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Post Reply The archery Ground
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Posted 4/17/08 , edited 5/10/08
Well, i welcome everyone .... Im the leader of the bow group, and im really glad all of you are here. Next well are going to learn about bows and arrows and how to use it properly , we are also going to learn to control ourselves, to be calm in any situation...
this is my first time being a leader (i used to be always moving from the shadows ) so hope we have a really good time


The Bow Group:
Leader: patty_mara

2nd: inubleach123 (mizuki)


3rd: eloide


4th: musicgurlz (snow)
needs pic

5th: kashigan (Keiji)


6th: xsamuraizx (Kaoru)


7th: Kaoruluver108 (luna)


8th: hitsugayaLuver (hikari)


9th:snowmonkey (Mika)



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Posted 4/18/08
Little history

A bow is a weapon that projects arrows powered by the elasticity of the bow. As the bow is drawn, energy is stored in the limbs of the bow and transformed into rapid motion when the string is released, with the string transferring this force to the arrow. The bow is used for hunting and sport (target shooting), and in historical times it was a weapon of war.

The technique of using a bow is called archery. Someone who makes bows is known as a bowyer, and one who makes arrows a fletcher. Together with the atlatl and the sling, the bow was one of the first ranged weapons or hunting tools which used mechanical principles, instead of relying solely on the strength of its user.

Many bow designs have been used in different cultures and time periods. Common designs include the widespread long bows (Europe, North and South America, Africa and Asia), short bows (South African Bushmen), laminated wood (Japanese and Sami bows), sinew-backed bows (common in North America), and the horn-wood-sinew composite (Eurasian nomads, also used for centuries in the Middle East, the later Roman Empire, China, Korea, and India). In modern times, the recurve and compound bows dominate for sport and hunting practices. Newer materials, including flexible plastics, fiberglass, and carbon fibers, have led to increases in range and projectile velocity.
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Posted 4/20/08
wow, never knew about the different bow designs lol.

Anyway, I will be under your care from now on mara-sensei. *bows*
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Posted 4/20/08

xsamuraizx wrote:

wow, never knew about the different bow designs lol.

Anyway, I will be under your care from now on mara-sensei. *bows*


great.... well hope the other members of the group can join here.... well first step would be to choice what can of bow is more suitable for all of you....
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Posted 4/20/08
So i will ask all of you firts to enter tell me what youwant to know more about archery..... and what you want to learn here...
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Posted 4/20/08
hmmm, I actually dont know much about archery. I still can't aim and shoot at targets lol.
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Posted 4/20/08
traditional bow types

Longbow Longbows were ideally made from yew, but white woods elm, ash, hazel and brazil-wood were commonly used according to availability. Longbows were often built to be as tall as the archer, and a well-made bow could shoot well in excess of 300 yards (275 meters) using light arrows. A longbow archer could shoot up to 10 arrows per minute; a crossbowman or arbalestier of the Hundred Years War could only shoot up to three.
A famous example is the English longbow, carried by English (and Welsh) soldiers to great effect in the Hundred Years' War. At this time it was called the "war bow". At close range the longbow was capable of penetrating all but the very best plate armor of the time. At a distance, groups of archers would loose mass volleys on a high, arching trajectory at enemy formations. The arrows used were heavy, up to 4 ounces (112 grams) or more, with narrow heavy bodkin pointed heads and thick arrows often made of ash. This style of bow was used up until the time of the English Civil War but was almost completely replaced by the musket, mostly because of the years of training involved with archery.
Construction of a longbow begins with a stave of yew or another suitable wood. The stave is worked down a few growth rings on the back to ensure that the bow has some sapwood and mostly heartwood. White woods such as elm or ash need not be worked down a growth-ring, the sapwood in these woods are as strong as the heartwood. The stave is then "tillered" so the center of the bow is thicker than mid-limb, and mid-limb is thicker than the tips. Nocks are filed and the stave is braced low and rasped or planed more to ensure that the bow bends evenly. The bow is tillered eventually to full brace and then full draw, allowing the bow a few extra pounds to make up for poundage lost when the bow is broken in.
Yew sapwood is elastic in tension and yew heartwood is elastic in compression. This combination makes a durable bow. Modern yew bows are often backed with a thin layer of rawhide to keep from splintering or breaking on the back, since yew is so expensive. Although the whitewoods will make an English longbow if specially treated, they are better suited to making flatbows.

Yumi A yumi is a Japanese longbow used in the practice of kyūdō. Traditionally made from a laminate of bamboo, wood, and leather, yumi are of asymmetrical design, with the grip positioned at about one-third the distance from the lower tip. It is believed the shape was designed for use on horseback, allowing the bow to be more easily moved from one side of the horse to the other.
Unlike most archery disciplines, the yumi is not drawn with fingers alone, but with a ridge on the thumb of the leather glove or yugake, worn on the back hand. This meant the draw weight was not limited to the finger strength of the shooter. Instead, a more relaxed and holistic technique was developed and the yumi was drawn not just with the arm, but with kyūdōka, the whole breadth and being of the archer. The arrow was often nocked to the "wrong" or far side of the bow to allow quicker setting of the arrow, and the string was released not by relaxing the hand, but by altering the posture of the back hand wrist, allowing the string to slip over the ridge of the glove; the thumb becomes part of a rigid frame with the wrist piece, effectively negating finger strength in the process of shooting.

Flatbow The limbs of a flatbow have a rectangular or rhombic cross-section, rather than curved or "crowned" as with a longbow. The typical modern flatbow is made from a whitewood such as ash, hickory, hazel, or oak, with limbs about 2 inches (5 cm) wide, tapering in the last outer third of the limbs to ½-inch (1 cm) nocks. It is often made about 66 inches (1.67 m) long and tillered elliptically, with good potential for high draw weights. This is a good form of bow because it allows anyone to make an excellent bow with little expense; many suitable whitewoods are cheap and plentiful, whereas yew and osage are expensive and the supply of good material is limited.

Short bow A shortbow is any shorter version of the longbow, flatbow, or composite design. By definition it does not allow the archer to draw the string to the face or body, so accuracy is more difficult to attain. The shorter draw stores less energy and hence has a lesser velocity and maximum range; it also requires less energy output from the archer. It is quicker to shoot, more manoeuvrable, easier to conceal, and requires less work and material. Correspondingly short arrows may be used, similarly easier to make, lighter, and less unwieldy than those for a longer bow.
Such bows may still be deadly weapons, effective at penetrating body cavities of large animals including humans. Short bows were used for hunting by, among others, many tribes of the North American West Coast and Plains (often with a flat or lenticular cross-section) and by South African Bushmen (often with a rounded cross-section similar to the classic longbow). Early Eurasian composite bows are short bows, as depicted in ancient Greek art and found in central Asia.They are still in use in Africa for hunting, for self-defence, and in inter-ethnic clashes.

Composite bow A composite bow is laminated from different materials to produce a bow. The Asiatic traditional composite bows use horn on the belly and sinew on the back, often with a wooden core to provide a gluing surface. The bows are backed with sinew because it is very elastic. Sinew will also shrink and pull a bow into reflex. The horn on the belly is very strong in compression and can handle a high draw weight without taking a set. These Asiatic bows were often highly recurved and reflexed, giving a short bow the ability to store lots of energy and shoot nearly as fast as a much longer bow. Modern, non traditional "composite" bows use laminated wood, plastic, and fiberglass.

Crossbow The crossbow is a small bow attached to a wooden support and drawn towards a nut or pin. When a trigger is pressed, the pin or nut releases the bow string, shooting the bolt. The crossbow requires little effort to shoot, but early on took great strength to load, though this was solved by adding a windlass or crank. Another means of loading the crossbow was to use a small hook attached to the belt of the archer. The archer would then hold the crossbow still by slipping his foot into a foothold at the tip of the bow. He then pulled the bowstring back by placing the hook in the crossbow's string and standing up. This permitted the shooter to use his legs, instead of his arms, to pull back the string. This method was not long-lived in European land warfare, however, because the crossbow was soon after replaced by the musket.

The oldest remains of crossbows are found in East Asia and date back to 2000 BC. Some crossbows are known as a bowgun. They launch stones or lead. This Chinese invention dates back to at least 300 BC.
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Posted 4/20/08
wow, I knew some of the type of bows, but not the history behind them. o_o
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Posted 4/20/08
I don't like crossbows, to me they seem ehh
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Posted 4/20/08

kashigan wrote:

I don't like crossbows, to me they seem ehh


wel yeah same here... but they are a type of bows...
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Posted 4/20/08 , edited 4/20/08
there are another two bow types........ modern bow types

Recurve bow Some bows are recurved, with the ends bending away from the archer when the bow is unstrung. A "recurve bow" in modern archery usually describes a specific type of modern bow, usually made mainly of fibreglass.

Compound bow A compound bow is a modern bow that has pulleys, cams, or wheels at the end of each limb through which the bow string passes. As the bow is drawn, the pulleys or cams turn, which in turn changes the leverage of the bows' limbs. They are normally made to give a high resistance in the middle of the draw, and significant "let-off" at the end; this enables the bow to store a lot of energy while still being easy to hold and aim at full draw. They are little affected by changes in temperature or humidity and will give high speed at a lower draw weight compared to the simple bow. Unlike traditional bows, compound bows are always made of modern materials such as aluminium and carbon fiber. They were first developed and patented by Holless Wilbur Allen in the United States in the 1960s and have become increasingly popular.
With a traditional bow, the force required to draw the bow increases as the bow is drawn. This limits the total amount of energy and means that when the archer is at full draw and aiming, they have to hold the maximum draw weight of the bow.


The first assigment is to choice whetever is the bow that you prefer or like...... i will wait till eveyone has choice his/her type of bow
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Posted 4/20/08
The compound bow looks kind of weird o.O

and I prefer either the Yumi
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Posted 4/21/08
-enters- so do we have any cupids yet?
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Posted 4/22/08

luluuu wrote:

-enters- so do we have any cupids yet? :P


just waiting here to here for the others
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