Post Reply Can an elective monarchy also be a constitutional monarchy?
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Posted 1/27/18 , edited 1/27/18
I really need an answer and trying to search online is a bit challenging. I want to know can an elective monarchy also be a constitutional monarchy?

Aren't they normally like that anyway or can an elective monarchy be an absolute monarchy? In an elective monarchy, how long does the elected monarch hold his or her position for?


I don't know! What do you think?
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Posted 1/27/18 , edited 1/27/18

qualeshia3 wrote:

I really need an answer and trying to search online is a bit challenging. I want to know can an elective monarchy also be a constitutional monarchy?

Aren't they normally like that anyway or can an elective monarchy be an absolute monarchy? In an elective monarchy, how long does the elected monarch hold his or her position for?


I don't know! What do you think?


the first part I would have to say yes it would pretty much have to be

second I am going to say no that is more of a Hereditary monarchy

But a Hereditary monarchy can also be a constitutional monarchy ie the queen of England and the emperor of Japan

the only absolute monarchy of any real power I would say in the King of saudi arabia
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Posted 1/27/18 , edited 1/28/18

uncletim wrote:


qualeshia3 wrote:

I really need an answer and trying to search online is a bit challenging. I want to know can an elective monarchy also be a constitutional monarchy?

Aren't they normally like that anyway or can an elective monarchy be an absolute monarchy? In an elective monarchy, how long does the elected monarch hold his or her position for?


I don't know! What do you think?


the first part I would have to say yes it would pretty much have to be

second I am going to say no that is more of a Hereditary monarchy

But a Hereditary monarchy can also be a constitutional monarchy ie the queen of England and the Empire of Japan

the only absolute monarchy of any real power I would say in the King of saudi arabia



So, elective monarchy can be constitutional? It makes sense that they could be.

qwueri 
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Posted 1/27/18 , edited 1/28/18
Being lazy and referencing the examples given on Wikipedia I say that yes, an elective monarchy can derive it's power from a constitution. Though in practice, it seems like a significant number of elective monarchies used military force when the successor was not a living family member of the previous monarch.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elective_monarchy
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absolute_monarchy
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Posted 1/27/18 , edited 1/28/18

A monarchy can have a constitution. It can also kinda sorta have a parliament or congress. Look up the UK government's history. There was sort of a long transition from your typical monarchy to what the government is today. (the monarchy being somewhat more of a figurehead and celebrity rather than an actual governing "body", though the queen does have the ability to influence and guide, but for the most part, has no real power).

It's one of the few surviving "monarchies" of sorts, and as far as I can recall, most other countries that switched to democratic rule did so through civil war...

I have no idea what you are looking for but that's probably going to get you to where you want to go.

as for electing a monarch, which is what I'm guessing you're alluding to... sure.. why not? Although it sounds more like a president for life.
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Posted 1/27/18 , edited 1/27/18
The United Arab Emirates is an interesting example. It is a federation of absolute monarchies who elect one of their hereditary monarchs (emirs) to be President and another to be Prime Minister. In theory any Emir could be appointed to either post but the 3 presidents and 3 prime ministers so far have come from the same two families.

I expect that there are agreements between the Emirs on how the UAE functions but I doubt you could go as far as calling it constitutional. They have made token gestures at democracy but elected officials hold no power and act only in a consultative capacity.
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Posted 1/27/18 , edited 1/28/18

serifsansserif wrote:


A monarchy can have a constitution. It can also kinda sorta have a parliament or congress. Look up the UK government's history. There was sort of a long transition from your typical monarchy to what the government is today. (the monarchy being somewhat more of a figurehead and celebrity rather than an actual governing "body", though the queen does have the ability to influence and guide, but for the most part, has no real power).

It's one of the few surviving "monarchies" of sorts, and as far as I can recall, most other countries that switched to democratic rule did so through civil war...

I have no idea what you are looking for but that's probably going to get you to where you want to go.

as for electing a monarch, which is what I'm guessing you're alluding to... sure.. why not? Although it sounds more like a president for life.


Thanks


What I'm trying to figure out is if a country can be both an elective monarchy and constitutional monarchy?

Like a few people elect a monarch but the monarch follows a constitution and doesn't create law or regulations.

Pretty much a monarch is elected but the country is a constitutional nation.


I would have explained it better but I coming up a little empty on what to say.
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Posted 1/28/18 , edited 1/28/18

qualeshia3 wrote:

What I'm trying to figure out is if a country can be both an elective monarchy and constitutional monarchy?

Like a few people elect a monarch but the monarch follows a constitution and doesn't create law or regulations.

Pretty much a monarch is elected but the country is a constitutional nation.


I would have explained it better but I coming up a little empty on what to say.


It sounds like Malaysia is the perfect example of what you are looking for.

From Wikipedia:


Malaysia is a federal constitutional elective monarchy, and the only federation in Southeast Asia. The system of government is closely modelled on that of the Westminster parliamentary system, a legacy of British colonial rule. The head of state is the Yang di-Pertuan Agong, commonly referred to as the King. The King is elected to a five-year term by and from among the nine hereditary rulers of the Malay states; the other four states, which have titular Governors, do not participate in the selection. By informal agreement the position is systematically rotated among the nine, and has been held by Muhammad V of Kelantan since December 2016. The King's role has been largely ceremonial since changes to the constitution in 1994, picking ministers and members of the upper house.

Legislative power is divided between federal and state legislatures.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malaysia#Government_and_politics
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Posted 1/28/18 , edited 1/29/18

MidoriNoTora wrote:

It sounds like Malaysia is the perfect example of what you are looking for.

From Wikipedia:


Malaysia is a federal constitutional elective monarchy, and the only federation in Southeast Asia. The system of government is closely modelled on that of the Westminster parliamentary system, a legacy of British colonial rule. The head of state is the Yang di-Pertuan Agong, commonly referred to as the King. The King is elected to a five-year term by and from among the nine hereditary rulers of the Malay states; the other four states, which have titular Governors, do not participate in the selection. By informal agreement the position is systematically rotated among the nine, and has been held by Muhammad V of Kelantan since December 2016. The King's role has been largely ceremonial since changes to the constitution in 1994, picking ministers and members of the upper house.

Legislative power is divided between federal and state legislatures.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malaysia#Government_and_politics



Thanks.
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Posted 2/3/18 , edited 2/3/18
Thanks for the comments, cool people.
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