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which martial arts style u think is the best? why
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31 / M / Oslo, Norway
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Posted 2/12/12
Drunken brawling. Hands down.
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20 / M / U.K
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Posted 2/13/12
There's no such thing as the best martial art, it's about how strong and determined you are to perfect whatever martial art your learning.

Having said tae kwon doe is sick! Who doesn't like kicking people?

P.S. does boxing count as a martial art?
Posted 2/13/12
I like to paint.
Posted 2/13/12
The Way of the Gun. Taser-Do. Pepper spray-Do.

You know, all those things you're not supposed to have in places like England.

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18 / M / Sea of Nostalgia
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Posted 2/13/12
Muay Tai. You use many parts of your body and it's agressive fighting style is good to end a quick fight. Very violent though
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24 / F / Manila
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Posted 2/13/12 , edited 2/13/12
I prefer learning Aikido but I love Bruce Lee's style
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21 / Dreamscape
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Posted 2/13/12
I can't say that there is a "Best Martial Art" however if you get to the point where you have effectively mastered the techniques of one art and want to learn another to add to the techniques you already know then you will become a better (More rounded) martial artist. So I suppose in conclusion I should say that mixed martial arts is the best martial art.
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Posted 2/13/12
Well, combining martial arts is the best idea (Way of the Intercepting Fist anyone?), but the best martial art isn't MMA. Because MMA = Wrestling + a bit of kickboxing. It's quite the misnomer.
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34 / M / The Void.
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Posted 2/13/12
The best style is a style that adapts to any given situation. What style is that? I have no idea.
Posted 3/14/12

T-Dog2295 wrote:

There's no such thing as the best martial art, it's about how strong and determined you are to perfect whatever martial art your learning.

Having said tae kwon doe is sick! Who doesn't like kicking people?

P.S. does boxing count as a martial art?


No because boxing doesn't have any forms. Only boxing within:

UFC (Mixed Martial Arts)
Kickboxing
or Thai Boxing (Muay Thai)

is considered Martial Art.
Posted 3/14/12

Rina-San wrote:


T-Dog2295 wrote:

There's no such thing as the best martial art, it's about how strong and determined you are to perfect whatever martial art your learning.

Having said tae kwon doe is sick! Who doesn't like kicking people?

P.S. does boxing count as a martial art?


No because boxing doesn't have any forms. Only boxing within:

UFC (Mixed Martial Arts)
Kickboxing
or Thai Boxing (Muay Thai)

is considered Martial Art.


Just curious, why are forms the defining aspect of a martial art to you?

And that said, why is boxing within UFC/MMA considered a martial art? Plenty of MMA-oriented schools do not in any way have forms -- and back to boxing, it does have a systematized set of learned skills placed within a specific context, like wrestling, jujitsu, or muay thai.
Posted 3/14/12

BlaculaKuchuki wrote:

Just curious, why are forms the defining aspect of a martial art to you?

And that said, why is boxing within UFC/MMA considered a martial art? Plenty of MMA-oriented schools do not in any way have forms -- and back to boxing, it does have a systematized set of learned skills placed within a specific context, like wrestling, jujitsu, or muay thai.


Boxing only incorporates fists (it's a sport not a martial art).

Martial arts are applied for practical use so any restrictions of major parts of the body is not a martial art. (i.e. neglecting the whole lower body)
Posted 3/14/12

Ho_oH wrote:


BlaculaKuchuki wrote:

Just curious, why are forms the defining aspect of a martial art to you?

And that said, why is boxing within UFC/MMA considered a martial art? Plenty of MMA-oriented schools do not in any way have forms -- and back to boxing, it does have a systematized set of learned skills placed within a specific context, like wrestling, jujitsu, or muay thai.


Boxing only incorporates fists (it's a sport not a martial art).

Martial arts are applied for practical use so any restrictions of major parts of the body is not a martial art. (i.e. neglecting the whole lower body)


Um...if that were true, you just knocked out half of what are openly regarded as and taught as martial arts -- maybe more than half if you consider the abbreviated versions of martial arts taught around the world. Examples right off the top of my head -- Tae Kwon Do does not really have a viable grappling component (yeah there are a few trips and wrist locks but they are supplemental at best). Aikido ignores an enormous range of potential physical tools in order to comply with a specific philosophical vision. Judo ignores punching and only teaches minimal leg submissions. Several of the '-do' Japanese martial arts expressly set aside 'practical use' in favor of exploring a physical, mental, and spiritual total approach to life that is not always that practical to combat.

So again...what defines the term 'martial art?'

Posted 3/14/12

BlaculaKuchuki wrote:

Um...if that were true, you just knocked out half of what are openly regarded as and taught as martial arts -- maybe more than half if you consider the abbreviated versions of martial arts taught around the world. Examples right off the top of my head -- Tae Kwon Do does not really have a viable grappling component (yeah there are a few trips and wrist locks but they are supplemental at best). Aikido ignores an enormous range of potential physical tools in order to comply with a specific philosophical vision. Judo ignores punching and only teaches minimal leg submissions. Several of the '-do' Japanese martial arts expressly set aside 'practical use' in favor of exploring a physical, mental, and spiritual total approach to life that is not always that practical to combat.

So again...what defines the term 'martial art?'


How they are modernly taught does not change the status of a martial art.

A martial art does not have to teach both grappling and striking, it just needs to teach effective self defense. TKD, Judo and Aikido teach forms to counter specific moves from the opponent - including strikes to whatever area of the body, and grappling attacks. Boxing does not teach practical counters against the vast possibilities of attacks one can do. (attacking from behind, headlock, etc. etc. etc.)

Aikido in essence avoids striking in the first place. Judo ignores punching however it is not necessary to learn punching in the first place.
Posted 3/15/12

BlaculaKuchuki wrote:


Rina-San wrote:


T-Dog2295 wrote:

There's no such thing as the best martial art, it's about how strong and determined you are to perfect whatever martial art your learning.

Having said tae kwon doe is sick! Who doesn't like kicking people?

P.S. does boxing count as a martial art?


No because boxing doesn't have any forms. Only boxing within:

UFC (Mixed Martial Arts)
Kickboxing
or Thai Boxing (Muay Thai)

is considered Martial Art.


Just curious, why are forms the defining aspect of a martial art to you?

And that said, why is boxing within UFC/MMA considered a martial art? Plenty of MMA-oriented schools do not in any way have forms -- and back to boxing, it does have a systematized set of learned skills placed within a specific context, like wrestling, jujitsu, or muay thai.


Its just not, have you ever referred to a Boxer as a martial artist? Or heard someone refer to the sport as a martial art? Not to say that it isn't an effective fighting technique though.
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