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Worst/Dumbest anime names?
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Posted 1/16/18 , edited 1/16/18

Gafennec wrote:


rcsatcrunchyroll wrote:
titles that certain fans insist must be kept in untranslated Japanese when English localizations are available (e.g. Shingeki no Kyoujin versus Attack On Titan).


Oh God; please don't get me started on that. It's a major pet peeve of mine. I find it annoying, at best, or weaboism/snobbery at worse. This is an English language board....please use the English titles if there is one. But I have to honestly admit that I use San-Gatsu no Lion rather then the longer English title since I got arthritic fingers and it is easier to type. Yeah, I'm a hypocrite. :D
I'll use the English title if it isn't something completely missing the point, loses something huge in translation or isn't otherwise botched.

For instance "Higurashi no naku koro ni" and "Umineko no naku koro ni" are generally titled "Higurashi: When they Cry", and "Umineko: When they Cry", or sometimes just "When they Cry" in the west, probably because the VN used "When they Cry" in English for the series title screens in order to sound cool in Japanese. This crap is about as cringe worthy as the "Lets FIghting Love" Southpark episode only unintentional.

So I will always either just say Higurashi/Umineko(since people recognize that), use the full Japanese title, or used perfectly understandable actual English translations that would have made sense when used: "When the Cicadas Cry/ When the Seagulls Cry". The English titles don't convey the fact that they are talking about animal calls and not crying tears, which is obnoxious because they both represent something important in the stories.

I'm totally cool with using English titles when appropriate, but I tend to avoid using ones that are cringeworthy as hell because they were decided by someone with a limited knowledge of one of the languages.
Dewxy 
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Posted 1/16/18 , edited 1/16/18
So Ra No Wo To - It apparently translates to "Sound of the Sky" which is strange to me as I don't know what that sound would be ._.
The way it is is presented is also a bit strange: https://myanimelist.net/anime/6802/So_Ra_No_Wo_To

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Posted 1/16/18 , edited 1/16/18
Oh, goodness. There's so many I've lost count.

Akiba's Trip The Animation was very bad in my opinion. Some of the animation in it was so lazy I felt that 2 year olds must have been doing the artwork for some of the scenes. Also half the characters were obese, including some of the main female characters.

But going back, there's so many dumb anime out there ... whether they have a good anime name title or not ... that I've honestly lost count.
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Posted 1/16/18 , edited 1/17/18

Dewxy wrote:

So Ra No Wo To - It apparently translates to "Sound of the Sky" which is strange to me as I don't know what that sound would be ._.
The way it is is presented is also a bit strange: https://myanimelist.net/anime/6802/So_Ra_No_Wo_To



Sora no oto would be as a phrase. Using "wo" is clearer to a Japanese reader that it's starting a word rather than a possessive particle, I'm not great with literature but that type of use happens sometimes, more in older works *I think.*


Grammar of "Attack on Titan":
1. Titles only need the Rule of Cool. Conciseness is a plus, if not aiming for "over-long" titles.

2. To a Japanese audience, the English "Attack on Titan" does make grammatical sense. Japanese lacks parts of speech specifying "the" or an 'apostrophe s' shorthand to mean the plural of a word.

What's being talked about comes from any particles and (optional) counters included, plus context. Japanese for "Titan" kyoujin (giant) is both singular and plural at the same time, unless more information is provided in the sentence or by context.

However, "Shingeki no kyoujin" is a grammatically awkward, unclear phrase even in Japanese. It makes as much sense natively as "Attack on Titan" makes sense to native English speakers -- kind-of-sort-of, with room for interpretation. But it has impact.

3. When a subtitle exists in the original Japanese version, it's for the Japanese audience. 90% for coolness and marketing, and 10% to add layers of meanings. Frequently subtitles are intended to change the original meaning, or expand how you can interpret the title.

Think of titles like "Training Day", "Gone With the Wind", etc. with layers of meaning. "Oliver Twist" -- it's a character's name, but there are lots of "twists" in the story.

4. AoT/Shingeki no kyoujin both titles take on layers of meaning as the series goes on. Whether it was planned from the beginning I can't say. But even from the beginning: Titans attack the humans. The humans then train up to attack the Titans. It works both ways of "attack on the titans" and "attack of the titans."
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