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[LotW] Japanese Lessons
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Posted 5/15/08

durana wrote:


this could be helpful
just try not to mix them up


uhmm... im just curious
which of this two characters is always used in japanese? katakana or hiragana?
...and..i think katakana is easier to use

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Posted 5/16/08
COULD I JOIN THIS CLASS?
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Posted 5/20/08
i wold prefer that katakana is the easiest hand writting
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Posted 5/29/08

anime-emina wrote:


durana wrote:


this could be helpful
just try not to mix them up


uhmm... im just curious
which of this two characters is always used in japanese? katakana or hiragana?
...and..i think katakana is easier to use



I think Katakana...cos that's the one I always see ^-^
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Posted 5/29/08
wwhiiiieeewww
nice lessons you have here ^^
aww
yosh its decided i'm going to join this class one way or another
hehe lol ^^
please let me in this class too thanks ^^
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Posted 5/29/08

Inverse_Gal wrote:


anime-emina wrote:


durana wrote:


this could be helpful
just try not to mix them up


uhmm... im just curious
which of this two characters is always used in japanese? katakana or hiragana?
...and..i think katakana is easier to use



I think Katakana...cos that's the one I always see ^-^


o0o..thnx for the reply^^

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Posted 5/30/08 , edited 5/30/08

anime-emina wrote:


Inverse_Gal wrote:


anime-emina wrote:


durana wrote:


this could be helpful
just try not to mix them up


uhmm... im just curious
which of this two characters is always used in japanese? katakana or hiragana?
...and..i think katakana is easier to use



I think Katakana...cos that's the one I always see ^-^


o0o..thnx for the reply^^



no..its both actually

cause katakana for foreign word like "television" is written as terebi (テレビ)
katakana also use for country names, foreign places, and personal names.

i hate explain it so here goes for hiragana:

Hiragana are used for words for which there are no kanji, including particles such as kara から "from," and suffixes such as ~san さん "Mr., Mrs., Miss, Ms." Hiragana are also used in words for which the kanji form is not known to the writer nor the readers or is too formal for the writing purpose.

Verb and adjective inflections, as, for example, BE MA SHI TA (べました) in tabemashita (食べました, tabemashita? "ate"), are written in hiragana. In this case, part of the root is also written in hiragana. Hiragana are also used to give the pronunciation of kanji in a reading aid called furigana.

The article Japanese writing system discusses in detail when the various systems of writing are used.

this is copy and paste

for more information:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katakana
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hiragana

uhh....btw..can i join this class please..
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Posted 5/30/08

-maxx- wrote:


anime-emina wrote:


Inverse_Gal wrote:


anime-emina wrote:


durana wrote:


this could be helpful
just try not to mix them up


uhmm... im just curious
which of this two characters is always used in japanese? katakana or hiragana?
...and..i think katakana is easier to use



I think Katakana...cos that's the one I always see ^-^


o0o..thnx for the reply^^



no..its both actually

cause katakana for foreign word like "television" is written as terebi (テレビ)
katakana also use for country names, foreign places, and personal names.

i hate explain it so here goes for hiragana:

Hiragana are used for words for which there are no kanji, including particles such as kara から "from," and suffixes such as ~san さん "Mr., Mrs., Miss, Ms." Hiragana are also used in words for which the kanji form is not known to the writer nor the readers or is too formal for the writing purpose.

Verb and adjective inflections, as, for example, BE MA SHI TA (べました) in tabemashita (食べました, tabemashita? "ate"), are written in hiragana. In this case, part of the root is also written in hiragana. Hiragana are also used to give the pronunciation of kanji in a reading aid called furigana.

The article Japanese writing system discusses in detail when the various systems of writing are used.

this is copy and paste

for more information:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katakana
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hiragana

uhh....btw..can i join this class please..


oh now I understand tnx
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Posted 5/31/08
konnichiwa minna-san,..can i join here??can i??please.,please i really want to know how to speak japanese,..thank you,..just send me a message iF u agree^_^,..sayonara
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Posted 6/15/08

Arcobaleno wrote:

Lesson One - Substitution Table No. 1

_____________________________________________________

Kore Wa......................Hon des'
Sore Wa......................empits' des' ka?
Are Wa........................kami dewa arimasen

Left Sequence
1.Kore wa hon des'. ------------------------ This is a Book
2.Sore wa hon desu'.----------------------- That is a Book
3.Are wa Hon desu'. ---------------------- That Over there is a book.
4.Kore wa empits' des'ka?--------------- Is this a pencil?
5.Sore wa Empits' des'ka?-------------- Is that a pencil?
6.Are wa empits' des' ka?--------------- Is that over there a pencil?
7.Kore wa kami dewa arimasen------- This is not a paper.
8.Sore wa Kami dewa Arimasen------ That is not a paper.
9.Are wa kami dewa arimasen--------- That over there is not a paper.


_____________________________________________________

The above is a simple substitution table consisting two parts. By combining a line from each part we get nine different combinations,all which are good Japanese sentences.


How to Study

1.Read the Japanese sentences in the above order comparing them with their English translation.
2.Read the Japanese sentences without looking at the translation and see if you know the meaning.
3.Read the Sentences in irregular order,jumping and skipping backwards and forwards until you can read the sentences with understanding.
4.Look at the translation and try to recall a corresponding Japanese sentence.

Pronounciation



Short Vowels

There are five vowels in Japanese. Each Vowel may be long or short. In this lesson we shall take up short vowels only.
a The first vowel of eye (ai) or out (aut); it resembles the a in father or far,but is much shorter.
i Approximately equivalent to i of machine; but is much shorter.
uThere is nothing like this in english. Do not believe such a statement as the Japanese u sound being the same as u in put,full, etc. The essential difference between the Japanese u and English u lies in the shape of the mouth. The Japanese u is articulated with unrounded lips where as the English u is pronounced with rounded lips.
e For practical purposes this is the same as e in get, pen,etc.
oPractically the same as o in oil,coin,etc. Aw in saw,paw,etc., if short,will answer the purpose.

Consonants

The consonants are pronounced about the same as in English with the exception of a few. Among the English alphabet, l,q,v, and x are not used.
n The final n is pronounced hakf-way between the English n and ng.


Vocabulary
Kore ----------------------------------------------> this
sore ----------------------------------------------> that (something which is close to the 2nd person)
are-------------------------------------------------> that over there
wa-------------------------------------------------> a particl or postposition which shows that the word or words preceding it is usually in the nominative case
hon------------------------------------------------> a book
empits'(empitsu)-----------------------------> a pencil (the final u is not pronounced in ordinary speech)
kami----------------------------------------------> paper
des'(desu)--------------------------------------> is,are,etc. (the final u is usually mute)
ka-------------------------------------------------> a particle which denotes interrogation or doubt
dewa arimasen-------------------------------> is not,are not,etc. ; the negative form of desu



Grammar and Construction

In Japanese the construction (A is is expressed by A (noun or pronoun) wa B(noun or pronoun)desu.
A question is usually expressed with this particle ka at the end of a sentence. Thus, (Is A B?) is A wa B desu ka?
The negative Form,(A is not B) is expressed by construction
A wa B dewa Arimasen.
Dewa in rapid, familiar speech usually becomes jaa orja.
The answer to this question is
Hai,A wa B desu.
or Iie,A wa B dewa arimasen.But a short answer is
Hai so desu.(Yes it is so.)
orIie,so dewa arimasen(No it is not so)


More Words

tsukue --------------------------------->a desk
isu--------------------------------------->a chair
pen-------------------------------------->a pen
inki-------------------------------------->ink
jibiki------------------------------------>a dictionary

Exercise 1

Express in Japanese the following.

1. Is this a desk? 2. That is not a pencil. 3. Is that over there a pen? 4. This is not ink. 5. That is a dictionary. 6. Is that a paper? 7. That over there is not a chair. 8. This is a pencil. 9. That over there is a desk. 10 That over there is not a dictionary.

__________________________________________________

It was hard.... My back hurts.... I might have some errors... P-please... tell me.. so I could edit it....


o.o....e-e-eto...arigatou for the explanation....X3
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Posted 7/3/08

emm0548 wrote:

this is so cool... about the Hiragana/ katakana..... i think they should start learning the most basic between KAnji, Katakana, Hiragana.... (wc is hiragana)

can i contribute something then?

HIRAGANA Chart



do you have katakana chart?
Students
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Posted 7/3/08

Arcobaleno wrote:

Lesson One - Substitution Table No. 1

_____________________________________________________

Kore Wa......................Hon des'
Sore Wa......................empits' des' ka?
Are Wa........................kami dewa arimasen

Left Sequence
1.Kore wa hon des'. ------------------------ This is a Book
2.Sore wa hon desu'.----------------------- That is a Book
3.Are wa Hon desu'. ---------------------- That Over there is a book.
4.Kore wa empits' des'ka?--------------- Is this a pencil?
5.Sore wa Empits' des'ka?-------------- Is that a pencil?
6.Are wa empits' des' ka?--------------- Is that over there a pencil?
7.Kore wa kami dewa arimasen------- This is not a paper.
8.Sore wa Kami dewa Arimasen------ That is not a paper.
9.Are wa kami dewa arimasen--------- That over there is not a paper.


_____________________________________________________

The above is a simple substitution table consisting two parts. By combining a line from each part we get nine different combinations,all which are good Japanese sentences.


How to Study

1.Read the Japanese sentences in the above order comparing them with their English translation.
2.Read the Japanese sentences without looking at the translation and see if you know the meaning.
3.Read the Sentences in irregular order,jumping and skipping backwards and forwards until you can read the sentences with understanding.
4.Look at the translation and try to recall a corresponding Japanese sentence.

Pronounciation



Short Vowels

There are five vowels in Japanese. Each Vowel may be long or short. In this lesson we shall take up short vowels only.
a The first vowel of eye (ai) or out (aut); it resembles the a in father or far,but is much shorter.
i Approximately equivalent to i of machine; but is much shorter.
uThere is nothing like this in english. Do not believe such a statement as the Japanese u sound being the same as u in put,full, etc. The essential difference between the Japanese u and English u lies in the shape of the mouth. The Japanese u is articulated with unrounded lips where as the English u is pronounced with rounded lips.
e For practical purposes this is the same as e in get, pen,etc.
oPractically the same as o in oil,coin,etc. Aw in saw,paw,etc., if short,will answer the purpose.

Consonants

The consonants are pronounced about the same as in English with the exception of a few. Among the English alphabet, l,q,v, and x are not used.
n The final n is pronounced hakf-way between the English n and ng.


Vocabulary
Kore ----------------------------------------------> this
sore ----------------------------------------------> that (something which is close to the 2nd person)
are-------------------------------------------------> that over there
wa-------------------------------------------------> a particl or postposition which shows that the word or words preceding it is usually in the nominative case
hon------------------------------------------------> a book
empits'(empitsu)-----------------------------> a pencil (the final u is not pronounced in ordinary speech)
kami----------------------------------------------> paper
des'(desu)--------------------------------------> is,are,etc. (the final u is usually mute)
ka-------------------------------------------------> a particle which denotes interrogation or doubt
dewa arimasen-------------------------------> is not,are not,etc. ; the negative form of desu



Grammar and Construction

In Japanese the construction (A is is expressed by A (noun or pronoun) wa B(noun or pronoun)desu.
A question is usually expressed with this particle ka at the end of a sentence. Thus, (Is A B?) is A wa B desu ka?
The negative Form,(A is not B) is expressed by construction
A wa B dewa Arimasen.
Dewa in rapid, familiar speech usually becomes jaa orja.
The answer to this question is
Hai,A wa B desu.
or Iie,A wa B dewa arimasen.But a short answer is
Hai so desu.(Yes it is so.)
orIie,so dewa arimasen(No it is not so)


More Words

tsukue --------------------------------->a desk
isu--------------------------------------->a chair
pen-------------------------------------->a pen
inki-------------------------------------->ink
jibiki------------------------------------>a dictionary

Exercise 1

Express in Japanese the following.

1. Is this a desk? 2. That is not a pencil. 3. Is that over there a pen? 4. This is not ink. 5. That is a dictionary. 6. Is that a paper? 7. That over there is not a chair. 8. This is a pencil. 9. That over there is a desk. 10 That over there is not a dictionary.

__________________________________________________

It was hard.... My back hurts.... I might have some errors... P-please... tell me.. so I could edit it....


cheers for you! thanks! i learned japanese a little!
Students
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Posted 7/3/08
Counting in Japanese

The numbers from one to ten are pronounced as follows:
one - ichi
two - ni
three - san
four - shi
five - go
six - roku
seven - shichi
eight - hachi
nine - kyu
ten - ju


Above ten the numbers are pronounced differently: for example the number 11 in Japanese is translated as "10 plus 1"
eleven - ju ichi
twelve - ju ni
thirteen - ju san
fourteen - ju shi
fifteen - ju go
sixteen - ju roku
seventeen - ju shichi
eighteen - ju hachi
nineteen - ju kyu


Above the number twenty the numbers are again pronounced in a slightly different manner. For example the number 20 in Japanese translates as "2 - 10's" and continuing on therefore, the number 21 would be considered as "2 - 10's plus 1"
twenty ni ju
twenty-one = ni juichi
twenty-two = ni juni

and so on - all the way up to the number 99.

For example the number 56 would be "5 - 10's plus 6" - or - "gojuroku" - the number 61 would then be "6 - 10's plus 1" - or - "rokujuichi" and so on and so on.

The number 100 is pronounced as "hyaku" so counting above 100 is basically just a matter of adding the word "hyaku" in the appropriate place and then following the same general principle for example the number 150 is pronounced as "hyakugoju".

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Posted 7/5/08

absgamboa wrote:

Counting in Japanese

The numbers from one to ten are pronounced as follows:
one - ichi
two - ni
three - san
four - shi
five - go
six - roku
seven - shichi
eight - hachi
nine - kyu
ten - ju


Above ten the numbers are pronounced differently: for example the number 11 in Japanese is translated as "10 plus 1"
eleven - ju ichi
twelve - ju ni
thirteen - ju san
fourteen - ju shi
fifteen - ju go
sixteen - ju roku
seventeen - ju shichi
eighteen - ju hachi
nineteen - ju kyu


Above the number twenty the numbers are again pronounced in a slightly different manner. For example the number 20 in Japanese translates as "2 - 10's" and continuing on therefore, the number 21 would be considered as "2 - 10's plus 1"
twenty ni ju
twenty-one = ni juichi
twenty-two = ni juni

and so on - all the way up to the number 99.

For example the number 56 would be "5 - 10's plus 6" - or - "gojuroku" - the number 61 would then be "6 - 10's plus 1" - or - "rokujuichi" and so on and so on.

The number 100 is pronounced as "hyaku" so counting above 100 is basically just a matter of adding the word "hyaku" in the appropriate place and then following the same general principle for example the number 150 is pronounced as "hyakugoju".



hey! thanks a lot.. i just wanna ask.. how will i say my age in japanese? thanks!
Students
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Posted 7/5/08
Im not sure with this. But as far as I can remember this is how to say my age.


I am (age) years old

Watashi wa (ni-juni) nan toshi desu.
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