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Posted 4/25/08
what is the meaning of " daite " and " pikanchi "
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Posted 4/25/08 , edited 4/25/08
Daite is the "te" form of "Daku," which means "To Embrace".

I honestly don't know what pikanchi means, nor did I find it in my dictionaries. I would guess that it's the name of a game or something to that effect.
Posted 4/28/08 , edited 4/28/08
Hi everybody ^^ i have a question about the kanji's lol
Basically i dont know when to use the onreading and the kun-reading.
The on-reading is the traditional chinese and the kun reading the japanese meaning of a kanji (?)...

kanji:新 :
on-reading 新聞 - shinbun (newspaper)
kun-reading: 新しい -atara(shii) (new)

sooo... how do i know which one to choose. And when do i use "atara"? or is "atara" just the meaning of new?
now this is really confusing and i cant make a really good question out of this because i just dont know how it works XP
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Posted 4/30/08
thanks. how about kisaragi. what is it? it's actually a word that written in katakana so probably it's a foreign word for..?
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Posted 5/1/08

koutasan wrote:

Hi everybody ^^ i have a question about the kanji's lol
Basically i dont know when to use the onreading and the kun-reading.
The on-reading is the traditional chinese and the kun reading the japanese meaning of a kanji (?)...

kanji:新 :

on-reading 新聞 - shinbun (newspaper)
kun-reading: 新しい -atara(shii) (new)

sooo... how do i know which one to choose. And when do i use "atara"? or is "atara" just the meaning of new?
now this is really confusing and i cant make a really good question out of this because i just dont know how it works XP

I also don't know when you use kun-yomi and on-yomi. My Jap teacher explained this before...but then I forgot Although I do remember the time when my classmate asked about the same thing. My teacher just shrugged and said "You just have to memorize."

I guess that's what she always replied, ne?
Posted 5/1/08

ehcie-utada wrote:

I also don't know when you use kun-yomi and on-yomi. My Jap teacher explained this before...but then I forgot Although I do remember the time when my classmate asked about the same thing. My teacher just shrugged and said "You just have to memorize."

I guess that's what she always replied, ne?


lol gotta love those teachers xD
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Posted 5/1/08 , edited 5/1/08

koutasan wrote:

Hi everybody ^^ i have a question about the kanji's lol
Basically i dont know when to use the onreading and the kun-reading.
The on-reading is the traditional chinese and the kun reading the japanese meaning of a kanji (?)...

kanji:新
on-reading 新聞 - shinbun (newspaper)
kun-reading: 新しい -atara(shii) (new)

sooo... how do i know which one to choose. And when do i use "atara"? or is "atara" just the meaning of new?
now this is really confusing and i cant make a really good question out of this because i just dont know how it works XP


Um, I'm no expert at kanji (hehe, actually I'm still stuck on studying year 2 kanjis >_>) , but I think I can give some advice.

First of all, yes, on-readings are the readings that came from Chinese and kun-readings are the Japanese ones.

(Okurigana = hiragana used for writing the ends of words, like in 新しい )

1. if the kanji is used "alone", meaning there's no okurigana or other kanji attached to it and it forms a word by itself, you use the kun-reading
examples: 人 / ひと / person、 山 / やま / mountain、 犬 / いぬ / dog

2. if the kanji or kanji combination has okurigana, you use the kun-reading
examples: 新しい / あたらしい / new、 大きい / おおきい / big、 入り口 / いりぐち / entrance (can also be written 入口)

3. if the kanji combination has no okurigana, you use the on-reading
examples: 人口 / じんこう / population、 電車 / でんしゃ / a train

4. the kanji that are used to form one word are usually read with either only on- or only kun-readings (like in densha or jinkou - both use only on-readings) but there are also some that mix the two (..sorry, like I said I'm still new at kanji, I don't remember knowing any examples of these x__X someone please tell, if you know any~)

5. names are often read with the kun-reading
examples: 田中 / たなか、 山田 / やまだ

---
(this really isn't about when to use on and when kun anymore, just more info about reading kanji in general, in case someone's interested..)

6. there are some words that are written with certain kanjis solely for the meanings of those kanjis - so they don't follow the "normal" on/kun-readings, for example 大人 / おとな / adult, which would in "normal" conditions be pronounced as "dainin" - now it's "otona". So in this case the kanjis are used only because of their meanings, not because of their readings. (大="big" 人="person")
Then again on the opposite, there are also words that are written with certain kanjis because of the readings of those kanjis, so the meanings of the kanjis really have nothing to do with it, for example 出来る / できる / "be able to" (among other things..dekiru has a few different translations depending on the context.. >_>).

7. some kanji combinations can be read in more than one way, for example
一日 / ついたち (=1st day of the month) or いちじつ / いちにち (= 1 day)

---

NOTE
These aren't waterproof rules or anything, if there's one thing you can count on when learning languages it's that there are bound to be exceptions. These are only general guidelines that apply for the majority of kanji and with these you should get a good percent of stuff right. But it never hurts to just memorize everything.

Also, there are kanji that have only on- or kun-readings so in those cases it's pretty easy to figure out what to use.

I hope this helped at least a little and that it was understandable, I'm pretty bad at explaining in English. :/

Sorry, if there are any mistakes (in the content or in my English or Japanese).
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Posted 5/3/08
just wana ask. . .i often hear this word whenever i'm watching jdoramas: "janenokayo". . .(i don't know how to write this word). . .what's its use?. . .^_^
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Posted 5/16/08
Hm... I think there should be a word before "janenokayo"...

I think it has something pertaining to "not".
Since -Janai means not and is usually colloquially pronounced as -jane..

I could be wrong. Dx
Posted 5/19/08
Thnx for the kanji information ^_^

i do have another question =[
They should make a book with 100000 pages and once finished ur fluent japanese.. cough think im actually refering to a dictionary... >_<

anyways:

can someone tell me what this ー does in japanese sentences? not refering to kanji "ichi"
like: リーグ like this one. ri gu and what does that stripe? =P
btw i have difficulties pronouncing the R in japanese... some people say i'm better of sayling Li because JP people dont have the rolling sounds.. =[

thnx ^_^
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Posted 5/22/08

koutasan wrote:

can someone tell me what this ー does in japanese sentences? not refering to kanji "ichi"
like: リーグ like this one. ri gu and what does that stripe? =P


It marks a double vowel. Unlike in hiragana writing, where they're
ああ aa
いい ii
うう uu
えい (/ ええ) ee
おう (/ おお) oo,
when writing katakana, you just write the other vowel with ー.

So リーグ reads as riigu.

other examples:
ケーキ keeki - cake
リリース ririisu - release
テーブル teeburu - table

Posted 5/24/08

awatemono wrote:

It marks a double vowel. Unlike in hiragana writing, where they're
ああ aa
いい ii
うう uu
えい (/ ええ) ee
おう (/ おお) oo,
when writing katakana, you just write the other vowel with ー.

So リーグ reads as riigu.

other examples:
ケーキ keeki - cake
リリース ririisu - release
テーブル teeburu - table



Ahh i see thnx ^^
So you make the vowel sounds twice as long right? =P

one more little question lol
えい (/ ええ) ee
おう (/ おお) oo,

are those ^ just pronounced as if it would be ええand おお but <~~ is wrong?
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Posted 5/25/08
ei = Eh-ii
ou = oo-u!
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Posted 5/26/08

koutasan wrote:

So you make the vowel sounds twice as long right? =P


Yea, that's right...I guess a long vowel is a better way to say it in English than "double vowel".



えい (/ ええ) ee
おう (/ おお) oo,

are those ^ just pronounced as if it would be ええand おお but <~~ is wrong? :P


Kind of, yes.

Often "ei" is pronounced as a long e and "ou" as a long o-sound, like in for example sensei, deshou.
This is also one of the things where the romanizations differ... like some romanize ありがとう as arigatou, others as arigatô, etc.

There are some words, however, that have a long e-sound written as ee and a long o-sound as oo,
for example おおきい and おねえさん.

But note: えい/おう is pronounced as ei/ou (not ee/oo) if the sounds do not belong to the same kanji, meaning the first kanji ends with e/o and the following begins with i/u. And with katakana, if they aren't pronouced as a long vowel, you don't use the ー but write them normally: スペイン.
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