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Posted 3/15/09

jirvildavid wrote:

that's true, but, isn't he a cruel lord cuz I've heard that he kills anyone who gets in his way, even women and children. I even heard that he also kills the enemy's cattles


Sorry to dissapoint you, but all warlords did that. Thats how war was in Japan, you dindt kill just your enemy, but his entire familly to. But they made some exceptions if the familly members swore allegiance but that rarely hapened. And if i remember right, most japanesse people are buddist's and they dont eat meat, so i doubt they had cattle. Offcourse shinto was also widelly practiced(logically, since it is the native relligion) and in shinto you can eat meat, as long as you show gratitude for the food you receive.
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Posted 3/15/09

Ice_Blue_Eyes wrote:

Many westerners also feel that Samurai means "Soldier" but it more properly translates to Vassal or Retainer. A close servant to a Daimyo (lord of a fife; Kind of like a "King" in the Frankish dark ages. The Shogun, military dictator of all Japan would be akin to a "High King" or "King of Kings" in the Frankish dark ages before "King" meant ruling all of a country due to crowns being integrated and "Common Kings" being given titles of peerage; Duke(one of relation to the monarchy), Earl, Count, Viscount, Barron, etc.) The samurai were a small percentage of the army which was made up of more than 90% foot soldiers or "Ashigaru" of which the Samurai commanded and fought alongside.

The samurai mainly prosed as cavalry. A samurai was not originally first noted for the sword at all, but rather the bow ("Yumi") because they first shot the bow until they were in close distance in which they used the Spear if they had one. When the spear was broken or became cumbersome, they threw it aside or at the enemy and drew their sword. When the sword was broken (common place in war) or disarmed, they fought using a technique called Jujutsu which employs grappling, throws, joint locks, and lethal strikes to vital points.

Later, in the Edo-jidai (The gradual decline of the Samurai) when the Shogunate had retained peace through the land and samurai were reduced to politicians and grew weak. Ronin (lit "Men of the Waves") or masterless swordsman who had lost the title of Samurai wandered the land causing all sorts of disorder. These ronin were more akin to the samurai of days of yore, rowdy and tough often making umbrellas or acting as bodyguards or joining gangs of Yakuza for money.

This was the age where Bushido was born and Samurai were then known by the Daisho (Twin swords; Katana and Wakizashi) and armor was no longer employed since there were no open wars.

This is the age, the spirit of the samurai truly fell.


Sorry to say this but the kanji for samurai 侍 means serve or attend upon so samurai litarally means to serve. And yes, the vast majority of the army was formed by common foot soldiers, peasents, but after Toyotomi Hideyoshi became kanpaku only samurai could fight in wars or carry weapons, ironicall since he was the son of a peasent
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Posted 3/16/09

Costin wrote:

Sorry to say this but the kanji for samurai 侍 means serve or attend upon so samurai litarally means to serve. And yes, the vast majority of the army was formed by common foot soldiers, peasents, but after Toyotomi Hideyoshi became kanpaku only samurai could fight in wars or carry weapons, ironicall since he was the son of a peasent


That is true. I was relating to battlefield context though.
I'll correct myself: Samurai were primarily vassals of daimyo. Secondly they functioned as officers and cavalry units.
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Posted 3/17/09

Ice_Blue_Eyes wrote:


Costin wrote:

Sorry to say this but the kanji for samurai 侍 means serve or attend upon so samurai litarally means to serve. And yes, the vast majority of the army was formed by common foot soldiers, peasents, but after Toyotomi Hideyoshi became kanpaku only samurai could fight in wars or carry weapons, ironicall since he was the son of a peasent


That is true. I was relating to battlefield context though.
I'll correct myself: Samurai were primarily vassals of daimyo. Secondly they functioned as officers and cavalry units.


Yes thats true
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