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Post Reply Cleaning chemicals found to reduce lung function
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Posted 2/16/18 , edited 2/16/18
http://www.bbc.com/news/health-43085674

A study of 6000 people at a Norway university found that women had reduced lung function after years of cleaning. Men appeared to have no significant loss between those who cleaned and those who didn't.
They conclude that water is enough, and cleaning chemicals are unnecessary.

This comes to no surprise to me, as I've always pretty much found cleaning chemicals to smell and taste bad, and cause strong sensations of pain especially in my lungs.
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Posted 2/16/18 , edited 2/16/18
"Cleaning chemicals are unnecessary."

For a guy that has been working at a fast food restaurant for the past 10 months whose main job is to clean, I call bullshit. Sure, the "restroom cleaner" we could probably do without and just use sanitizer water instead, but if you try to clean windows or the hood to a broiler with water it will get you absolutely nowhere. Same could be said for the outside and inner-cabinet to the frypots. You aren't gonna loosen grease buildup with water. You need a degreaser.
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Posted 2/16/18 , edited 2/16/18
Having cleaned industrial restaurant equipment, yeah. You're not getting that miracle muck off without some major lipid break-up. It's not just aerated grease, but soot.
Having cleaned fryers... You can only get so far before you need to chemically clean them. Then you have to make sure every particle of the chemicals are removed.

For home use, though? They're probably right, mostly. It's so much easier to "clean" home-use appliances.
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Posted 2/16/18 , edited 2/16/18
Water won't disinfect.you need to use a bleach water solution if you want to keep infections like flu and staph at bay.
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Posted 2/16/18 , edited 2/16/18
Reduces lung fuction? Bad for us? Yeah, the warning labels on those things are more than hint enough.

I beg differ on the "water is enough" bit, however. Alone, you can only hope to get a superficial cleaning, if you manage to even make it do a decent job at all. I commonly do a water pre-clean before I bust out more serious cleaners, from vinegar + water + baking soda, to Ajax. Trying to pass off plain water as a regular cleaner isn't very practical at all. The link actually says that water and a microfiber cloth is usually enough, but even that is stretching it. If you want to get much of anything out of water, you're going to have to nab a specialized steam cleaner.
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Posted 2/16/18 , edited 2/16/18
"Cleaning chemicals" is a pretty broad category and I'm not sure how well this advice translates to home cleaning. Industrial cleaning you can be exposed to quite a few harsh chemicals ( hence most cleaners wearing masks these days ). Depending on what your cleaning and what your company wants you to use for it.

But typical household cleaners aren't like that. Especially these days when household cleaners have been trending towards being milder / using less chemicals for years. So unless you're the sort that needs to bleach every square inch of your house or something the article's advice is kind of useless without specifics on what exactly to avoid in home products.


Posted 2/16/18 , edited 2/16/18
I secretly use the washing powder anyway
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Posted 2/16/18 , edited 2/16/18
As someone who's sensitive to the fumes I can certainly see how some could affect lung function from prolonged exposure. Bleach-based stuff in particular is nasty in an enclosed space. I don't buy the "water is enough" for cleaning certain surfaces, stains, and residues. Water on a greasy surface? Good luck. But yeah, definitely good to make sure a bathroom or kitchen is aired out during and after cleaning.
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Posted 2/16/18 , edited 2/16/18
http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwjn4uWyravZAhVSyWMKHa0pBOwQFggmMAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.thoracic.org%2Fabout%2Fnewsroom%2Fpress-releases%2Fresources%2Fwomen-cleaners-lung-function.pdf&usg=AOvVaw1xbfDMEPOgxZXgTRk1DlD2
Link to the study PDF.


Main results As compared to women not engaged in cleaning (∆FEV1=-18.5 ml/year), FEV1 14 declined more rapidly in women responsible for cleaning at home (-22.1, p=0.01) and 15 occupational cleaners (-22.4, p=0.03). The same was found for decline in FVC (∆FVC-=8.8 16 ml/year; -13.1, p=0.02 and -15.9, p=0.002, respectively). Both cleaning sprays and other 17 cleaning agents were associated with accelerated FEV1 decline (-22.0, p=0.04 and -22.9, 18 p=0.004, respectively). Cleaning was not significantly associated with lung function decline in 19 men, or with FEV1/FVC-decline or airway obstruction.



Among 3,298 female participants, the majority reported to be the person cleaning at home 118 (85.1%), as compared to 46.5% of 2932 male participants (table 3). There were 293 (8.9%) 119 women and 57 (1.9%) men that reported working with occupational cleaning. Persons 120 cleaning at home were more often never-smokers and had smoked less pack-years than the 121 other two exposure groups. The occupational cleaners had a lower age at attained education 122 compared to others, independent of sex. Women cleaning at home and female occupational 123 cleaners had more doctor diagnosed asthma than women not cleaning. Further, men 124 cleaning at home had more doctor diagnosed asthma as compared to men not cleaning and 125 male occupational cleaners. There was not substantially higher prevalence of spirometric 126 defined chronic airway obstruction in either of the exposure groups as compared to the 127 unexposed group (table 3).



Women not working as cleaners and not involved in cleaning at home showed the lowest 129 decline in FEV1 and FVC (table 4). Female occupational cleaners, including those who in 130 addition also cleaned at home, had the highest mean decline in FEV1 and FVC. The 131 differences between each of the two exposed groups and the reference group were 132 statistically significant (table 4). In relation to exposure, the increase in decline was similar 133 for FEV1 and FVC, and therefore no apparent difference in the decline of the FEV1/FVC ratio 134 was seen. The average annual decline was 0.5% in all three exposure groups. Male 135 occupational cleaners and men cleaning at home did not have accelerated lung function 136 decline as compared to men who reported no cleaning activities between ECRHS I and 137 ECRHS II (table E1 in the online data supplement). 138 Among women, the use of sprays or other cleaning products (i.e. non-sprays) at least one 139 once per week was associated with accelerated decline in FEV1 as compared to not 140 performing cleaning activities (table 4). Use of other cleaning products at least once per 141 week was also associated with accelerated decline in FVC (table 4). Among male cleaners, 142
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine Copyright © 2018 American Thoracic Society
8
not either sprays or other cleaning products were significantly associated with lung function 143 decline (table E1 in the online data supplement).


Most cleaning agents have an irritative effect on the mucous membranes of the airways [22] 183 [9]. One possible mechanism for the accelerated decline in cleaners is the repetitive 184 exposure to low-grade irritative cleaning agents over time, thereby causing persistent 185 changes in the airways. Also, some cleaning agents may have sensitizing properties through 186 specific immunological mechanism; quaternary ammonium compounds are known to have 187 sensitizing effects in the airways, as well as also having an irritative effect [22]. Repeated 188 exposure could lead to remodelling of the airways, thereby over time causing an accelerated 189 decline in FVC and FEV1. Also, one could hypothesize that long-term exposure to airway 190 irritants such as ammonia and bleach used when cleaning at home could cause fibrotic or 191 other interstitial changes in the lung tissue, thereby leading to accelerated decline of FVC 192 [23].

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Posted 2/16/18 , edited 2/16/18
the idea that one wants to "de-germ" with just water alone regarding cleaning something, I find that frightful and the idea to even remotely want to dine at said location terrifies me. I've been using cleaning chemicals all my life and I have had no effects from them. I've used some pretty harsh ones, mild ones and so forth. but there again I'm not ingesting said chemicals such as TBHQ, BHT and BHA, so maybe that's why I'm good to go. regardless, the true horrors of using cleaning chemicals, if idiots don't know how to change a light bulb, it terrifies me the idea of people cleaning with bleach and ammonia. goodness, if people eat tide pods... but this is the UK results after all, their studies are a bit too meh for my "taste"
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Posted 2/16/18 , edited 2/17/18




i avoid whenever possible. Isoproply alcohol and vinegar is usually more than enough to cleanse everything plus some soap.
Vahvi 
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Posted 2/16/18 , edited 2/16/18

gornotck wrote:

Having cleaned industrial restaurant equipment, yeah. You're not getting that miracle muck off without some major lipid break-up. It's not just aerated grease, but soot.
Having cleaned fryers... You can only get so far before you need to chemically clean them. Then you have to make sure every particle of the chemicals are removed.

For home use, though? They're probably right, mostly. It's so much easier to "clean" home-use appliances.


Oh god, fryers. I've serviced a few in my day and you ain't gettin em clean without some degreaser. They are by far the nastiest things you will ever find in a commercial setting.
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Posted 2/16/18 , edited 2/17/18
Meh, I smoke weed so my lungs are stronge
Posted 2/17/18 , edited 2/18/18
Huffing shit..smh


It should be common sense when using any chemicals to have plenty of ventilation.
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Posted 2/18/18 , edited 2/19/18
is it bad to sniff germ-x
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