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Myths Of Your Country
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27 / M / Netherlands
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Posted 2/13/07
in wich country do you live XxIlluminatorxX...?
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27 / M / lazing in England
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Posted 2/13/07
Scotland
Almost everything you think you know about Scotland was largely invented during Queen Victoria and her uncle's time - the short kilt, the clan system, family clan tartan, etc.

The Highlands are thought to hold the bloodiest and most violent history in Scotland, but in fact it was the Borders that can claim that credit as it was home to a long history of wars, conflicts, family feuds, forced marriages, etc.

No one in the Highlands could speak Scots well until around 1840s. Up to then they spoke Gaelic and some European languages (French, Polish, Italian, mostly) due to the merchant road by sea between the highlands and Europe. Scots is a lowlands language.

Great Britain:
Many believe immigrants didn't move to Britain until a period between 1920s and 1950s, but in fact it dates back to 15th century - Arabs, Africans, Caribbeans, Chinese men, etc. Historians, painters and novelists chose to ignore them, but there are records of their existence in Britain that long ago.

The original capital of England was York.

UK = United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (Belfast)
Great Britain = England (London), Scotland (Edinburgh) and Wales (Cardiff).
Scotland has its own law, tax and education systems.
So why people around the world refer Britain as 'England'?!

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Posted 2/13/07
INDIA
I honesly dont know where to begin with this T_T we have like a million myths and legends rich but it would take me like the whole day to even start and begin explaining one of them
Posted 2/13/07
Everyone knows "Handsel und Gretel" (the 2 kids who find the ginger-bread house)
There's also the Wagner Opera's which are all dramatisations of German folk tales, for example;
The Flying Dutchman
Siegfried and Isolde
The Rheinmaidens
The Rheingold
The Walkyeries

Big Myth - All Germans are Nazis
Big Truth - Germany is really tidy
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76 / M / Under the bridge
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Posted 2/13/07
There are lots of myths in the philippines but the one that freaks me out the most is the tiyanak. Basically its the offspring of a human and a ghost/monster/demon, it looks like a normal baby but when you get close to it it changes to its true form and goes RAWR.... lol when my baby bro was born i honestly thought he was a tiyanak and i was scared as hell.
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27 / M / Tx
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Posted 2/13/07
Bigfoot. hes such a character.
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34 / M / 中国
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Posted 2/13/07

henz_lan wrote:

Everyone knows "Handsel und Gretel" (the 2 kids who find the ginger-bread house)
There's also the Wagner Opera's which are all dramatisations of German folk tales, for example;
The Flying Dutchman
Siegfried and Isolde
The Rheinmaidens
The Rheingold
The Walkyeries

Big Myth - All Germans are Nazis
Big Truth - Germany is really tidy


This is very true. I've been around quite a bit, and germany is one of the cleanest countries I've ever been to.
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22 / F / nyc
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Posted 2/28/07
all of you guys must have heard of it:D
the choosing of the animals to be the 12 zodiac race XD
Posted 2/28/07
the scots share many with the irish and the welsh, tho by a few different names. the dullahan, the banshee, the black wolf/dog, pixie, kelpie...all are in scotland as well, under a few different names.

http://www.pantheon.org/areas/mythology/ here
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33 / F / Houston,TX
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Posted 2/28/07

killar wrote:

The myth that everything in Texas is 'bigger'. I never really understood why people think that. Also the myth that everyone in Texas rides horses and has a pasture.

And whats really odd is that whenever I'm traveling and I tell people I live in Texas the first thing they say is [retard voice] "Ain't everthang sposed ta be bigger in Texas?"[/retard voice]

Honestly, give me a break.



haha i hear ya! i live in houston for like 3 years now, and i remmber my friend (who's younger than me) asked me if theres cows and horses running around the nieghborhood.. man! i laughed so hard when she asked me that..
Posted 2/28/07

catex wrote:

Scotland
Almost everything you think you know about Scotland was largely invented during Queen Victoria and her uncle's time - the short kilt, the clan system, family clan tartan, etc.

The Highlands are thought to hold the bloodiest and most violent history in Scotland, but in fact it was the Borders that can claim that credit as it was home to a long history of wars, conflicts, family feuds, forced marriages, etc.

No one in the Highlands could speak Scots well until around 1840s. Up to then they spoke Gaelic and some European languages (French, Polish, Italian, mostly) due to the merchant road by sea between the highlands and Europe. Scots is a lowlands language.



btw, that isnt all true. the clans have been around since before the normans even came to england, the romans had multiple articles about it. the tartans were around as well, and kilts have been around too (tho, as you said, they were not the short kilts). my own clan is far far older than the english royal family, and most clans wore their tartan (altho there were less clans, there had been less inter-marriage at the time) even then. the icenii had their own tartan before there WAS and england, long before anyone but celts and romans were there. and while they were not in scotland, it is safe to assume the people not too far north of them did much the same.

as for the gaelic bit, that is partially true, however, scots isn't a language, per se, it is a dialectual thing, taken fron germanic language (angle and saxon languages) that developed due to the gaelic pronunciation of words. as english did not exist yet, scots did not. but once english sprang up, scots did alongside it, as it is a simple dialectual different, a vernacular of english.

and the highlands ARE the bloodiest and most brutal of the history of the scottish people, but not of the country. the borderlands, as you said, had far more warring due to the english and welsh, and landholdings by families, and large feuds (scottish civil war, and scottish war of independence both started in this way). however, before there was an england, the picts and the scots fought, dal'ratia and pictavia were at war often, and most of that fighting occured in the highlands, or the lowland/highland divide (as to the south were the soon-to-be english, the anglo-saxon kingdoms, with a small mixing of norman by then). so while the bloodiest were in the highlands or near the divide, that was a loooooong time ago. most of the fighting from around 900 on was in the lowlands and borderlands (thats how border horses, hobbie horses, got their names, if i am not mistaken)
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26 / F / so cal
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Posted 2/28/07
seems like a lot of country have some kind of myths...i live in california and i don't hear about any
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28 / M / Montréal, Canada
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Posted 2/28/07
Canada has a lot of ghost but as for myths, Bc has the OGOPOGO. Kind of like nessy, its more of a snake than sea monster.
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27 / M / lazing in England
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Posted 2/28/07
^ There were two clan systems - the tribal clan system and the 'family clan' system. The one you're talking about is the latter, which was created some time during 17th or 18th century and it's modelled on the English-styled hierarchy. Any decent Scottish historian will tell you that.

I think you're confused over what I said about tartan. I said the family clan tartan was created in 18th century. Tartan did exist that far back, you're right, but not 'family clan tartan', e.g. associating a clan with a specific tartan pattern - this was created/invented in 18th century.

- I don't think it's not possible for anyone to trade their family blood line through a tribal clan system that far back because a) to pledge your loyalty to a tribal clan, you adopt the clan's surname and if you're not happy, you can switch your pledge to a different clan and adopt that clan name; b) while surnames weren't much in use in the highlands, children took their surnames from their mothers, not their fathers (when you do your family research earlier than 17th century, follow the maternal line, not the paternal line), c) not all members of a clan were related (sons didn't get elected to take over their fathers' place; it was done through their idea of an election).

- while I agree with what you are saying, but I think quite a few native Scots speakers will have a serious issue with your comments. Again no offence, but I was talking about the geographical layout of linguistics in Scotland and northern England, so I still stand by my comment: Scots wasn't used in Highlands until roughly 1840s. Period.

- most battles involving highlanders took place in central Scotland, not the Highlands. Again you have to take in account over 800 battles that took place in Scotland and if we were to put all coloured pins of all these battles on a map, you will find that the largest percentage took place in the Borders. Then again, this issue has always been a popular debate, so let's agree that you and I are right and wrong.
Posted 2/28/07

catex wrote:

^ There were two clan systems - the tribal clan system and the 'family clan' system. The one you're talking about is the latter, which was created some time during 17th or 18th century and it's modelled on the English-styled hierarchy. Any decent Scottish historian will tell you that.

I think you're confused over what I said about tartan. I said the family clan tartan was created in 18th century. Tartan did exist that far back, you're right, but not 'family clan tartan', e.g. associating a clan with a specific tartan pattern - this was created/invented in 18th century.

- I don't think it's not possible for anyone to trade their family blood line through a tribal clan system that far back because a) to pledge your loyalty to a tribal clan, you adopt the clan's surname and if you're not happy, you can switch your pledge to a different clan and adopt that clan name; b) while surnames weren't much in use in the highlands, children took their surnames from their mothers, not their fathers (when you do your family research earlier than 17th century, follow the maternal line, not the paternal line), c) not all members of a clan were related (sons didn't get elected to take over their fathers' place; it was done through their idea of an election).

- while I agree with what you are saying, but I think quite a few native Scots speakers will have a serious issue with your comments. Again no offence, but I was talking about the geographical layout of linguistics in Scotland and northern England, so I still stand by my comment: Scots wasn't used in Highlands until roughly 1840s. Period.

- most battles involving highlanders took place in central Scotland, not the Highlands. Again you have to take in account over 800 battles that took place in Scotland and if we were to put all coloured pins of all these battles on a map, you will find that the largest percentage took place in the Borders. Then again, this issue has always been a popular debate, so let's agree that you and I are right and wrong.


1. the clans were still family based...and have been for hundreds upon hundreds of years. balliol, bruce, comyn, graham, macdougal, montrose...all of these can be traced back, as clans, at LEAST to the time of alexander III. and they did have clan tartans, tho maybe not as diverse and nearly as many, the icenii had a seperate tartan from their neighbors, and that was more than a millenia before victora.

2. scots as the language it is today may not have popped up til then, but it was a dialectual differenciation from english, based on the pronuncations...while it may not have been called scots, or even a seperate language, the only majors changes in it since the times of old angle german have been the same changes as in english.

3. battles after the roman wall was built, but before the time of say alexander were mostly fought in the highlands or lowland/highland line (it is where my clan is from, the line). it was until later, warring with the people in the south, that battles were fought in the borderlands.

4. tribal clan system wasn't just about the name, it was also about the geography. montrose and menteith have been in their respective areas for years upon years (montrose was established there due to graems dyke). and many have been there far longer, are full blooded celtic (mostly in the highlands and islands) with no norman interaction or germanic interaction. clans were based more upon that, a persons birth, than upon to whom they were born.

as for the trace of lineage through the mother, that is only partially correct. it depends on where, when, and who. the normans, romans, and germanics all used paternal, and that was adopted to a degree (that is how most nobility traced their lines, and how the houses of comyn, balliol and bruce came to war, as well as 2 other families who i cant remember). that cant be said completely one way or the other, as both were used.


edit: oh, and also, it is a myth that scots have sex with sheep. we like all ungulates equally...
bring on the llamas!
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