First  Prev  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  Next  Last
Aspergers Syndrome
64685 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
38 / F / Under the kudzu
Offline
Posted 6/10/08
I'm not claiming to be an expert here, but I have a TON of experience in this subject. My educational background is in Psychology and Occupational Therapy, but neither of those fields really prepared me for my daily life in Aspie-land. My husband and son are both diagnosed Aspies, and my mother-in-law just moved in with us last year, (we are in the process of having her diagnosed--she may even be classified as High-functioning autistic, as she's so bad off). So, considering I live with 3 generations of Aspies and regularly see an autism specialist for help in dealing with them, I think I have a pretty good feel for this disorder. And it IS that...it's NOT a mental illness or a disease.

There is so much misinformation out there, and people uneducated about the subject like to put out their 2 cents. That's fine--free country--but it's the internet, and you have to take what people say with a grain of salt (for all you literal Aspies out there, that means don't entirely trust everything people say...lol). Even journalists that write about the subject make mistakes--I see it ALL the time.

It's one thing to know an Aspie in school, or to read a general run-down of what the disorder is. It's another thing entirely to be affected by the disorder directly. Some of the REAL problems adult Aspies face are:

1) finding and keeping jobs (it's a lot of work for an Aspie to deal with people on a daily basis)
2) paying bills on time, or at all (bills get piled on bills and forgotten under piles of other things and many have never even been taught how to balance a checkbook, or about the importance of credit)
3) showing emotion to significant others (she's in for a real surprise when her Aspie'd rather chat on his obsession-related forum than attend the birth of their child)
4) time management
5) taking medications, especially if it's not a routine prescription
6) common sense (spraying the baby's dirty bottom with windex to clean it, or not knowing that you should have a shower curtain)
7) initiation of ANYTHING (that means being able to start something--get a better job, go to college, fix the garage door that's been hanging on its hinge for 8 months)

These are just a few--I could go on and on. These are very important skills that we need to live a successful and functional life. Adult Aspies are often overlooked in this, because they are JUST functional enough, JUST normal enough. Too often, Aspies are just masking their symptoms because they're smart enough to have learned how. Anyone who says that Asperger's is not a problem, you've never lived in the house of an Aspie--just go look at the stats for marriage success in adult Aspies. The rates of depression. Etc. Etc. Yes, there are some wonderful abilities that many Aspies access. But for an adult, having a detailed knowledge about the Titanic, Bears football, or even Naruto will not pay your bills, it will not give you common sense for living skills, it will not make you a good husband/father, and it will not advance your career. Many Aspies end up wallowing in extreme debt, working low-paying retail jobs, living in their parents' basement or in a trashed apartment, when they could be working in professional careers and writing their PhD's. And mostly because ignorant teachers, government agencies and fooled friends think that Asperger's is "not that big a deal".

This is a real picture of real Aspies.

Just keep in mind that the autism spectrum is called a "spectrum" for a very good reason. The range of functionality is so broad, and it's been said, "If you've seen one Aspie, you've seen one Aspie." That's one reason it's so hard to get an accurate dx. One Aspie's strength (my husband has a 180 Comprehension IQ) is another's weakness (many Aspies, like my son, have difficulty with or deficiency in comprehension).

Okay, stepping off my soap box now. Sorry, Aspies, for all the metaphors in this post. I'm Neuro-Typical (NT) (although I do have a lot of Aspie traits, myself), so I speak in euphemisms.

Mainly just wanted people to be aware that there's more to this disorder than the cold clinical description of symptoms. Those symptoms manifest themselves in potentially devastating ways to an adult. Very little research has been done so far (next to NONE in small population of elderly autistics), so this is something that the next generation--YOU--will be taking on.





Posted 6/10/08
sounds like me
64685 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
38 / F / Under the kudzu
Offline
Posted 6/10/08
Let me just add a quick amendment to my previous post...

The problems I described are based on Aspies of an older generation. I'm talking about a time when they still slapped a kid's wrist for not holding their pencil properly. When people of different colors were still drinking out of separate water fountains. And later (in my generation), when AIDS, the Cold War, and the Lebanon Beirut Crisis were hot news on every one of our six tv channels.

Aspies today have MUCH better prognosis, largely for the recognition of the disorder, the resources available (although they're costly, lemme tell ya!), and the general public awareness. I think younger Aspies are in a much better position than their older counterparts. Just the fact that we have an Aspie forum on crunchyroll, for goodness sakes!!! That's awesome.

So, if you're a diagnosed Aspie, that's GREAT! You are SOOOO lucky to have been born in this time. Don't despair and think you have a terrible life ahead of you. You'll have to work a little harder than most people to achieve positive results in life. There are certain fields that are much better suited to your unique personality traits. But that's okay, too, cause this world is increasingly being geared toward people with your abilities.

Ah, the wonderful internet!!! :)

26425 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
22 / F / Virginia
Offline
Posted 6/10/08 , edited 6/10/08
My cousin has it.His little obsessive behavior is video games.He walks around the house receiting instructions from the manuels.He also waves his arms up and down when he walks.
5352 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
26 / M
Offline
Posted 6/10/08
assburgers
724 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
33
Offline
Posted 6/10/08
I have it. I never knew there were so many people who faked, it, and I never got involved with any communities of people who have it. All I know is, it was professionally diagnosed when I was about 14. When I was in elementary school, for some reason I was put in some classes with the severely autistic kids, and this kind of gave me my first impressions on what autism was. So when I was diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome, I was really reluctant to tell anyone, and now that there's a stigma that anyone who claims to have it is an attention whore, I'm even more reluctant to tell anyone, except to specify that I am not "self-diagnosed," in case I let it slip some time in the future and am subject to such allegations. Offline, I never admit it to anyone unless I really have to or feel I can trust them.

3802 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / F / Iowa
Offline
Posted 6/10/08 , edited 6/10/08
Mmm nope never heard of that until now. I dont want anyone commenting back to me to call me pathetic names or think im some overly religious person because its not that im just stating my opinion, experiences, and beliefs.

Any serious illness, disorder or disease must be a big burden to carry everyday so props for keeping your head up high man. I do believe in god and i am a walking miracle. I dont believe in luck. I swallowed a needle when i was in 6th grade and it did nothing to me. No poking and no internal bleeding. Im blessed to be alive. I have also fell on my chin twice really hard and my jaw was not dislocated and im alright. My jaw is a little weak, but to not have those falls affect my jaw seriously is really something.

I respect the people that keep living on when they have an incurable illness, disorder or disease effecting their lives.
5159 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
26 / M / England, Berkshire.
Offline
Posted 6/15/08 , edited 6/15/08

TumbleweedCrossing wrote:
It's one thing to know an Aspie in school, or to read a general run-down of what the disorder is. It's another thing entirely to be affected by the disorder directly. Some of the REAL problems adult Aspies face are:

1) finding and keeping jobs (it's a lot of work for an Aspie to deal with people on a daily basis)
2) paying bills on time, or at all (bills get piled on bills and forgotten under piles of other things and many have never even been taught how to balance a checkbook, or about the importance of credit)
3) showing emotion to significant others (she's in for a real surprise when her Aspie'd rather chat on his obsession-related forum than attend the birth of their child)
4) time management
5) taking medications, especially if it's not a routine prescription
6) common sense (spraying the baby's dirty bottom with windex to clean it, or not knowing that you should have a shower curtain)
7) initiation of ANYTHING (that means being able to start something--get a better job, go to college, fix the garage door that's been hanging on its hinge for 8 months)

I don't think thats all true. I myself think thats quite bios.
I haven't ever had problems with debt but time management I could agree on.

Today is today and tomorrow is tomorrow which in sense means its 2 days away.

Basically saying its better to get stuff over and done with in the present than the future providing it doesn't break any of my routines.


hyenas wrote:
I have it. I never knew there were so many people who faked, it, and I never got involved with any communities of people who have it. All I know is, it was professionally diagnosed when I was about 14. When I was in elementary school, for some reason I was put in some classes with the severely autistic kids, and this kind of gave me my first impressions on what autism was. So when I was diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome, I was really reluctant to tell anyone, and now that there's a stigma that anyone who claims to have it is an attention whore, I'm even more reluctant to tell anyone, except to specify that I am not "self-diagnosed," in case I let it slip some time in the future and am subject to such allegations. Offline, I never admit it to anyone unless I really have to or feel I can trust them.

I agree with that all as its happened to me too, except I was diagnosed before I started school (diagnosed by tests & doctors). It was a reason for not being accepted in my local school and discrimination on my life until I reached high school.


FadingWhisper wrote:
Mmm nope never heard of that until now.

*snippy*

I respect the people that keep living on when they have an incurable illness, disorder or disease effecting their lives.

I don't think you have heard it well if what your saying in your last message.
True Aspergers Syndrome is something not everyone is aware of and its the reason for the uncomfortable feeling of telling the truth about having it; discrimination and being bullied isn't nice.

Aspergers Syndrome is not a disease; I never got it, it doesn't spread and curing something such as this really doesn't seem like a cure to our eyes unless the uneasiness is that thing that has gotten to you.

I was born with it, I don't see anything really wrong with me. I see the world odd, I see people thinking I'm odd and not knowing why. I had a group organised by doctors grouping other Aspies together and thats when I noticed (too bad I lost contact with all the Aspies from the group).

---------
As for communities.
http://www.WrongPlanet.com/

Thats an Aspie community site which I found recently but I doubt its full of Aspies, some may be mis-diagnosed or people just talking about the people who do have it.


I'm not sure but I think for symptoms wise they try to categorise us into two groups. (you might not always fit into a group). One group shows one set of features/faults that are different to the other.
I can't remember what they call the groups so I'll have to look it up.
64685 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
38 / F / Under the kudzu
Offline
Posted 6/21/08 , edited 6/21/08


Dark Onister wrote:

I don't think thats all true. I myself think thats quite bios.
I haven't ever had problems with debt but time management I could agree on.



I think you meant "biased"... lol And yes, I think I made it quite clear that I'm biased. I live with THREE Aspies, after all. I'd say I have every right to be biased. :)

You have to remember that not every Aspie has the same problems. I made that quite clear, as well. Just because YOU don't have problems managing your bills doesn't mean that it's not true for others. We have several Aspie friends and at least 75% of them have difficulty paying bills for the SAME reason. Time management is one of the many reasons they HAVE problems paying their bills on time. Another reason is they often don't know how to budget and they spend way too much money on their special interest. That subject deserves (and has received in many books about adult Aspies) a whole chapter in itself.

No offense, but you're only 18. You haven't had time to develop debt. Give it about 10 years. When you have a mortgage, 2 car payments, 2 student loans, 4 credit cards and 5 utility bills, then it might be a little different for you. A lot of Aspies can't organize it all. Some CAN...and you may be one of those lucky ones. But not everyone is as lucky as you.

Don't mean to be causing offense. Just stating the facts. :)



Posted 6/21/08
um... I'm rpetty sure I don't have Aspergers Syndroms, but I do know that I have ADD (and possibility of ADHD...)
Posted 6/21/08
i know i have ADD for sure...not so sure about autism though o0 (i take pills for the ADD)
1929 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / F / Australia
Offline
Posted 6/22/08 , edited 6/22/08
My friend's twin has it. He's in my class and acts generally normal. Only the people who went to primary school with him know that he has Aspergers because we were all told. My little brother is severely Autistic, very smart kid but doesn't know how to express it.
Posted 6/23/08
i have aspergers and i was diagnosed when i was 15 before then they all thought i had (ADHD like wtf i was not hyper at all!!), i am very very intelligent when it comes to computers. i Completely FAIL AT ENGLISH and i fail at all those other lame subjects, i am now age 17, almost 18. From my personal experience Try to feel as comfortable as possible. i program Java,and some web based apps, i have no job. People on the internet can call me almost like a NEET. Because i do get out of my house just only 2 days a week. From personal experience i find people who don't have it are Really REALLY Stupid at computers or electronics, EXAMPLE: yesterday i was at my cousins in Vancouver and they had a German Exchange Student of course he had been using the same tv for about 3 months but he could not figure out when i was their to push The Stupid Arrow button to exit a menu! (rofl). then he ask: (How do i get to the guide?) i said: (Push this HUGE BUTTON THAT SAYS GUIDE and navigate with the Arrows.)

PS: My brother does not have aspergers but he is a Straight A STUDENT in 2 year college and he is a Moron in Computers / he does not know how to turn off firewall or goto (CMD PROMPT in windows)
733 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Offline
Posted 6/23/08
WTF I think I have it. But nobody notices it cause I rarely talk.
Posted 6/23/08
nah, i doubt i know anyone like this. but it'd be great if i could like really understand this kind of thing well.
would help loads when it comes to handling people.
First  Prev  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.