Post Reply A term for a type of skirt often used by magical girls?
2392 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Offline
Posted 3/3/18 , edited 3/4/18
This is a slightly awkward question, but I'm just curious if there's a name for a particular type of skirt (or article of clothing) common to magical girls.

The item in question is a sort of bed of frills that the legs poke through rather than simply having the skirt drape downwards. It seems to be almost exclusively used on shorter skirts.

I find it interesting as a novel way to prevent upskirt fiascoes in magical girl shows where otherwise the dynamic and acrobatic combat might make that a problem.

I first noticed Cure Peach wearing this type of skirt in Fresh! PreCure and it has been a reoccurring design for some cures.

A more well-known wearer of this type of skirt would be Madoka Kaname from Puella Magi Madoka Magica.

I hope people know what I'm talking about, as I'd rather not go hunting for pictures (for obvious reason). I find this design of skirt especially elegant and cute, and so wanted to know if there is a term for it or if it is a completely fictional construct.

Thanks in advance!
17320 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
37 / M / UK
Offline
Posted 3/4/18 , edited 3/4/18
There could be other names for them but the traditional English term is petticoats.

They have been around for centuries in various guises, with the shape and size adjusting to the current fashion of the over-skirt.
Guest Pass Litter Moderator
121166 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
F / Boston-ish
Offline
Posted 3/4/18 , edited 3/4/18

Cait_Sidhe wrote:

This is a slightly awkward question, but I'm just curious if there's a name for a particular type of skirt (or article of clothing) common to magical girls.

The item in question is a sort of bed of frills that the legs poke through rather than simply having the skirt drape downwards. It seems to be almost exclusively used on shorter skirts.


I know that as a petticoat, but in real life it doesn't on its own prevent activity-based upskirt incidents (it does prevent skirt clinging to body problems). I used to square dance and this type of undergarment was common (though dresses and skirts weren't usually that short). For modesty, since dance moves do result in the skirt spinning up, it was traditional to also wear ruffled "pettipants."

10072 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Offline
Posted 3/4/18 , edited 3/4/18
I thought the term for those skirts that spread outwards instead of hanging like normal cloth was "Hoop Skirt" due to the wire hoops inside that made a stiff frame for the material to cover. You'd wear one or more petticoats to cover up your thighs and knickers (and keep your legs warm) which explains the multiple layers.

I am impressed at your attention to detail and deep thinking to come up with such an observation and question.
2392 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Offline
Posted 3/4/18 , edited 3/4/18
Much obliged for the responses, everyone. Each one of them was extremely helpful in me piecing together some understanding!


MidoriNoTora wrote:

There could be other names for them but the traditional English term is petticoats.

They have been around for centuries in various guises, with the shape and size adjusting to the current fashion of the over-skirt.


This does seem to be the type of underskirt I was referring to, so thank you! I had no idea what a petticoat was, even though I had heard the term before. I think my mind just kind of meshed it together with what little I knew about other "old-timey" women's wear like the crinoline.

I've always had a passing interest in that type of wear, but never the time to justify actually researching it. The deep history behind it is fascinating though.


lorreen wrote:

I know that as a petticoat, but in real life it doesn't on its own prevent activity-based upskirt incidents (it does prevent skirt clinging to body problems). I used to square dance and this type of undergarment was common (though dresses and skirts weren't usually that short). For modesty, since dance moves do result in the skirt spinning up, it was traditional to also wear ruffled "pettipants."



And thank you especially for the sort of "first-hand" clarifications. The anime versions seem to be a great deal more idealized than real life. Thanks to your post and the post below, I now believe that these skirts are supposed to represent a combination of many-layered petticoats and a pair of pettipants, but since anime is so idealized, it manifests as something kind of "fused together" into a single bed of frills. Although, I have seen some magical girls that I now realize are just wearing the pettipants you mentioned under a fairly normal skirt.

Well, I say "normal", but they are all extremely short, aren't they?


CasualObserver wrote:

I thought the term for those skirts that spread outwards instead of hanging like normal cloth was "Hoop Skirt" due to the wire hoops inside that made a stiff frame for the material to cover. You'd wear one or more petticoats to cover up your thighs and knickers (and keep your legs warm) which explains the multiple layers.


Yes, I think some magical girls are indeed wearing this hoop-skirt + petticoats design as well. Your post and the first post made me realize that the design I kind of grouped together as a "bed of frills" is actually different for each magical girl. This hoop skirt design seems common for magical girls with wider skirts of this type (or I assume that's the case, since I think you would need hoops to get that characteristic bell shape). And, like you mentioned, the petticoats seem to be filling out the frills.



Once again, thanks everyone. Not only did this answer my question, but it provided a new framework to examine this type of thing going forward.

Although, now I have new questions like "What's the difference between a hoop-skirt and a crinoline" and I need to do a bit more research on what exactly the petticoat is and how it looks at various historical points, but these are all questions I'm happy to come out with!
You must be logged in to post.