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Post Reply Worst parts of the 90's/early 2000's anime boom
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24 / M / Finland
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Posted 2/19/18 , edited 2/19/18
Although i started watching anime back in 2013, i'm going to say piratism and fan subs. That's what i read about back then.
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27 / M / Houston, Texas
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Posted 2/19/18 , edited 2/19/18
VHS, dial up, lack of accessibility and blind buying. Yeah I don't miss any of this.
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36 / M / SoFlo
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Posted 2/19/18 , edited 2/19/18
OP you pretty much got everything I could think of.

VHS tapes being $20 - $30 a pop with only 2 or 3 episodes was the worst. And now all those VHS tapes I spent a ton of money on are worthless. I ended up tossing them out last year.
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25 / M / The Netherlands
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Posted 2/19/18 , edited 2/19/18
- Watching anime on YouTube with every episode split into 3 parts.
- Watching anime on Google Video when an episode wasn't on YouTube.
- Visiting pirate sites with terrible videostreams in general.
- Writing down which episode of a long shounen series you stopped watching at in case you forgot.
- Not being able to watch full-screen on some video sharing sites.
- The quality of video streams.
- Having to pirate everything because stores just weren't selling anything around here.

I've only been watching anime since 2005 or so, so these are more early/mid 2000's problems though.
I'm so glad Crunchyroll and Netflix exist to make watching anime a better experience, even if the offer is extremely limited in my country.
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27 / M / Dallas
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Posted 2/19/18 , edited 2/20/18
Back in 2003 my family cut the cable. To get my anime fix a friend would record Toonami and Adult Swim shows for me. I also picked up dvds of Yu Yu Hakusho and Inuyasha. The single volumes had 3 to 4 episodes going for $20. I don't miss those days at all.
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17 / M / California
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Posted 2/19/18 , edited 2/20/18
I wasnt alive back then
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Posted 2/19/18 , edited 2/19/18
I remember watching my first anime in the early 90s (maybe even late 80s?), I have no idea what it was called but it was extremely gruesome. People were transforming into demons and ripping people apart. I watched it at my uncle's house who was a big computer nerd. (He had a rotary phone looking thing for a modem and it was top of the line shit lol) I dont remember any anime being accessible to me personally besides that one I saw. (I was still a kid tho and wouldnt have known where to look anyway) Now I can watch pretty much anything on a whim. I love it.


Lol, back when Garbage Pail Kids were cool and Cell phones had to be carried in large cases the size of a shoe box.
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M / Oregon
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Posted 2/20/18 , edited 2/20/18

TenzenShadow wrote:

I remember watching my first anime in the early 90s (maybe even late 80s?), I have no idea what it was called but it was extremely gruesome. People were transforming into demons and ripping people apart.
Probably the original Devilman that was made back in the '70s. It was pretty brutal for its time, and Crybaby's just continuing that legacy.


official-shinsengumi wrote:

Fan service and eyes...
Oof, I'm starting the original Clannad visual novel right now, and reminders of anime eyes from that time are constantly plaguing me currently. People complain, but anime art has made some truly great strides in improvement over the years.

Fanservice, though? It's 2018 and one of the biggest titles of the season is practically built on fanservice. That's never changing, but if fanservice ends up being this industry's biggest problem, there are certainly worse realities we could live in.
Ejanss 
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Posted 2/20/18 , edited 2/20/18

Commander_PonyShep wrote:

In my case, it's the following:

1. VHS's and DVD's being rare, expensive, and containing only a few episodes of a series in each disk.

2. Only a few different blocks were willing to air anime, e.g. the Fox and CW 4Kids blocks, Jetix, Toonami, etc., and even then never really aired that many good or faithful dubs.

3. Self-entitled anime fans who put down newcomers to anime for not being as into the medium as they were at the time.

4. Pirating, because it all predated subscription-based streaming services like Crunchyroll, Netflix, and Hulu.

Which parts of the 90's/2000's anime boom did you consider the worst parts, and why?


This sounds a lot like next-generation "Boy, life musta sucked for you Old People back then without the Internet, huh?" Millennialism that's finally penetrated the anime fandom, when you try to persuade a 10's fan to watch a historic anime show that's actually (gasp!) NOT streaming!
No one else would ever use a term like "90's-00's anime boom" as if it was one thing.

Since you asked, one of the good things about 90's-00's anime was that no one in Japan back then was out hunting down hikkikomori NEETs and trying to punish them for "causing" the Recession and low-birthrates, and anime was still something that could be respectably shown on television after school.
As such, anime shows were still mainstream, and had mainstream entertainment, without fears that it would cause pedophilia or unemployment, and that it would marginalize itself too much if it catered to "fetish niches".


neugenx wrote:
[While I fully agree with you on points 1-3 being major problems point 4 was more a non-issue in the early days of anime. Back in those days many creators happily told fan-subbers/clubs to sub their works that would never arrive on non-Asian shores. If there were no licensing deals in place they had no problem. It was only after deals were offered that they retracted their support. Now we're looking at a whole new market where licensing deals are a daily thing/commonplace and unlike the old days piracy means a major loss of revenue.


There was basically a "Gray-market" in place, just as the Internet was coming in--
With most companies only able to license OVA's and features in the 90's, tape-trading fansubbed VHS's of established TV series became an industry, until BitTorrent came along, and then fansubs went digital. But this was opposed to pirating: Pirates wanted the paranoid bragging rights of downloading anything they could buy for free because they could, while the majority of anime downloaders were "gray-market" fans who just wanted to sample the show for themselves, and destroyed the file once the commercial release came out on nice, clean, professional DVD.
As we assumed was someday going to happen to Sgt. Frog or Oh Edo Rocket, industry willing.


What I think was more an issue back in the 90s/00s was a lack of licensing deals for many mainstream and well-known titles. Up until a few months ago and the debut of Hi-dive OVAs and Movies were lost in a huge hole in the anime market except sometimes by being included in full season sets. Now both Hi-dive and CR are going out of their way to give us OVAs to the shows they carry and one-shot movies that would have been a sin to never have seen in the best quality possible.


Actually, what nearly killed anime in the 00's--The Bubble, as us vets called it, and it was--were too many licensing deals:
Once Japanese licensors finally caught on that they had fans across the pond, they tried to push every single current TV ratings hit onto ADV and Pioneer for the prices they could get, and US companies bought them hoping to "make" hits out of them, whether the fans had heard of "Peach Girl" or "Coyote Ragtime Show" or not. It was easier than getting the classics, once the prices had gone up, and hey, who's to say what won't be the next "classic"?
They had to, because there was no Crunchyroll back then to do next-day simulcast, and weed out the US hits from the flops before they'd even been disk-licensed. (If you were a major-company exec, would you have licensed Kemono Friends or Mr. Osomatsu for a major hoped disk/broadcast deal??)

Also, the Boxset hadn't come along yet, but fans were just starting to catch on that if ADV released six 4-episode DVD's over six months, the double-dipped Complete Boxset would be available a few months after that, so why not save a few bucks and wait?
That left a lot of the retailers who'd hoped to get in on the "anime trend" stuck with a lot of $30 mid-volume disks that weren't selling to fans and weren't selling to mainstream regular folk either. And when Best Buy, who'd first hoped to start a whole anime section of their video shelf, found themselves buried in disks of Princess Nine and Princess Tutu, and finally thumbed their nose at ADV's "Disks with 'Princess' in the title", most of mainstream retail went with it.

Yes, Crunchyroll has solved a lot of the problems that could have prevented the Bubble, but it still has its own problems to deal with at the moment. Like...most of the series that do get made, nowadays.
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18 / M / Texas
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Posted 2/20/18 , edited 2/20/18
Seeing the same freakin selections at Blockbuster. IVE SEEN ALL THESE MAN!
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Posted 2/20/18 , edited 2/20/18

AlexSenko wrote:


TenzenShadow wrote:

I remember watching my first anime in the early 90s (maybe even late 80s?), I have no idea what it was called but it was extremely gruesome. People were transforming into demons and ripping people apart.
Probably the original Devilman that was made back in the '70s. It was pretty brutal for its time, and Crybaby's just continuing that legacy.


official-shinsengumi wrote:

Fan service and eyes...
Oof, I'm starting the original Clannad visual novel right now, and reminders of anime eyes from that time are constantly plaguing me currently. People complain, but anime art has made some truly great strides in improvement over the years.

Fanservice, though? It's 2018 and one of the biggest titles of the season is practically built on fanservice. That's never changing, but if fanservice ends up being this industry's biggest problem, there are certainly worse realities we could live in.


Hmmm, maybe. I have seen crybaby tho, and it didnt ring any bells. I might have to look into that. Any ideas where to find the original?
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19 / M / Time
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Posted 2/20/18 , edited 2/20/18
Back in my day I had to search and download anime. Now it's instantly avaiblable.
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M / Oregon
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Posted 2/20/18 , edited 2/20/18

TenzenShadow wrote:

Hmmm, maybe. I have seen crybaby tho, and it didnt ring any bells. I might have to look into that. Any ideas where to find the original?
Tried looking for somewhere (legal) to stream it and didn't come up with anything. If you're curious though, try some searches for Devilman 1972. It's a very different show than Crybaby, so it wouldn't be surprising if you weren't reminded of it. Once you've gotten a look at it, though, I'll be interested in hearing if that was indeed what you saw or not. Another possibility might've been Wicked City (careful, this is a pretty graphic one).
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29 / M / St.Louis
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Posted 2/20/18 , edited 2/20/18

Ejanss wrote:
Since you asked, one of the good things about 90's-00's anime was that no one in Japan back then was out hunting down hikkikomori NEETs and trying to punish them for "causing" the Recession and low-birthrates, and anime was still something that could be respectably shown on television after school.
As such, anime shows were still mainstream, and had mainstream entertainment, without fears that it would cause pedophilia or unemployment, and that it would marginalize itself too much if it catered to "fetish niches".
I'm guessing you never watched shows like Sister Princess and the like back in the day.
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40 / M / Charlotte, NC
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Posted 2/22/18 , edited 2/23/18
Something simple you've not mentioned: the only place to really interact with the community was by writing letters to ANIMERICA magazine....
Pretty much the only active anime forum I knew about until the end of the 90s...
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