watching the show myself I'd like to say, there were better naming options out there to convey what the show is about.


I think it's meant to be satire on nonsense terms in magical girl shows
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Posted 1/16/18 , edited 1/16/18

nDroae wrote:

Attack on Titan is a bad title. Most likely, when you first heard it, either you thought it was bad (and perhaps since forgot); or you were already so used to Engrish that you accepted it without much thought.



I thought it was about an interplanetary war on Titan, one of the moons of Saturn.

nDroae 
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Posted 1/16/18 , edited 1/16/18
@BettyColtrane That was my first thought too.
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Posted 1/16/18 , edited 1/16/18

HOOfan_1 wrote:

Considering the titans are attacking, the name is grammatically incorrect.


Except the main characters join a group whose primary goal is basically leading a counterattack against the Titans, so I'd say that part of the grammar still stands.


In the same vein as SnK/AoT, another translation I've always had issue with was for Akuma no Riddle, which was translated as Riddle Story of Devil. It too lacks a necessary article, and ends up being awkward-sounding. I also have no idea what a "riddle story" is, or how the English word 'riddle' translates to that.
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Posted 1/16/18 , edited 1/16/18

Lord_Wunder wrote:


HOOfan_1 wrote:

Considering the titans are attacking, the name is grammatically incorrect.


Except the main characters join a group whose primary goal is basically leading a counterattack against the Titans, so I'd say that part of the grammar still stands.


In the same vein as SnK/AoT, another translation I've always had issue with was for Akuma no Riddle, which was translated as Riddle Story of Devil. It too lacks a necessary article, and ends up being awkward-sounding. I also have no idea what a "riddle story" is, or how the English word 'riddle' translates to that.


yeah, but it should still be Attack on the Titans
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