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Photographer's Union
1953 cr points
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21 / F / world
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Posted 7/26/08

edsamac wrote:

I personally find matte better for B&W, simply because it emphasizes the texture of the high contrast of B&W film, and it also gives it an "old-school" photographic look.

Since you said you're going to be using B&W film, remember that B&W is best for defining contrasts, so they work best when taking pictures that have "texture" and "depth". For portraits, utilizing props, such as a veil with a design, or similar implements can help produce contrast between the subject and the background. It's for this reason that old people are also excellent subjects for B&W photography. Lifestyle photographs are hard to take using B&W, and are usually limited to urban photography due to the good use of building and cement textures. Keep that in mind when composing your shots. Fashion might be hard to pull off with B&W, since much of the expression is seen in the vibrant colors of the clothing. Fashion photography with B&W film might work best if the models are wearing clothing with patterned designs, or other implements that can help showcase contrast between dress and model.

Just some tips to help you with your work. I said that I personally prefer matte for B&W, but I guess it would be nice to recommend glossy prints for your fashion B&W shots, so that the glossiness can add an extra level of expression to the photo, since it lacks the color that would otherwise provide this.



hmmm, now this puts me in an awkward position knowing that my theme will be of balloons and lifestyles. but thank you for you tips, i will take it into consideration

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27 / M / Japan
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Posted 7/26/08 , edited 7/26/08

FoWarD_it wrote:

hmmm, now this puts me in an awkward position knowing that my theme will be of balloons and lifestyles. but thank you for you tips, i will take it into consideration



Of course, it's never a steadfast rule. All I said were just suggestions. I'm pretty sure you can pull something off, despite the subject you're taking. Good luck.


chinky_sonny wrote:

^ you are right i do not have a studio...it is more like making a quick set up from nothing and ... ta da ...a studio. I own a SB 15 and SB600 and a couple of generics taken from the junk (for back up use). The studio thing will be used for practice and control on light and see if i can come up with a masterpiece and maybe get some great photos from the family reunion. For the strobes? I will try to work after sundown using strobes and play with colors. Pocket wizard? Yeah I think it will be good for me. I will check it out. And I will choose the umbrella over the soft box but there are kinds? (reflecting light only, translucent type..)


For the umbrella, most umbrella stands out in the market come with a silver reflector attachment (it fits on top of the translucent umbrella), so you don't have to worry about purchasing two different types of umbrellas. I, personally, find the translucent umbrella more useful, while having a silver reflector board near the subject for bounce flash good for portraits. If you don't want to spend extra on reflector boards, a piece of styrofoam board will work perfectly fine.
1953 cr points
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21 / F / world
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Posted 7/26/08
eek, sorry, i've recently checked out your deviantart page...which is great btw. i was wondering if you could help me with techniques as well for your long exposures similar to "glow" because my teacher explained very vaguely and i understand with the cable and the moving light, but i just don't get how to add it all up
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Posted 7/26/08
I'm learning a photography in school as a module... they usually let us a canon G6 powershot... but if you're fast, u can rent out a canon 400D.... that camera freaking whoops ass!!!
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27 / M / Japan
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Posted 7/27/08 , edited 7/27/08

FoWarD_it wrote:

eek, sorry, i've recently checked out your deviantart page...which is great btw. i was wondering if you could help me with techniques as well for your long exposures similar to "glow" because my teacher explained very vaguely and i understand with the cable and the moving light, but i just don't get how to add it all up


That picture, "glow", is an example of long exposure, and requires you place your camera in a shutter mode known as BULB. In Bulb mode, the shutter will be open so long as you keep your finger depressed on the shutter release button. This is all fine and dandy, but it will only be useful if you do this technique with your camera mounted on a tripod; otherwise, you'll end up blurring the image due to hand shake.

You can do what I did in this shot by setting up a counter-flash behind the subject, to light him up against a background, which in this case was a wall. This was useful since it gave the subject a glowing effect, and helped set contrast between him and the blue light. Without the counter-flash, the subject's face might have turned out to be blue, due to the predominance of the blue glow of the glow sticks.

To set up a counter-flash, you'll need a remote flash system that just fires a flash independent of your camera. I used an SB-800 fired wirelessly from a D70s in commander mode. If your camera doesn't support wireless flash systems, then you'll need a PC link cable to connect the camera to an off-camera flash to be fired from a distance.

But you don't really need to use any counter-flashes for most purposes. To get an effect like "glow", all you need to know is how to use the BULB mode.


melforce123 wrote:

I'm learning a photography in school as a module... they usually let us a canon G6 powershot... but if you're fast, u can rent out a canon 400D.... that camera freaking whoops ass!!!


I wouldn't call the 400D "whoop ass", but it will most certainly blow any typical point and shoot out of the water. It's successor, the 450D, has minor updates, which makes the 400D still a considerable buy to those on a budget. If you want good features on a solid SLR body, try go for the more pricey 40D.
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19 / F / My body lives in...
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Posted 7/27/08
Filters are expensive? Do we really need the filters? How much will you spend to complete a set specially if you have different lens mount sizes? Practically i use a UV just to protect my lens and the polarizer to remove some glare.
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27 / M / Japan
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Posted 7/27/08

chinky_sonny wrote:

Filters are expensive? Do we really need the filters? How much will you spend to complete a set specially if you have different lens mount sizes? Practically i use a UV just to protect my lens and the polarizer to remove some glare.


Some schools of thought will tell you that filters aren't necessary. If anything, UV filters are good for protecting not just the front element, but also your eyes. However, the front element of most good lenses were designed to be exposed, anyway, so adding another piece of glass in front of the lens is just counter intuitive. If you want protection for your lens, placing the hood can do just that. Just make sure you clean the front element of your lens regularly if you decide to skimp on placing a UV filter on your lens.

Polarizing lenses and, more especially, GND/ND filters are more practical since they serve a specific purpose. They're good to have lying around, but aren't necessary.

If you prefer a little "warmth" in your pictures, some people recommend "skylight" filters ~ but again, adding an additional layer of glass that wasn't really intended to be there is counterintuitive, and is simply introducing more chances of chromatic aberration or glare to your shots.

If you really DO need your filters, and you have lenses of different front element diameter, then purchasing a step up converter (i.e. 50 - 77mm converter) is useful in saving up on the number of filters needed for each lens. With a converter, you can use a 77mm filter, for example, on a 50mm diameter lens. Good way to save up on purchasing extra filters.
1953 cr points
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21 / F / world
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Posted 8/14/08
omg. please help. i think i'm going to hyperventilate soon.
i created a masterpiece in my opinion, at least my masterpiece.
took a day perfecting it for my final presentation
and then today afternoon i saw a brown spot in the middle of the picture.
i freaked out and i was like, can i fix this by spotting?
irony. it turned out i didn't put it in the fixer well enough
it's a fiber paper, is there any way i could repair the damage like returning it to the fixer?
1542 cr points
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Posted 8/19/08 , edited 10/6/08


$8,000 = quite expensive



$1,300



$2,700
264 cr points
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23 / M / london babyyy
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Posted 10/6/08
i kinda am a on and off photography guy..

i enjoyyy all that darkroom stuff. processing pictrues and all

yeahh but i havent done that for like 6 months so yeahhhh..
aww i miss it =(
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19 / F / My body lives in...
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Posted 12/1/08 , edited 1/4/09
Nikon has 24.5MP D3x digital SLR






http://www.readmetro.com/show/en/Philadelphia/20081204/1/17/


the shot that won it all using Canon Powershot SD500 and $20 plastic tripod .....with 55,000 contestants


Posted 6/1/11
I currently shoot with a Minolta X-700, but I got it as a beginner and now that I'm more accustomed with film, I want to upgrade to a Canon AE-1. And possibly get my hands on a Nikon D300 so I can do a 365.
Posted 2/15/12
It's time to resurrect this thread.


I'm running 2 Canons, 5D MKII and a 60D for Video ( does the same thing video wise that the 7D does minus the overheating )

Lenses
- Sigma 10mm f/2.8 EX DC HSM Fisheye
- Canon 50mm f/1.4
- Rokinon 35mm f/1.4 Wide-Angle US UMC Aspherical Lens
- Canon 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 Zoom Kit Lens

Equipment:
- VF PRIME ( just as good as a zacuto z-finder )
- Manfrotto 561BHDV-1 Monopod + Fluid Head
- Manfrotto 190XDB Tripod
- Official Battery Grips for both
- Glidecam 2000 Pro
- Rode Microphones NTG-2 Short Shotgun Mic
- H4N Zoom
- Shape Paparazzi I bracket
- 7" Liliput External LCD Field Monitor

Eventually I'll get a shoulder rig... thats enough for now
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23 / M
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Posted 8/31/12
Hello new user here, but I am interested in photography.
I have Canon 7D + 30
Lenses
Canon 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L
Canon 50 f1.4 USM
Canon 70-200 f4 L IS USM
Canon 24-70 f4 L
Canon 15mm 2.8 fisheye
Canon 18-135 IS kit

I take a range of shots, recently done my first wedding. Went brilliantly, I'm a member of photography specific forums. Quite surprised to find this thread on here
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