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Suicide
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Posted 6/18/12
I had strong thoughts of such when I was younger and was very close to following through with it but ended up chickening out.

And I'm glad, when I look back on it, because I would have missed out on a LOT of things in life.
Posted 6/21/12 , edited 6/21/12
Never. There are so many problems in the world, I'd be a selfish prick to wanna kill myself because any of my "problems", lol.
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24 / 私自身の不思議の国
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Posted 7/15/12
When I noticed that someone else needs me in her/his life, so I didn't do it.
I thanked my friends for trying me out when I'm in the dark place, plus I have a little sister who may need of my guidance.
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18 / M / bloomington, IL
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Posted 7/16/12
well my cousin committed suicide about 3 years ago it really affected the family and still is alot and my ex tried committing suicide like very week and i always had to run across town at like 2 in the morning to her house to stop her some people don't realize that there also putting alot of stress on the people around them. i used to be really depressed about a year ago and thought what affect it would have on people if i did commit suicide but never tried its just alot of stress on people
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19 / F / HK
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Posted 7/16/12
lol I've imagined death. Can't really convince myself of the benefits of dying at the moment, but I guess I understand how stressful the "Real World" is but I believe all problems have practical resolutions, so no need in dying.

I don't think suicide is a sin, but I guess it just happens because people are pushed too far... it's a spur of the moment thing, so it's wrong, but you can't really blame someone for it or label is as a sin.
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55 / M / Covina, California
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Posted 7/21/12
NO, Suicide is not something you should EVER take lightly, Taking your own life is like saying to God that you don't appriciate the life you have, since Remember God said to Adam & Eve, " Be Fruitful, Fill the earth and subdue it " he didn't say it was okay to to end it just because your in pain at the moment, when someone takes their own life, Thats it, When your dead, your dead, your thoughts do not survive, neither does the soul. When your dead, your dead. they only thing you would do is miss out on finding mr./miss right, or your friends and those that do love you.
Posted 7/21/12 , edited 7/22/12

AcadGlade wrote:

NO, Suicide is not something you should EVER take lightly, Taking your own life is like saying to God that you don't appriciate the life you have, since Remember God said to Adam & Eve, " Be Fruitful, Fill the earth and subdue it " he didn't say it was okay to to end it just because your in pain at the moment, when someone takes their own life, Thats it, When your dead, your dead, your thoughts do not survive, neither does the soul. When your dead, your dead. they only thing you would do is miss out on finding mr./miss right, or your friends and those that do love you.
This western monotheistic religious work ethic, and its subsequent manipulation on our sense of fear through shaming and blaming, is an overgeneralized, narrow, and most of all a shallow narrative that has become the dominant worldview/strategy to cope with our death anxiety for granted. And one that's not really working at all, if ever.

Case in point, take this most resent mass-killing for example.Organized violence is a strategy for us managing our social death anxiety. In this perspective called the terror management theory, any and all institutions that we created in the interest of self-preservation/security, through the implementation of economical, political, social, and physical forces, are just ourselves unable to cope with the human condition.

Flight from Death
Flight from Death (2003) is a documentary film that investigates the relationship of human violence to fear of death, as related to subconscious influences. The film describes death anxiety as a possible root cause of many human behaviors on a psychological, spiritual, and cultural level.Flight from Death is a seven-time Best Documentary award-winning film.

The film's purpose is to investigate humankind's relationship with death, and is heavily influenced by the views of cultural anthropologist Ernest Becker. In addition to interviews with a number of contemporary philosophers, psychiatrists and teachers such as Sam Keen, Robert Jay Lifton, Irvin Yalom, Merlyn Mowrey and Daniel Liechty, the film introduces the viewer to a group of social psychologists, who conduct research in support of what they call Terror management theory (terror in this case not being terrorism, but rather emotional and psychological reaction to mortality awareness). Over the last twenty-five years, proponents of terror management theory have conducted over 300 laboratory studies demonstrating that subtle reminders of death on a subconscious level motivates a statistically significant number of subjects to exhibit biased and xenophobic type behaviors, such as gravitating toward those who they perceive as culturally similar to themselves and holding higher negative feelings and judgments toward those they perceive as culturally dissimilar to themselves.

In a recent study, the research team discovered that reminding Palestinians of their own death through subconscious means inspired conscious shifts in opinion towards wanting to become suicide bombers.This subconscious death reminder inspired the subjects to act aggressively against differing others, even at the risk of losing their own lives. Terror is the result of deep psychological forces the research described in Flight from Death suggests that these forces can be explained, yielding information about personal anxiety and the motivation of social violence.
Through that understanding, the shooter was socially manipulated by whoever institutional organization as an agent of organized violence. Yet the key for his internal transformation lies within his own experience of symbolic social death, in the form of himself as a highly educated and sophisticated, yet unemployed individual with no perceived socioeconomic worth, within a culturally individualized and capitalistic society, prior of himself been contacted by said organization. In other words, the systemic evil with its socially situated process, had displaced this otherwise good person into doing bad thing.

TEDxMidwest - Phil Zimbardo - The Nature of Evil and the Making of Heroes
Renown psychologist Phil Zimbardo asks whether the line between good and evil is fixed and impermeable or whether it is permeable; flowing across boundary in both directions. In doing so, he investigates three kinds of evil and how one's heroic disposition can combat them.
This sense of symbolic social death, though ourselves internalizing the meaning of us being unworthy of connection and belonging, is the life-crippling process of us being manipulated by our vulnerability through shame and blame.

Brene Brown: The power of vulnerability
Brene Brown studies human connection -- our ability to empathize, belong, love. In a poignant, funny talk at TEDxHouston, she shares a deep insight from her research, one that sent her on a personal quest to know herself as well as to understand humanity. A talk to share
So now the story comes in full-circle, demonstrating how the way our individualized and capitalistic society of shame and blame works, isn't really working.

TEDxMidwest - Tony Schwartz - The Way We're Working Isn't Working
Time is finite. Tony Schwarz debunks the myth that "We are meant to run like computers; at high speeds for long periods of time". He eloquently outlines how the reality of renewing our personal energy is just as important as expending it. This discipline grants value to rest which ultimately allows us to manage more skillful lives.
Because the surefire way for ourselves to skillfully manage our physical, mental, emotional/social, and spiritual energies, so that we can obtain resiliency on all four spheres and make waves, isn't through material possession, financial independence, status-seeking, nor dominance.

Jane McGonigal: The game that can give you 10 extra years of life
When game designer Jane McGonigal found herself bedridden and suicidal following a severe concussion, she had a fascinating idea for how to get better. She dove into the scientific research and created the healing game, SuperBetter. In this moving talk, McGonigal explains how a game can boost resilience -- and promises to add 7.5 minutes to your life.
So the next time you lightly belittle the subject of suicide with something as punitive as religious dogmas of life's meanings and values, take this as my fair but stern warning regarding how yourself making scapegoats out of others who dare think differently. To subdue the Earth's diverse and complex ecosystem with your rather punitive and egocentric worldview? Don't make me laugh.
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Posted 7/22/12 , edited 7/22/12
I didn't belittle suicide, I said, You Should never consider it lightly or , As I think of it now, In an emotional unstable frame of mind, And All that other stuff your quoting makes little scense , and is detracting from the simple question that was asked in the first place, Oh and if you haven't noticed, Try reading some pages before and including this one of some of the other commentors.
Posted 7/22/12 , edited 7/23/12

AcadGlade wrote:

I didn't belittle suicide, I said, You Should never consider it lightly or , As I think of it now, In an emotional unstable frame of mind, And All that other stuff your quoting makes little scense , and is detracting from the simple question that was asked in the first place, Oh and if you haven't noticed, Try reading some pages before and including this one of some of the other commentors.
Then it's your own unstable mindset that's not making sense of my comment, on how I criticized your consideration on the subject in question was so lightheaded, you're belittling life with your overgeneralizing monotheistic religious dogmas. And now you're just defusing your responsibility with your own statement, by yourself suggesting some other scapegoats. As of right now, you don't even have the courage to stick to your gun(as a figure of speech/metaphor).
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Posted 7/23/12
I will not debate the issue with you, I suggested you read some of the statments made by some of the other commentors on the subject of Suicide, And to me, simply put, The majority basically said that suicide was not a good Idea, I just gave my opinion on why one should not consider suicide, Now instead of using a Thesarus or dictionary to use high sounding words, Then I'll state my opinion this way,

There are many reasons people contemplate Suicde, Sometimes it's because of a broken relationship, sometimes it's because of a failure on a test at school, or because of being bullied at schcool, or peer pressure, or Loss of work, feelings of failure, there are numerous reasons someone would consider taking their own life, However, As one of our fellow commentors said before and I'll quote,

" I've planned. but then I realized it would be a shame just to kill myself just cause a guy. And plus would he have even noticed? I think not. And why would I hurt not only myself, but people who care for me just because of someone who doesn't care?

Like the saying:
Suicide is a permanent answer for a temporary problem "(Catz1297)

And , Killing yourself, does tell God that you don't care about your life, The same can be said of those who selfishly put themselves at risk of death doing stunts that violate the sacredness of life, and so too is the taking of one's own life.

So quit busting my chops for loving God and hoping that those who are contemplating suicide would first seek reasons to live, rather than take " A permanent answer to a temporary problem. "
Posted 7/23/12 , edited 7/23/12

AcadGlade wrote:

I will not debate the issue with you, I suggested you read some of the statments made by some of the other commentors on the subject of Suicide, And to me, simply put, The majority basically said that suicide was not a good Idea, I just gave my opinion on why one should not consider suicide, Now instead of using a Thesarus or dictionary to use high sounding words, Then I'll state my opinion this way,

There are many reasons people contemplate Suicde, Sometimes it's because of a broken relationship, sometimes it's because of a failure on a test at school, or because of being bullied at schcool, or peer pressure, or Loss of work, feelings of failure, there are numerous reasons someone would consider taking their own life, However, As one of our fellow commentors said before and I'll quote,

" I've planned. but then I realized it would be a shame just to kill myself just cause a guy. And plus would he have even noticed? I think not. And why would I hurt not only myself, but people who care for me just because of someone who doesn't care?

Like the saying:
Suicide is a permanent answer for a temporary problem "(Catz1297)

And , Killing yourself, does tell God that you don't care about your life, The same can be said of those who selfishly put themselves at risk of death doing stunts that violate the sacredness of life, and so too is the taking of one's own life.

So quit busting my chops for loving God and hoping that those who are contemplating suicide would first seek reasons to live, rather than take " A permanent answer to a temporary problem. "
Quit busting your chops? I'll remind you that you're the one who busted yours, when you had to rely on someone's relatively naive opinion on the subject of suicide, who you've three times the seniority over.

You don't have authority to dictate my intent. Just as how you've lost your original position, when you decided to appeal to others' opinion. You're simply running towards and hiding behind others as scapegoats, while you've no courage to face your rather shallow and irresponsible statement.

Also, there's a difference between contemplating suicide objectively, as opposed to going through the experience of social death due to shame, but not due to grief. And my criticism lies in the fact that your opinion, as well as your so called "majority" consensus, doesn't resolve the life-crippling experience of social death by shame. Because you're applying the same strategy of shaming and blaming, onto those who contemplated about killing themselves. Just like how your beloved God would, through His works with the Church, by making the subject of suicide a taboo, while stigmatizing the act itself.

JD Schramm: Break the silence for suicide attempt survivors
Even when our lives appear fine from the outside, locked within can be a world of quiet suffering, leading some to the decision to end their life. At TEDYou, JD Schramm asks us to break the silence surrounding suicide and suicide attempts, and to create much-needed resources to help people who reclaim their life after escaping death.

Research shows that 19 out of 20 people who attempt suicide will fail. But the people who fail are 37 times more likely to succeed the second time. This truly is an at-risk population with very few resources to support them. And what happens when people try to assemble themselves back into life, because of our taboos around suicide, we're not sure what to say, and so quite often we say nothing. And that furthers the isolation that people like John found themselves in.

I know John's story very well because I'm John. And this is, today, the first time in any sort of public setting I've ever acknowledged the journey that I have been on. But after having lost a beloved teacher in 2006 and a good friend last year to suicide, and sitting last year at TEDActive, I knew that I needed to step out of my silence and past my taboos to talk about an idea worth spreading -- and that is that people who have made the difficult choice to come back to life need more resources and need our help.
Shame and taboo. Shame and taboo. Do you know who's been manipulating our vulnerability through shame and taboo? The monotheistic religious organizations. And they're not "temporary problem", or so you've claimed. But rather, they're historically well documented, institutionalized, and well enforced organized violence with religious zeal.

The History of Suicide
Ancient History

Initially, suicide was not considered a cultural taboo. To the ancient Egyptians, suicide was not a violation of either the spiritual or legal code. Suicide was seen as a just way to die if one was faced with unendurable suffering - be it physical or emotional. Martyrdom was acceptable when faced with civil or religious persecution. The first person to debate the morality of suicide was the Greek philosopher, Socrates - over 400 years before the birth of Christ. Socrates believed that human beings were the property of the gods, and did not have the right to take away something, namely life, that did not belong to them. Ironically, he was accused of impiety and forced to take his own life by drinking hemlock. The Greek leader Epicurus encouraged his followers to die by suicide when their lives no longer afforded happiness. Roman society hosted trained technicians who would perform assisted suicides when their clients desired to die. Most early civilizations viewed suicide as a means of escaping an unbearable existence, or of releasing loved ones from the burden associated with caring for the sick or elderly. There was no judgment attached to such a death.

Early Jewish/Christian Struggles

During the early years of Christianity, many believers chose suicide over the difficult life of religious persecution. In fact, some early Christian writers maintained that a self-chosen death was a goal for the genuinely pious to aspire. The number of Christian martyrs and mass suicides rose so quickly that the ruling Jewish faction decided to forbid eulogies and public mourning for those who died by their own hand. This action began the stigmatization of suicide in Judeo-Christian culture. The first church-led condemnation of suicide occurred when Jewish leaders refused to allow the bodies of Christian suicide victims to be buried in hallowed ground. The few Christian condemnations of suicide came from the notion that suicide was to be despised because it was the action of the betrayer of Jesus. Thus, suicide developed a “guilt by association” because of Judas’ death by hanging.

Christian Condemnation

The first Christian to publicly denounce suicide as a sin was St. Augustine in the 4th Century. The basis of Augustine’s condemnation was the ubiquitous acts of suicide among Christians. Augustine’s influence on church doctrine resulted in a series of conciliar developments. In 305AD, the Council of Guadix purged from the list of martyrs all who had died by their own hand. Using the pretext of piety, the 348AD Council of Carthage condemned those who had chosen self death for personal reasons and the 363AD Council of Braga condemned and denied proper burial rites for all known suicides. Although meant as a preventative measure, Church condemnation festered the stigma introduced by Jewish authority years earlier. The act of suicide became immersed in shame and fear, remaining so for the next nine decades. In the 13th century Thomas Aquinas fortified the Church’s official position against suicide. Unlike Augustine, who acted to quell the surge of suicide among Christians, Aquinas was motivated by a need for intellectual understanding. Aquinas completed a comprehensive and systematic review of Christian theology, entitled Summa Theologiae. In this work, Aquinas vilified suicide as an act against God (much like Socrates) and denounced suicide as a sin for which one could not repent. Aquinas’ admonition resulted in civil and criminal laws to discourage suicide.

The Middle Ages

As a result of religious, civil, and criminal sanctions against suicide, the social stigma of suicide reached menacing heights during the Middle Ages. Not only was a person who died by his own hand not allowed a proper burial, the custom of disgracing the body of a suicide victim became common. When a person died by suicide, the body would be dragged through the streets; the head may be placed on a pole outside the city gates as a warning to others; and, the body may be thrown outside the city gates for birds or animals to consume, or buried at a crossroads as a token of ignominy. The property and possessions of the deceased, as well as that of the family, would be confiscated. Anyone who attempted suicide would be arrested, publicly shamed and sentenced to death. The seeds of social stigma against attempters, completers and survivors of suicide truly took root during the Middle Ages.

The Renaissance & Reformation

The Renaissance, which roughly lasted from the 14th to 16th centuries, saw a reawakening of intellectualism in the world. Long-held views and beliefs were questioned and challenged. Europeans embraced a new appreciation for life and responsibility. Perhaps the greatest impact of this new movement was on the Catholic Church. Religious leaders began to question Church doctrine, eventually splitting to form their own Protestant denominations. Despite the new emphasis on humanism and freedom in religious doctrine, the deep-rooted stigma associated with suicide survived.

17th - 18th Centuries

The influence of the Renaissance and Reformation on thoughts and attitudes towards suicide cannot be dismissed, however. Suicide became a topic of social interest, vigorously examined in art, theatre, prose and academia during the 1600’s. Perhaps the most palpable reflection of changing views about suicide can be seen in the works of Shakespeare. Several of his most notable characters died by their own hand. Shakespeare reflected the concepts of melancholy (depression), escape from shame or disgrace, and the pain of lost love in his depictions of suicide. He penetrated the cloud of stigma by reminding society that suicide was truly a part of life. The first major defense of suicide in over a thousand years was written in 1608 by the English poet, John Donne, during a time of personal crisis. Donne used the laws of Nature, Reason and God, as well as biblical text, to defend Christians’ rights to choose death. Suicide was once again a topic of philosophical debate. The French philosophers, Montesquieu and Voltaire, both argued in defense of an individual’s right to choose suicide. Also, the Reverend Charles Moore championed the concept of acceptance for suicide in certain circumstances. The main opponents of this “accepting” view of suicide were the Englishmen John McManners and John Wesley, who still supported the most severe punishment for suicidal behavior, regardless of social class.

19th - 20th Centuries

The early 19th century saw the development of a new approach to the study of human society. The development of sociology began with a case study of suicide. In 1897 Emile Durkheim published Le Suicide, the first application of a social analysis. In this writing, Durkheim argued that suicide was not just an individual choice. He suggested that society at large acted as a contributing factor to suicide. Durkheim laid the groundwork for the fields of sociology and suicidology, as well as the foundation for influencing a change in the way society views suicide. One of the reasons suicide is less stigmatized today is the understanding that outside pressures, or societal stressors, can contribute to suicidal behavior. Durkheim introduced a concept that increased awareness about suicide and helped to begin destigmatization. The second major factor to influence change in attitudes about suicide was the development of psychology. Sigmund Freud introduced the world to the concept of psychosis and suggested that mental disorders were truly medical conditions. The notion that mental or emotional distress could be caused by natural, physical factors helped pave the way for changes in civil, criminal and religious laws concerning suicide. Many countries began to abolish laws that made suicide a crime. In 1983, the Roman Catholic Church reversed the canon law that prohibited proper funeral rites and burial in church cemeteries for those who had died by their own hand. All of these developments have been instrumental in shifting attitudes about suicide in modern society.

Present

In 1996, the Suicide Prevention Advocacy Network began a grassroots effort to educate our political leaders about the reality of suicide. A national conference was held in 1998, which brought together a variety stakeholders to discuss targets for a national campaign to reduce the incidence of suicide in the United States. The next year, Dr. David Satcher, the Surgeon General of the United States, released a Call to Action to Prevent Suicide, declaring suicide a national public health issue. Two years later, the Department of Health & Human Services published the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention: Goals and Objectives for Action, which challenged states to take notice and provided a blueprint for them to act. Today, many organizations across the country are working together to set the former Surgeon General’s plan into action. President Bush has even released a report from the New Freedom Commission on Mental Health, entitled, Achieving the Promise: Transforming Mental Health Care in America. This document supports the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention. Louisiana has joined the cause with the LA Youth Suicide Prevention Task Force, the S.T.A.R. Plan for youth suicide prevention, gatekeeper suicide education training and community summits for suicide awareness. The result of action can already be seen. Before the year 2000, the United States experienced one suicide every 17 minutes. National statistics for the year 2000 added a minute to that deadly clock - now the U.S. loses one citizen to suicide every 18 minutes. Progress is counted in every life saved. Education and awareness are the best keys to continue the important job of reducing the impact of suicide in our society. Suicide is not just a mental health problem - it is truly a concern for the entire community.
Posted 7/24/12 , edited 7/24/12
Suicide, is okay! If you think that you have scape and got a guilt free doing it much like a free pass
Most people if not in general views it as an act of cowardliness and self lose hope of one's self and in life

Individual on this state suggest to one's self that it is the right thing to do for great mental and emotional pressure or stress is blinding their thoughts the ability to think sane and rational. For that reason, when someone is trying to commit suicide authorities view the victim as needing psychological and emotional help.

On the religious side and social side, it is entirely prohibited and not encourage.
Nobody has the right to kill someone regardless of their mistake or crime that is why murder or any killing is a crime.
Moreover, Other countries do not even accept death sentence or death penalty as the right equivalent punishment for a criminal because they believe that you can not solve and do justice for someone that have been proven guilty of murder or other crimes by killing them.

Irregardless, if a suicide victim's goes to hell or not. He or she has a moral obligation even when his death. People that know him or her still try to explained and rationalize his or her undertakings to come up with a result like that suicide. Worst part is on the family, love one's and friends of the victim they will feel guilty and be scrutinize by themselves and the society.

Seppukualso known as harakiri. A part of the samurai bushido honor code, seppuku was either used voluntarily by samurai to die with honor rather than fall into the hands of their enemies (and likely suffer torture), or as a form of capital punishment for samurai who had committed serious offenses, or performed for other reasons that had brought shame to them.

Seppuku on the other hand is completely different compare to suicide. This is having an objective to die in honor amidst of shame. Which suicide do not and will never have.



In Singapore, if you commit suicide makes sure you will do it. For if you not and you created a public disturbance you'll be facing some legal charges and fine on your behalf
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Posted 7/25/12
People who do it are weak and sad.
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Posted 8/8/12
I wouldn't care if suicide was a sin or not.

In high school there was this girl who committed suicide. My classmates thought she was tough to do that because they couldn't imagine hang themselves in their closet.

My next door neighbor shot himself in the head around Christmas. Our neighbor worked for the church so my family knew him somewhat. My family felt bad they didn't talk to him more or invite him for Christmas.. because he lived alone.

I have thought of suicide and came close to it once. But I heard my family coming back home, so I stopped myself. I felt bad as I saw my family walk in through the door happy and kissing each other. I realized I don't want to put my family through that.
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Posted 8/23/12
Suicide is not a proper way for getting out of your problems.
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