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Post Reply Music Class 1A
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aceeasi Londra
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Posted 3/28/08 , edited 12/16/08


LOVE ACADEMY -------> MUSIC CLASS

Here we have our music teachers:

gracee21
and
boo_shoe2000





STUDENTS:

1. iansan
2. fiby_23
3. moon_server6000
4. clynefaction12
5. CrescentAngel360
6. patsyrey
7. myjilt
8. jonsss
9. fueledbyangela
10.craaazy_comicz
11.ivern12
12.almirah11
13.JigokuTsuushin
14.nisah282
15.kokoro192
16.Mezzeffah
17.Ryoma90
18.Yoshi36
19.
20.


*learn many things about Music. Talk about Rock, Balland, RnB, Mellow, Jazz, and a lot more about music!
Posted 4/3/08
hello everyone!
i am gracee21 your music professor here in love academy...


for my students:

-you may ask any questions concerning about music and music instruments
-if you want to know how to play a specific instrument, please post it here so i may know and i can teach you for the best of my knowledge
-if you have any suggestions or ideas that could help our class' improvement, feel free to voice it out here


*i will give my best to answer your questions correctly and give you some important informations regarding your question.*

here are some MUSIC INSTRUMENTS...

~guitar~

Keyboard instrument
~piano~

Bowed Strings
~violen~

Percussion instruments
~drums~

Woodwind
~bassoon~
~clarinet~
~flute~
~oboe~

Brass instruments
~frenchhorn~
~saxophone~
~trombone~
~trumpet~
~tuba~
Posted 4/4/08
hehe hello i like 2 be ur student ^^

Deputy Headmistress
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aceeasi Londra
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Posted 4/4/08

moon_server6000 wrote:

hehe hello i like 2 be ur student ^^



u;re now a student in the Love Academy Music Class...^__^
Posted 4/4/08

alexya4u wrote:
u;re now a student in the Love Academy Music Class...^__^

ahehe tnxxxxxxxxx ^^
Posted 4/4/08
WELCOME TO LOVE ACADEMY's MUSIC CLASS :)

We are now open for nomination for


CLASS OFFICER 2008


~POSITIONS~

President ~
Vice~President~
Secretary~
Treasurer~
Auditor~
Sgt. At Arms~*2
MUSE~
Prince Charming~


*in order for us to have our class money, each of us should donate...it's up to you my students on how much money you want to donate for our class If we will be able to gather a high amount, we will decide on what we are going to buy for it. Is it a music instrument, an album, music book or etc., that is useful for us here in our class....everybody can nominate a thing. I will only chose 3 things that are having the most recommendation from you to let you vote in!

The Treasurer and Auditor should understand their positions' job. The Secretary will have to do a recap every after the end of the day about the lessons we had~if there is!

If anything is going wrong in our class or somebody is having a fight, Sgt. At Arms should do a desciplinary action...

As for the Muse & Prince Charming, they should post a real picture of herself/himself so everybody can decide 100% correctly in voting ^ ^

The first 3 persons who have the most # of nomination in a specific position will automatically be voted. One who get the highest score will have the desired position ^_^ Please Vote Wisely!


~gracee21~

music professor
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Posted 4/6/08

gracee21 wrote:

WELCOME TO LOVE ACADEMY's MUSIC CLASS :)

We are now open for nomination for


CLASS OFFICER 2008


~POSITIONS~

President ~
Vice~President~
Secretary~
Treasurer~
Auditor~
Sgt. At Arms~*2
MUSE~
Prince Charming~


*in order for us to have our class money, each of us should donate...it's up to you my students on how much money you want to donate for our class If we will be able to gather a high amount, we will decide on what we are going to buy for it. Is it a music instrument, an album, music book or etc., that is useful for us here in our class....everybody can nominate a thing. I will only chose 3 things that are having the most recommendation from you to let you vote in!

The Treasurer and Auditor should understand their positions' job. The Secretary will have to do a recap every after the end of the day about the lessons we had~if there is!

If anything is going wrong in our class or somebody is having a fight, Sgt. At Arms should do a desciplinary action...

As for the Muse & Prince Charming, they should post a real picture of herself/himself so everybody can decide 100% correctly in voting ^ ^

The first 3 persons who have the most # of nomination in a specific position will automatically be voted. One who get the highest score will have the desired position ^_^ Please Vote Wisely!


~gracee21~

music professor


Wow this is rather cool Ma'am...I'm Fiby_23 and i wish to learn to play the piano...coz i'm the only one in the family who is musically-unoriented.. My Sis is a good singer and my bro plays the guitar...so got to do something so i won't be out of place...Anyway the idea of having a club is great...juz hope other students shows up so we can start...
Posted 4/6/08
yeah, we can't start unless we're complete...must think of ways to complete our class Fiby_23
i hope i can help with that

learning piano
The first steps are always the hardest, with the piano as with anything else. Here i offer you general information intended to make those first steps easier and more efficient.

Lesson 1: Laying a Foundation
~preparation
~key names
~fingerings
~grand staff

Lesson 2: Rock Bottom Basics
~note names
~note values

Lesson 3: Know the Lingo
~sharps/flats/naturals
~dynamics
~tempos
~legato/staccato

Lesson 4: Breaking Music's Secret Code
~key signatures
~time signatures

Lesson 5: Hop, Skip and a Jump
~intervals
~major/minor scales
~scale degrees
~solfeggio

Lesson 6: The Layer Cake of Sound
~triads
~primary chords I IV V
~other common chords

Lesson 7: Bending the Rules
~circle of fifths
~non-harmonic tones
~modes

Lesson 8: Mixing it up
~borrowed chords
~modulation

Lesson 9: Reading the Roadmap
~cadences
~form
~exposition/development/recapitulation

Lesson 10: Crashcourse in Counterpoint


Lesson 1:
This lesson will familarize you with the keyboard and teach valuable piano playing technique. Posture and hand position are very important first skills that will, if learned early, help you later on. Always remember to sit with a straight back at the piano. Your arm should extend straight from your elbows to the piano where your hand should rest as if holding an imaginary bubble in your palm. Your fingers should remain curved and relaxed at all times. Before learning the note names, introductory music often gives finger numbers instead of notes. Most books will have a few songs that include hand positions at the top of the song indicating which keys to place your fingers on. The picture below shows "C" position. The fingerings are then 1 through 5 starting with your thumb and ending with your pinky. Before trying to understand a hand position from a book it is helpful to know where middle C is. By looking at a hand position chart you can see exactly which key it is, and this key is often found almost directly under the piano label in the middle of the keyboard.



The next step is understanding the way the keyboard is laid out. Here is a picture of a keyboard with its matching letter names. The names of the notes are A,B,C,D,E,F,G. These notes form what is called an Octave and repeat up and down the keyboard. The keyboard is divided into groups of black and white keys. The groups can be used to remember key names. For instance, the "D" note can be found between the group of 2 black keys. "C" is the white key directly to the left of "D" and the white key to the right of "D" is "E." The black keys will be explained in lesson 3. Practice finding all the "D's" on the keyboard. Locate the lowest "D" and play the note names going up. D,E,F,G,A,B,C, and you should find yourself back at "D." Try to think of clues to help yourself remember which notes are located where. One common device for remembering "D" is to think that "D" is in the "Doghouse" between the two black keys.



Once you've mastered finding notes on the keyboard it's time to start looking at an actual piece of music. As you look at a piece of sheet music you see that there are 2 groups of 5 lines each, connected by a bracket. This is called the Grand Staff . The grand staff is made up of the treble staff and the bass staff . Each staff is marked by their respective clef signs. On each staff you will see the key signature and the time signature, which will be explained in a later lesson. The grand staff is where notes will be placed that correspond to keys on the piano. It's now time to begin learning note names.





Posted 4/6/08
Lesson 2:



In this lesson we will explore how to find note names on the staff and also use the above chart to learn the values of certain notes. This is where you progress from playing by finger numbers to reading actual notes on the page. Both the treble and bass staffs are made up of 5 lines. In between you can see there are 4 spaces. The letter names of notes on the lines follow the pattern E,G,B,D,F. Mnemonic devices such as "Every Good Boy Does Fine," can help you to memorize the letter names of the lines. The four spaces are labeled F,A,C,E. As you can see, the letters spell the word FACE, and are therefore easier to remember. Practice some drills naming random letters of the lines and spaces and then locating those notes on the keyboard. Don't become frustrated if this part of the lesson is difficult. It will take some practice before playing notes on the keyboard becomes automatic.



The next step is to incorporate rhythm into playing. So far you have learned the notes of the piano and where they are written on the staff. Yet there are many different kinds of notes that you need to be familar with. The note value chart given on this page will help you visualize the basic note durations and their names. Rhythms in music are divided into beats, and those beats are divided into measures and time signatures , as you will learn later on. For right now we will deal with playing notes along to a steady beat. The quarter note is the most basic. This note most commonly gets one beat of a group of four beats. There are two eighth notes for every quarter note. When you divide an eighth note in two you get a sixteenth note , etc. Longer than a quarter note is a half note , which equals two quarter notes, in this case 2 beats. The whole note will sound for the entire measure, for four beats in our practice rhythm. There are always 2 half notes for every whole note. You will eventually come across notes that have a dot next to them. This indicates that half of the note's original length is now added to the note. For example, a quarter with a dot now equals one and a half counts. Although this probably sounds confusing right now, it will become easier once we cover time signatures in the later chapters. For now just concentrate on memorizing how many smaller notes equal a larger one. For instance, 2 eighth notes equal 1 quarter note. 2 quarter notes equal a half note, and so on.
Posted 4/6/08
Helpful Terms
Accent ~ Marking above or below note head that indicates note is to be stressed with emphasis.
Accidentals ~ Sharps, flats, or naturals that indicate notes other than those indicated by the key signature.
Arpeggio ~ Chord in which the notes are separated to produce a broken effect.
Asymmetrical Meter ~ Meter in which the beats cannot be divided equally into groups of two or three.
Augmented ~ An interval or chord that is one half step smaller than minor or perfect.
Authentic Cadence ~ Cadence from V to I at the end of a musical phrase.
Bass Staff ~ The lower of the two staves in the grand staff containing low pitches.
Block Chord ~ Chord in which all the notes are played simultaneously.
Borrowed Chord ~ Chord taken from a parallel major or minor key.
Cadence ~ Last two chords in a musical phrase.
Cantus Firmus ~ Main line or phrase composed in voice leading.
Circle of Fifths ~ Pattern of notes used to show key signatures and their relationships in a clock diagram.
Compound Meter ~ Meter in which the beat is a dotted note.
Consonance ~ Sound resulting from an interval or chord that is pleasant or resolved.
Counterpoint ~ Line written against the cantus firmus in voice leading.
Crescendo ~ Dynamics marking that indicates increasing in volume.
Deceptive Cadence ~ Cadence in which the penultimate chord is V and the second chord is anything but the expected tonic.
Decrescendo ~ Dynamics marking that indicates decreasing in volume.
Development ~ Second section in a piece of music written in sonata form or fugue form that develops the themes introduced in the exposition.
Diminished ~ An interval or chord that is one half step smaller than minor or perfect.
Dissonance ~ Sound resulting from an interval or chord that is harsh or unresolved.
Duple Meter ~ Meter in which the beats can be grouped by twos.
Dynamics ~ Expression markings that indicate the loudness or softness of music.
Eighth Note ~ Filled in note with flag that represents a certain duration of a beat indicated by the time signature.
Enharmonic ~ Two intervals that share the same distance but different spellings, ex. aug 2nd, min. 3rd.
Exposition ~ First section of a piece written in sonata form or fugue form that introduces the main themes.
Flat ~ Accidental that indicates that the note that follows it should be lowered one half step.
Grand Staff ~ Both the treble and bass staves linked together by a bracket.
Half Note ~ Hollow note with no flag that represents a certain duration of a beat indicated by the time signature.
Harmonic Interval ~ Interval in which both notes are played simultaneously.
Harmonic Minor Scale ~ Form of minor scale that is the equivalent of the natural minor with a raised 7th scale degree.
Intervals ~ Distance between notes that make steps or skips in music.
Key Signature ~ Marking at the beginning of a measure that indicates which notes will be played most often.
Leading Tone ~ One half step down from the tonic. The 7th scale degree that leads to the tonic.
Legato ~ Expression marking that indicates notes are to be played smooth and connected.
Major Key ~ Key that sounds bright. Found by going up one half step from last sharp or indicated by second to last flat.
Major Scale ~ Scale that follows the pattern of whole and half steps from any two "C's" on the piano.
Measure ~ Distance between two bar lines in a piece of music, also called one bar.
Melodic interval ~ Interval in which the notes are played separately.
Melodic Minor ~ Form of minor scale that is the equivalent of the natural minor with raised 6th and 7th scale degrees ascending, and the natural minor descending.
Minor Key ~ Key that sounds dark. Key name can be found by using the relative minor key of major keys
Modulation ~ The process of changing from one key to a closely related key, those that differ in one accidental.
Natural Minor Scale ~ Scale that follows the pattern of whole and half steps from any two "A's" on the piano.
Non-Harmonic Tone ~ Note played along with a chord that is note a traditional note of the chord
Octave ~ The distance between two keys of the same letter name, also the interval of an 8th.
Picardy Third ~ Major third in the tonic chord in a minor key. Used to produce a resolved major sound at the end of a phrase in a minor key.
Plagal Cadence ~ Cadence from IV to I at the end of a musical phrase.
Quarter Note ~ Filled in note with no flag that represents a certain duration of a beat indicated by the time signature.
Recapitulation ~ Final section in a piece of music written in sonata form or fugue form that repeats the themes presented in the exposition, and returns to the original key if modulation has occurred.
Relative Minor ~ Minor key that shares the same key signature with a major key. Found by going down 3 half steps from the major key name.
Rondo ~ Form in music that has a recurring section, the most common being ABACA and ABACABA.
Root ~ Tonic note of a chord. The lowest note when in root position.
Sharp ~ Accidental that indicates that the note which follows it should be raised one half step.
Simple Meter ~ Meter in which the beat can be divided by two.
Sixteenth Note ~ Filled in note with two flags that represents a certain duration of a beat indicated by the time signature.
Slur ~ Curved line around note heads that indicates those notes are to be played legato.
Species one Counterpoint ~ Form of voice written composition that is note-against-note.
Staccato ~ Dote above or below note head that indicates articulation of the note is short.
Time Signature ~ Symbol at the beginning of both staves that indicates the number and length of beats in a piece of music.
Treble Staff ~ The top staff in the grand staff containing higher pitches than the bass staff.
Triad ~ A chord built in thirds that includes a root, (tonic) third, and fifth.
Triple Meter ~ Meter in which the beats can be grouped by threes.
Whole Note ~ Hollow note with no stem that represents a certain duration of a beat indicated by the time signature.





Posted 4/6/08
that's all for now, tomorrow we will take up lesson3 & 4...

please master lesson1&2

goodluck
Moderator
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30 / F / Italy
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Posted 4/6/08

gracee21 wrote:

yeah, we can't start unless we're complete...must think of ways to complete our class Fiby_23
i hope i can help with that

learning piano
The first steps are always the hardest, with the piano as with anything else. Here i offer you general information intended to make those first steps easier and more efficient.

Lesson 1: Laying a Foundation
~preparation
~key names
~fingerings
~grand staff

Lesson 2: Rock Bottom Basics
~note names
~note values

Lesson 3: Know the Lingo
~sharps/flats/naturals
~dynamics
~tempos
~legato/staccato

Lesson 4: Breaking Music's Secret Code
~key signatures
~time signatures

Lesson 5: Hop, Skip and a Jump
~intervals
~major/minor scales
~scale degrees
~solfeggio

Lesson 6: The Layer Cake of Sound
~triads
~primary chords I IV V
~other common chords

Lesson 7: Bending the Rules
~circle of fifths
~non-harmonic tones
~modes

Lesson 8: Mixing it up
~borrowed chords
~modulation

Lesson 9: Reading the Roadmap
~cadences
~form
~exposition/development/recapitulation

Lesson 10: Crashcourse in Counterpoint


Lesson 1:
This lesson will familarize you with the keyboard and teach valuable piano playing technique. Posture and hand position are very important first skills that will, if learned early, help you later on. Always remember to sit with a straight back at the piano. Your arm should extend straight from your elbows to the piano where your hand should rest as if holding an imaginary bubble in your palm. Your fingers should remain curved and relaxed at all times. Before learning the note names, introductory music often gives finger numbers instead of notes. Most books will have a few songs that include hand positions at the top of the song indicating which keys to place your fingers on. The picture below shows "C" position. The fingerings are then 1 through 5 starting with your thumb and ending with your pinky. Before trying to understand a hand position from a book it is helpful to know where middle C is. By looking at a hand position chart you can see exactly which key it is, and this key is often found almost directly under the piano label in the middle of the keyboard.



The next step is understanding the way the keyboard is laid out. Here is a picture of a keyboard with its matching letter names. The names of the notes are A,B,C,D,E,F,G. These notes form what is called an Octave and repeat up and down the keyboard. The keyboard is divided into groups of black and white keys. The groups can be used to remember key names. For instance, the "D" note can be found between the group of 2 black keys. "C" is the white key directly to the left of "D" and the white key to the right of "D" is "E." The black keys will be explained in lesson 3. Practice finding all the "D's" on the keyboard. Locate the lowest "D" and play the note names going up. D,E,F,G,A,B,C, and you should find yourself back at "D." Try to think of clues to help yourself remember which notes are located where. One common device for remembering "D" is to think that "D" is in the "Doghouse" between the two black keys.



Once you've mastered finding notes on the keyboard it's time to start looking at an actual piece of music. As you look at a piece of sheet music you see that there are 2 groups of 5 lines each, connected by a bracket. This is called the Grand Staff . The grand staff is made up of the treble staff and the bass staff . Each staff is marked by their respective clef signs. On each staff you will see the key signature and the time signature, which will be explained in a later lesson. The grand staff is where notes will be placed that correspond to keys on the piano. It's now time to begin learning note names.



Got the first lesson Ma'am...coz i am familiar with the position of the white keys and the Octave...but that is far as i can go.
Anyway, i find the clues like Doghouse rather interesting...it makes things easier to memorize...cool method of teaching...
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Posted 4/6/08

gracee21 wrote:

Lesson 2:



In this lesson we will explore how to find note names on the staff and also use the above chart to learn the values of certain notes. This is where you progress from playing by finger numbers to reading actual notes on the page. Both the treble and bass staffs are made up of 5 lines. In between you can see there are 4 spaces. The letter names of notes on the lines follow the pattern E,G,B,D,F. Mnemonic devices such as "Every Good Boy Does Fine," can help you to memorize the letter names of the lines. The four spaces are labeled F,A,C,E. As you can see, the letters spell the word FACE, and are therefore easier to remember. Practice some drills naming random letters of the lines and spaces and then locating those notes on the keyboard. Don't become frustrated if this part of the lesson is difficult. It will take some practice before playing notes on the keyboard becomes automatic.



The next step is to incorporate rhythm into playing. So far you have learned the notes of the piano and where they are written on the staff. Yet there are many different kinds of notes that you need to be familar with. The note value chart given on this page will help you visualize the basic note durations and their names. Rhythms in music are divided into beats, and those beats are divided into measures and time signatures , as you will learn later on. For right now we will deal with playing notes along to a steady beat. The quarter note is the most basic. This note most commonly gets one beat of a group of four beats. There are two eighth notes for every quarter note. When you divide an eighth note in two you get a sixteenth note , etc. Longer than a quarter note is a half note , which equals two quarter notes, in this case 2 beats. The whole note will sound for the entire measure, for four beats in our practice rhythm. There are always 2 half notes for every whole note. You will eventually come across notes that have a dot next to them. This indicates that half of the note's original length is now added to the note. For example, a quarter with a dot now equals one and a half counts. Although this probably sounds confusing right now, it will become easier once we cover time signatures in the later chapters. For now just concentrate on memorizing how many smaller notes equal a larger one. For instance, 2 eighth notes equal 1 quarter note. 2 quarter notes equal a half note, and so on.


Know this stuff too....
*reminiscing highschool grade school music class*
Every Good Boy Does Fine.... FACE...
2 eighth notes equal 1 quarter note....2 quarter notes equal a half note...

*Memorizing...repeating...speaking aloud alone in her room*
Moderator
1783 cr points
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30 / F / Italy
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Posted 4/6/08

gracee21 wrote:

Helpful Terms
Accent ~ Marking above or below note head that indicates note is to be stressed with emphasis.
Accidentals ~ Sharps, flats, or naturals that indicate notes other than those indicated by the key signature.
Arpeggio ~ Chord in which the notes are separated to produce a broken effect.
Asymmetrical Meter ~ Meter in which the beats cannot be divided equally into groups of two or three.
Augmented ~ An interval or chord that is one half step smaller than minor or perfect.
Authentic Cadence ~ Cadence from V to I at the end of a musical phrase.
Bass Staff ~ The lower of the two staves in the grand staff containing low pitches.
Block Chord ~ Chord in which all the notes are played simultaneously.
Borrowed Chord ~ Chord taken from a parallel major or minor key.
Cadence ~ Last two chords in a musical phrase.
Cantus Firmus ~ Main line or phrase composed in voice leading.
Circle of Fifths ~ Pattern of notes used to show key signatures and their relationships in a clock diagram.
Compound Meter ~ Meter in which the beat is a dotted note.
Consonance ~ Sound resulting from an interval or chord that is pleasant or resolved.
Counterpoint ~ Line written against the cantus firmus in voice leading.
Crescendo ~ Dynamics marking that indicates increasing in volume.
Deceptive Cadence ~ Cadence in which the penultimate chord is V and the second chord is anything but the expected tonic.
Decrescendo ~ Dynamics marking that indicates decreasing in volume.
Development ~ Second section in a piece of music written in sonata form or fugue form that develops the themes introduced in the exposition.
Diminished ~ An interval or chord that is one half step smaller than minor or perfect.
Dissonance ~ Sound resulting from an interval or chord that is harsh or unresolved.
Duple Meter ~ Meter in which the beats can be grouped by twos.
Dynamics ~ Expression markings that indicate the loudness or softness of music.
Eighth Note ~ Filled in note with flag that represents a certain duration of a beat indicated by the time signature.
Enharmonic ~ Two intervals that share the same distance but different spellings, ex. aug 2nd, min. 3rd.
Exposition ~ First section of a piece written in sonata form or fugue form that introduces the main themes.
Flat ~ Accidental that indicates that the note that follows it should be lowered one half step.
Grand Staff ~ Both the treble and bass staves linked together by a bracket.
Half Note ~ Hollow note with no flag that represents a certain duration of a beat indicated by the time signature.
Harmonic Interval ~ Interval in which both notes are played simultaneously.
Harmonic Minor Scale ~ Form of minor scale that is the equivalent of the natural minor with a raised 7th scale degree.
Intervals ~ Distance between notes that make steps or skips in music.
Key Signature ~ Marking at the beginning of a measure that indicates which notes will be played most often.
Leading Tone ~ One half step down from the tonic. The 7th scale degree that leads to the tonic.
Legato ~ Expression marking that indicates notes are to be played smooth and connected.
Major Key ~ Key that sounds bright. Found by going up one half step from last sharp or indicated by second to last flat.
Major Scale ~ Scale that follows the pattern of whole and half steps from any two "C's" on the piano.
Measure ~ Distance between two bar lines in a piece of music, also called one bar.
Melodic interval ~ Interval in which the notes are played separately.
Melodic Minor ~ Form of minor scale that is the equivalent of the natural minor with raised 6th and 7th scale degrees ascending, and the natural minor descending.
Minor Key ~ Key that sounds dark. Key name can be found by using the relative minor key of major keys
Modulation ~ The process of changing from one key to a closely related key, those that differ in one accidental.
Natural Minor Scale ~ Scale that follows the pattern of whole and half steps from any two "A's" on the piano.
Non-Harmonic Tone ~ Note played along with a chord that is note a traditional note of the chord
Octave ~ The distance between two keys of the same letter name, also the interval of an 8th.
Picardy Third ~ Major third in the tonic chord in a minor key. Used to produce a resolved major sound at the end of a phrase in a minor key.
Plagal Cadence ~ Cadence from IV to I at the end of a musical phrase.
Quarter Note ~ Filled in note with no flag that represents a certain duration of a beat indicated by the time signature.
Recapitulation ~ Final section in a piece of music written in sonata form or fugue form that repeats the themes presented in the exposition, and returns to the original key if modulation has occurred.
Relative Minor ~ Minor key that shares the same key signature with a major key. Found by going down 3 half steps from the major key name.
Rondo ~ Form in music that has a recurring section, the most common being ABACA and ABACABA.
Root ~ Tonic note of a chord. The lowest note when in root position.
Sharp ~ Accidental that indicates that the note which follows it should be raised one half step.
Simple Meter ~ Meter in which the beat can be divided by two.
Sixteenth Note ~ Filled in note with two flags that represents a certain duration of a beat indicated by the time signature.
Slur ~ Curved line around note heads that indicates those notes are to be played legato.
Species one Counterpoint ~ Form of voice written composition that is note-against-note.
Staccato ~ Dote above or below note head that indicates articulation of the note is short.
Time Signature ~ Symbol at the beginning of both staves that indicates the number and length of beats in a piece of music.
Treble Staff ~ The top staff in the grand staff containing higher pitches than the bass staff.
Triad ~ A chord built in thirds that includes a root, (tonic) third, and fifth.
Triple Meter ~ Meter in which the beats can be grouped by threes.
Whole Note ~ Hollow note with no stem that represents a certain duration of a beat indicated by the time signature.



Ohhhhh...this is a lot of load work...but its ok i think it is necessary to increase my vocabulary in music...
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1783 cr points
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30 / F / Italy
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Posted 4/6/08

gracee21 wrote:

that's all for now, tomorrow we will take up lesson3 & 4...

please master lesson1&2

goodluck


Thanks Master....see you next lesson...
really enjoyed you lesson....
* Bow and wave good-bye*


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