First  Prev  1  2  3  4  Next  Last
Post Reply Am I over a decade too late to the mecha party?
17452 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
38 / M / Oregon
Offline
Posted 3/28/18 , edited 3/29/18
Maybe people that feel Mecha is a passing fad have never played Super Robot Taisen.
1034 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
16 / M / East Coast-United...
Offline
Posted 3/28/18 , edited 3/28/18
I would not call Mecha a fad, but nobody can deny that Mecha is definitely on a decline. I doubt it will completely disappear, but it probably won't be as mainstream as it used to be.
1931 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
26 / M / bathtub
Offline
Posted 3/29/18 , edited 3/29/18
People are buying less mecha stuff which is to say less money is thrown at mecha and therefore it also receives less funding, is harder to get funding for.

The whole "this genre is going away because of current prevalent genre" is in some ways right and in some ways wrong. Yes, funding is only going to be given to a finite amount of projects, sure, but one project getting funding isn't necessarily mutual exclusive to another project getting funding. Maybe enitity A is willing to invest in one show and they have the option of mecha and a Moe show. They go for the moe show because they sell better and sell more merch. But that doesn't mean that same mecha show can't find funding elsewhere at the same time.

It would make more sense to blame moe or another genre for the decline in mecha, but I have to reject that premise since any one person could be a fan of both mecha, moe, and any other genre really.

Now if we want to get really silly and ask why, cuturally we see a shift away more and more from Mecha anime, maybe we could look at it this way. There is a positive correlation between the decline of the popularity of mecha anime and the length of time since which its country of origin was at war. The fact that mecha anime was created after the most recent war means that its rise also correlates with how long it has been since the country of origin was involved in a major war kind of mucks that up though. We could still say that having participated in a war, Japan created mecha anime, it reached a peak in popularity, and now, war being further and further from the subconscious of its culture of origin, the mecha genre, concerned primarily with war, is also on a decline.

Likewise, what would be most popular with a population at peace, and yet seemingly unwilling to get married and have children in as great a number as previous generations? Chilled out slice of life shows that portray life as calm and enjoyable sure match peace time. And shows packed to the brim with cute anime girls seems like something that would be even more guaranteed to sell in a population of people that aren't getting into committed relationships or reproducing as often as their parent generation.
20027 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
25 / M / missouri
Offline
Posted 3/29/18 , edited 3/29/18

aidenraine wrote:


auroraloose wrote:
Are giant robot suits still able to represent the intersection of technological and historical progress?

considering giant robots (not necessarily as they are represented in anime.... at least not yet) have moved to science fact instead of science fiction, I'd say yes. humanity doesn't have the technology to make smaller powered armor just yet, but there is exoskeleton and even mobility enhancing prototypes devices for the handicapped.


http://suidobashijuko.jp/
454 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
29 / M
Online
Posted 3/29/18 , edited 3/29/18

AsukaAyanami wrote:

People are buying less mecha stuff which is to say less money is thrown at mecha and therefore it also receives less funding, is harder to get funding for.

The whole "this genre is going away because of current prevalent genre" is in some ways right and in some ways wrong. Yes, funding is only going to be given to a finite amount of projects, sure, but one project getting funding isn't necessarily mutual exclusive to another project getting funding. Maybe enitity A is willing to invest in one show and they have the option of mecha and a Moe show. They go for the moe show because they sell better and sell more merch. But that doesn't mean that same mecha show can't find funding elsewhere at the same time.

It would make more sense to blame moe or another genre for the decline in mecha, but I have to reject that premise since any one person could be a fan of both mecha, moe, and any other genre really.

Now if we want to get really silly and ask why, cuturally we see a shift away more and more from Mecha anime, maybe we could look at it this way. There is a positive correlation between the decline of the popularity of mecha anime and the length of time since which its country of origin was at war. The fact that mecha anime was created after the most recent war means that its rise also correlates with how long it has been since the country of origin was involved in a major war kind of mucks that up though. We could still say that having participated in a war, Japan created mecha anime, it reached a peak in popularity, and now, war being further and further from the subconscious of its culture of origin, the mecha genre, concerned primarily with war, is also on a decline.

Likewise, what would be most popular with a population at peace, and yet seemingly unwilling to get married and have children in as great a number as previous generations? Chilled out slice of life shows that portray life as calm and enjoyable sure match peace time. And shows packed to the brim with cute anime girls seems like something that would be even more guaranteed to sell in a population of people that aren't getting into committed relationships or reproducing as often as their parent generation.


Hearing this almost makes me think about how military first/third-person shooter games managed to spread practically everywhere in America, ever since the 7th generation of consoles with games like Gears of War, Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare, Battlefield: Bad Company, and so on. Plus, shooters were what got me back into mecha anime, as well, due to both shooters and mecha involving modern day/sci-fi warfare.

So based on the rise of online multiplayer shooters and the decline of mecha, why is the West more willing to embrace its own war culture, while Japan would rather do the opposite with moe girls and slice-of-life?
7415 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
35 / Pacific North West
Online
Posted 3/29/18 , edited 3/29/18
As a fan of most genre's I personally disagree with using code geass as a pinnacle of Mecha anime. Strictly speaking the mechs in the show were more of a side plot then a main focus. Guren Lagann... well thats a classic. I would say gundam series is the pinnacle of Mecha Anime. Want proof? Go to a convention and see if more Gundam Gunpla or Geass gunpla is selling. Mecha is an evolving genre. We no longer have the dark and political mecha anime focusing on plot and the drama of it all. Now for the most part we get genre spinoffs such as Frame Arm Girls, Knights and Magic, ect. To an extent we could almost label Arpeggio of Blue Steel as a mecha(since the ships transformed). Either way its never too late to be interested in the Genre, you simply have to have more diverse taste to enjoy them.
1182 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
26 / M
Offline
Posted 3/29/18 , edited 3/29/18

Commander_PonyShep wrote:


AsukaAyanami wrote:

Now if we want to get really silly and ask why, cuturally we see a shift away more and more from Mecha anime, maybe we could look at it this way. There is a positive correlation between the decline of the popularity of mecha anime and the length of time since which its country of origin was at war. The fact that mecha anime was created after the most recent war means that its rise also correlates with how long it has been since the country of origin was involved in a major war kind of mucks that up though. We could still say that having participated in a war, Japan created mecha anime, it reached a peak in popularity, and now, war being further and further from the subconscious of its culture of origin, the mecha genre, concerned primarily with war, is also on a decline.

Likewise, what would be most popular with a population at peace, and yet seemingly unwilling to get married and have children in as great a number as previous generations? Chilled out slice of life shows that portray life as calm and enjoyable sure match peace time. And shows packed to the brim with cute anime girls seems like something that would be even more guaranteed to sell in a population of people that aren't getting into committed relationships or reproducing as often as their parent generation.


Hearing this almost makes me think about how military first/third-person shooter games managed to spread practically everywhere in America, ever since the 7th generation of consoles with games like Gears of War, Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare, Battlefield: Bad Company, and so on. Plus, shooters were what got me back into mecha anime, as well, due to both shooters and mecha involving modern day/sci-fi warfare.

So based on the rise of online multiplayer shooters and the decline of mecha, why is the West more willing to embrace its own war culture, while Japan would rather do the opposite with moe girls and slice-of-life?


Well, America has been at war to some degree for about 15 years straight now, and has been involved in a lot wars in the last 50 years. Japan's constitution has, since the end of WWII, basically allowed their military to be used for purely self-defense. I'm not trying to turn this thread into a political discussion, but if you want to explain a decline in mecha anime while shooter games are very successful in America, I would look at that basic fact.

BTW, I think the demise mecha anime has been exaggerated. It's not as popular as it once was, but people still make shows about giant robots. They'll never stop making Gundam shows, Darling in the Franxx is airing now, and Full Metal Panic is coming back this year for goodness sake!
70 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
29 / F
Offline
Posted 3/29/18 , edited 3/29/18
I agree with Devin. The Gundams are really the pinnacle of mecha genre. There are some great guides at there to help you navigate the whole series. I watched 12 episodes of Code Geass and haven't been to get into it, so I'm debating if it's worth continuing. If you can't find anything recent, the science fiction genre more generally often deals with a lot of the same themes.

In any case, start with the 80's-90's mecha, and work your way up. You'll appreciate the genre more if you watch it chronologically.
34566 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
48 / M
Offline
Posted 3/29/18 , edited 3/29/18
I'm an old geezer who has been watching anime since the 70s. Anime tends to go in cycles where genres are prevalent and popular. Right now, mecha is on a comparative downswing. But, It will see a rise again. One thing that keeps mecha going is model kit and toy sales. There are many series that are put out almost solely for this reason (Gundam Build Fighters and Zoids come to mind). As long as people are willing to buy enough kits, we will continue to see new mecha series.
I personally am looking forward to Jushinki Pandora. It is created by Shoji Kawamori, the same man who is behind Macross and Aquarion. I'm just disappointed that the USA will probably have to wait until after the season is finished to watch it, since it is on Netflix.
11227 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Offline
Posted 4/1/18 , edited 4/1/18
Mecha, dead? Not a chance. It may be in a holding pattern for the past decade along with the rest of the anime industry, but it is among the tropes guaranteed to exist as long as there is anime:

Sentai 5
Mecha
Martial Arts
Magical Girl
Moe
Yokai
242 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / M
Offline
Posted 4/2/18 , edited 4/2/18

Commander_PonyShep wrote:

I noticed in that one video I watched, as well as from other people, that mecha anime is just a passing fad that's being replaced right now with sexualized adolescent girls, or "waifus" as anime fans would rather call them. It hit its peak with Code Geass and Gurren Lagann, but afterward faded into existence now that everything has to be waifus, idols, monster girls, and a variety of other types of sexy teenage anime girls.

So why is mecha not as popular as it used to be, even with the rise of streaming? And should I still like mecha even if I'm behind the times, because of, again, the rise of the "waifu"?


Well if you have 30 minutes to kill, Gigguk has gone into more detail than you ever wanted to know.

In summary, part of what killed it was "gunpla and merchandise is annoying to build compared to figurines" and "anime series are too short and mecha anime need to be 50+ episode epics." Plus, gundam series are apparently only OVAs these days.

As for the last part...it's up to you! On the one hand, you'll have less people to talk about your favorite shows with, but on the other hand being behind the times means you're watching what you like- and that's why you started watching anime in the first place isn't it?
60974 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
37 / M / Planet Sanno
Offline
Posted 4/13/18 , edited 4/13/18
Unfortunately, I was back in Lurker Mode when this was posted, and it looks like everybody else has answered the question satisfactorily, but I did read the topic.


plaidypuss wrote:
Maybe people that feel Mecha is a passing fad have never played Super Robot Taisen.


As a big fan of that franchise (currently waiting for SRWX to release and ship), I think it's a bit ... different. Mecha is hardly a "fad". It's been around too long, and it's too ingrained into anime history. It's just not nearly as prominent as it used to be, and trying to talk about it outside of genre-specific forums like SRWG and MAHQ is pretty pointless.
First  Prev  1  2  3  4  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.