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Where Do Deleted Files Go?
FZTime 
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Posted 4/11/08 , edited 4/15/08

gourdbreaker wrote:


FZTime wrote:

Cleaning Recycle Bin does not permanently delete all your file.s it keeps it incase u really want to get it back. I've been there, tried that, done that. However not all stuff can be recovered. documents and pictures maybe able to be recovered. but anything else like programs, once u empty from recycle bin, away it goes. It all depends though.
It actually stored somewhere...for a period of time. before permanently deleting. So before they permanently delete it, u can use programs to restore ur files after u emptied recycle bin. however, there is loss of data and the file retrieved might not be complete.

Sorry for being a computer geek XD


i'm just curious, how do you do that recovering deleted files? ^^


that was soo long ago =) i forgot already. erm search around google or something =) i stumbled upon so i cant really remember. gomen! =) haf fun!
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Posted 4/11/08 , edited 4/15/08

FZTime wrote:


gourdbreaker wrote:


FZTime wrote:

Cleaning Recycle Bin does not permanently delete all your file.s it keeps it incase u really want to get it back. I've been there, tried that, done that. However not all stuff can be recovered. documents and pictures maybe able to be recovered. but anything else like programs, once u empty from recycle bin, away it goes. It all depends though.
It actually stored somewhere...for a period of time. before permanently deleting. So before they permanently delete it, u can use programs to restore ur files after u emptied recycle bin. however, there is loss of data and the file retrieved might not be complete.

Sorry for being a computer geek XD


i'm just curious, how do you do that recovering deleted files? ^^


that was soo long ago =) i forgot already. erm search around google or something =) i stumbled upon so i cant really remember. gomen! =) haf fun!


it's okay! thanks by the way! ^^
Posted 4/11/08 , edited 4/15/08

anti-freeze wrote:
I have found that most Unix machines do a little more than unlinking the data.

What makes you think that? And which filesystem are you talking about? There are probably at least 20 of them in general use.

gourdbreaker: Do a google search on "data recovery utility" or "undelete utility." There are a few free ones that suck but still kind of work.
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Posted 4/11/08 , edited 4/15/08

shibole wrote:


anti-freeze wrote:
I have found that most Unix machines do a little more than unlinking the data.

What makes you think that? And which filesystem are you talking about? There are probably at least 20 of them in general use.

gourdbreaker: Do a google search on "data recovery utility" or "undelete utility." There are a few free ones that suck but still kind of work.
Generally when I talk about windows file systems I am talking about Fat32 and NTFS, and the fabled WinFS... if it exists yet. Windows has always had crappy methods for moving data. Other file systems such as XFS, ZFS, UFS, ext2, ext3, HFS... ummm what else. Yeah pretty much everything else, you either have to suffer to get your data back or it is just flat out gone.

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Posted 4/11/08 , edited 4/15/08
If you ever run disk defragmenter (and you should) you’ll see bits of white space in the diagram. I always figured that you could somehow restore what was in those spaces until they were filled or you defrag’d it.

That was just a total guess though.

But if you don’t run defrag then you’ll end up with bits of file stored everywhere!

I can make my computer do things. I don't need to understand why they work.
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Posted 4/11/08 , edited 4/15/08
is it the same concept for macs? you're given two choices: empty trash or secure empty trash, what's the difference?
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Posted 4/11/08 , edited 4/15/08
Secure empty trash

You tie the files down first.
Posted 4/11/08 , edited 4/15/08

anti-freeze wrote:
Generally when I talk about windows file systems I am talking about Fat32 and NTFS, and the fabled WinFS... if it exists yet. Windows has always had crappy methods for moving data. Other file systems such as XFS, ZFS, UFS, ext2, ext3, HFS... ummm what else. Yeah pretty much everything else, you either have to suffer to get your data back or it is just flat out gone.

I think the difference is that, with the DOS/windows filesystems each block references the next block in the file. When the FAT entry is marked deleted I think it's still possible to reassemble files based on links in the blocks themselves.

With the unix filesystems, once the inodes are reused you just have a bunch of random blocks, but the important thing is that the data is still there even if there's less data available on what sequences the blocks were in. So if you had passwords stored in an unencrypted file and you deleted it, I'm not convinced they'd really be much harder to recover on a typical "unix" fs vs. a windows fs.


blu3sky wrote:
is it the same concept for macs? you're given two choices: empty trash or secure empty trash, what's the difference?

Modern macs essentially use a "unix" style filesystem similar to linux.

Secure empty trash will overwrite the files with different patterns of 1's and 0's (like "0000...", "1111...", "101010...", "011011011...") like 30 times or something before deleting them. This even makes them more difficult to recover using advanced forensic techniques, and totally impossible to recover via software. It will cause emptying the trash to take 100 times longer though.
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Posted 4/11/08 , edited 4/15/08
When you empty your recycle bin, the files aren't fully deleted, they're still in your computer in your OS, the OS just doesn't know how to find it. However, relatively easy to retrieve deleted files with the right software. If I'm not wrong, if you defrag your computer.. those files that have been deleted will be permanently deleted and cannot be retrieve anymore, there are softwares that delete files permanently..

I remember, when the computer of my friend has a virus, all of his .doc files are deleted, he asked me if I can help him retrieve those files.. I've succesfully helped him, I retrieved all of his .doc files, but all of it are damaged.. brutally damaged.. ahaha.. So he cried..


gourdbreaker wrote:

not totally deleted? so even if i deleted a virus-infected file, my computer is still under threat?


Maybe, b'cos when I recovered the file of my friend, some of it are still infected.. and I've seen in the list
that the virus are still there, wanting to be recovered too.. ahaha
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Posted 4/11/08 , edited 4/15/08
when a file is deleted most of the file disappears completely, but there are parts left behind called fragments, these dont usualy ever get deleted permanetly but there are programs u can get that will delete these fragments, but theres a technique thats been developed that will allow the cops and feds to look at the files on ur computer over 4 rewrites ago, so resetting ur computer multiple times wont stop them, the technique invovles shooting electrons at the hard disk in order to fine read what is left on there, and there are ways of recovering deleted files from the fragments left on ur harddrive, just google it and u should be able to find out about this stuff
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Posted 4/11/08 , edited 4/15/08
this is very amusing. there was actually trouble in my country, a government run place for unemployment ca;;ed centerlink were having a computer auction and everyones personal information was being made public for everyone that realised how to get it. names, addresses, social security numbers, bank accounts, etc etc.
Posted 4/11/08 , edited 4/15/08

cepreeper wrote:
when a file is deleted most of the file disappears completely, but there are parts left behind called fragments, these dont usualy ever get deleted permanetly

This is false. When a file is deleted, none of the file disappears completely at first. Eventually all blocks of the deleted file will be overwritten as the blocks are reused, but how complete the overwrite is at any given times depends on disk usage patterns. In any case it's false to say that "these dont usualy ever get deleted."

Also, fragments are something else, totally unrelated to file deletion.
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Posted 4/13/08 , edited 4/15/08

anti-freeze wrote:

Well it is hard to say exactly. Basically what your computer does when it deletes something is it sets the bits that the file took up, back to 0. As anyone who knows anything about computers knows, all compputerized data are just ones and zeros. So technically this would mean that they are being wiped from existence. Since, data is so large these days individual bits do not really matter.... ok they do matter but you guys know what I mean. When you zero out data it wipes it from the plane of existence. So to answer your question the data ceases to be.


that's really fascinating
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Posted 4/13/08 , edited 4/15/08
to data heaven .... porn goes to data hell
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