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is the american or british accent better?
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30 / cool britania
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Posted 3/27/08
i remember i said to an american one time pass me the book and the way i pronounce book is like when you read the word buk or bok. so he didnt understand until i said booooook.
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26 / M / UK
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Posted 3/27/08

Terminator_kun wrote:

the british has these accents:

Londoner
Scottish
Cockney
Manchester accent
Kettering


You missed out Essex accent - thats the one I have . Cockney's the best though.
Posted 3/27/08
i dunno y i have a thing for the newcastle accent i hate american acc it drives me mad
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24 / F / Shinigami Realm [...
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Posted 3/27/08
it's American English.... kind of like Canadian English, except better. (i like Canada actually XD) England's English is cool though. the accents are pretty hott. Australian English is pretty nice too.
Posted 3/27/08

mouse20 wrote:

all americans have strong accents. british people also have accents but not like the americans.


are you kidding?

to be honest to me at least... americans dont have accents.
Its just bland english.

what I find funny is when other cultures w/ accents practice their singing and they
get really good that they lose their accent when they sing. To me it sounds american.
sorry if u dont agree, but thats my take on it
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28 / F / Georgia, United S...
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Posted 3/27/08
hard to say all americans have different dialects depending on where they live or upbringing. haha british might be like that too, lol
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M / earth
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Posted 3/27/08
depends on standards and the culture
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28 / F / U.S. of A.
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Posted 3/27/08
there are so many accents in the U.S. you have southern, Long Island (NY) to name a few..and then you have people who talk gangsta. LOL
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30 / F / LI, NY
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Posted 3/27/08

AHTL wrote:

I tend to use British words more often than American ones. Though there are some I can't remember the difference on.


Like, what's American and British between:

Shop/Store
Candy/[What was the other word again...? >_<]



A shop and a store are the same thing. Both versions of English use them.

As for the candy...bon bon? Chocolates? Sweets? Candy and sweets are the same, bon bons and chocolates are types of candies.

The answer to your issue: learn what a synonym is. It's not that confusing.


thefinalword wrote:


mouse20 wrote:

all americans have strong accents. british people also have accents but not like the americans.


are you kidding?

to be honest to me at least... americans dont have accents.
Its just bland english.

what I find funny is when other cultures w/ accents practice their singing and they
get really good that they lose their accent when they sing. To me it sounds american.
sorry if u dont agree, but thats my take on it


Americans have multiple accents, depending on the religion and the individual.
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22 / M
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Posted 3/27/08
even though british has a bad accent i'd rather choose them instead of rednecks accents
Posted 3/27/08

Terminator_kun wrote:

the british has these accents:

Londoner
Scottish
Cockney
Manchester accent
Kettering


I hope you're not British cos that is definitely not the whole list of British accents. ^^
There are heaps more.


AHTL wrote:

I tend to use British words more often than American ones. Though there are some I can't remember the difference on.


Like, what's American and British between:

Shop/Store
Candy/[What was the other word again...? >_<]



I think British people tend to use "shop" more for smaller places ie corner shops and "store" for larger ones. If you had to say one, "store" is generally more American.
I have never used the word "candy" before. It's such an American term ^^ British people just say sweets.

There's a lot of British/American differences. Can't think of any just now but pavement/sidewalk is one.

Oh and I prefer some American and some British accents. It really depends how strong they are.
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AHTL 
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Posted 3/27/08

CerridwenStorms wrote:
A shop and a store are the same thing. Both versions of English use them.

As for the candy...bon bon? Chocolates? Sweets? Candy and sweets are the same, bon bons and chocolates are types of candies.

The answer to your issue: learn what a synonym is. It's not that confusing.


I know that. The issue at hand is not what they mean. You're wrong when you say both versions of English use 'em. I got an British mate who is quite persistent that we use 'British' words, so he'll get pissed off if we for instance say: [If this is correct] See you later, going to the store to get buy some candy.


He would then agree that it's 'shop' and 'sweets', not the other part.

Besides, saying that both versions of English use 'em is only partially correct.

Yes you can use 'em in both versions of English, but that doesn't make it regionally correct to use both.

There is a difference to words, on what is British and what is American. Even my English teaching books said that. [Pity I sold 'em off]
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30 / F / LI, NY
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Posted 3/27/08

AHTL wrote:


CerridwenStorms wrote:
A shop and a store are the same thing. Both versions of English use them.

As for the candy...bon bon? Chocolates? Sweets? Candy and sweets are the same, bon bons and chocolates are types of candies.

The answer to your issue: learn what a synonym is. It's not that confusing.


I know that. The issue at hand is not what they mean. You're wrong when you say both versions of English use 'em. I got an British mate who is quite persistent that we use 'British' words, so he'll get pissed off if we for instance say: [If this is correct] See you later, going to the store to get buy some candy.


He would then agree that it's 'shop' and 'sweets', not the other part.

Besides, saying that both versions of English use 'em is only partially correct.

Yes you can use 'em in both versions of English, but that doesn't make it regionally correct to use both.

There is a difference to words, on what is British and what is American. Even my English teaching books said that. [Pity I sold 'em off]


It depends on the instance in which it's used. I'll give you the candy (old movies mix that up for me; all Hollywood productions with English actors--it throws you off) bit, but I definitely have heard Brits use "store" in the context of shopping.
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AHTL 
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27 / Norway
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Posted 3/27/08

CerridwenStorms wrote:

It depends on the instance in which it's used. I'll give you the candy (old movies mix that up for me; all Hollywood productions with English actors--it throws you off) bit, but I definitely have heard Brits use "store" in the context of shopping.


Guess 'store' is kind of universal then, eh?

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26 / USA
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Posted 3/27/08
British accents.
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