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Post Reply About Korea
Posted 5/7/08 , edited 8/22/08
hey every one ,,,im starting this topic because i wanna share you this information about korea...

first;
(1)Hangul story

Koreans use their own unique alphabet called Hangul. It is considered to be one of the most efficient alphabets in the world and has garnered unanimous praise from language experts for its scientific design and excellence.


Hangul was created under King Sejong during the Choson Dynasty (1393-1910). in 1446, the first Korean alphabet was proclaimed under the original name Hunmin chong-um, which literally meant "the correct sounds for the instruction of the people."

King Sejong, the creator of Hangul, is considered to be one of the greatest rulers in the history of Korea. Highly respected for his benevolent disposition and diligence, King Sejong was also a passionate scholar whose knowledge and natural talent in all fields of study astounded even the most learned experts.

During his reign, King Sejong always deplored the fact that the common people, ignorant of the complicated Chinese characters that were being used by the educated, were not able to read and write. He understood their frustration in not being able to read or to communicate their thoughts and feelings in written words.



(2)
History of Hangul - Part II

The Chinese script was used by the intelligentsia of the country, but being of foreign origin, it could not fully express the words and meaning of Korean thoughts and spoken language. Therefore, common people with legitimate complaints had no way of submitting their grievances to the appropriate authorities, other than through oral communication, and they had no way to record for posterity the agricultural wisdom and knowledge they had gained through years of experience.

King Sejong felt great sympathy for the people. As a revolutionary ruler strongly dedicated to national identity and cultural independence, he immediately searched for solutions. What he envisioned was a set of letters that was uniquely Korean and easily learnable, rendering it accessible and usable for the common people.

Thus, the Hunmin chong-um was born. In the preface of its proclamation, King Sejong states, "Being of foreign origin, Chinese characters are incapable of capturing uniquely Korean meanings. Therefore, many common people have no way to express their thoughts and feelings. Out of my sympathy for their difficulties, I have created a set of 28 letters. The letters are very easy to learn, and it is my fervent hope that they improve the quality of life of all people." The statement captures the essence of King Sejong's determination and dedication to cultural independence and commitment to the welfare of the people.

(3)
History of Hangul - Part III

When first proclaimed by King Sejong, Hunmin chong-um had 28 letters in all, of which only 24 are in use today.

A Korean syllable is divided into three parts: Ch'osong (initial consonant), chungsong (peak vowel), and chongsong (final consonant). This is the basic framework that King Sejong and the Chiphyonjon scholars adhered to when created the letters. Chongsong was not separately created and was a repetition of the ch'osong. Therefore, Hangul is the consonants and vowels.

The Korean language has a well-developed and expansive vocabulary, and therefore, it is very difficult to express fully in foreign letter.

Because of its simplicity and the rather small number of letters, Hangul is very easy to learn even by children and foreigners.

It is no coincidence that by the time they reach the ages of two or three, most Korean children are already capable of expressing their feelings and thoughts, albeit in primitive form. By the time they reach school age, most exhibit mastery of Hangul, which is indeed a rare phenomena throughout the world. This fact clearly attests to the easy learnability and accessibility of the Korean alphabet.

Throughout history, Hangul has been at the root of the Korean culture, helping to preserve its national identity and independence.

Illiteracy is virtually nonexistent in Korea. This is another fact that attests to the easy learnability of Hangul. It is not uncommon for a foreigner to gain a working knowledge of Hangul after one or two hours of intensive studying. In addition, because of its scientific design, Hangul lends itself to easy mechanization. In this age of computers into their lives without difficulties, thanks to a large number of programs written in Hangul.

second
Korean Customs - Respect



1-When drinking with a much older person, it is customary to turn your head away to take a drink. Some Koreans may feel strange about a foreigner doing so, and they will tell you if that's the case.
2-If you are smoking while walking along and you approach an older person, either hide or put out your cigarette. Korean teens that smoke typically do so in stairways and basement levels of buildings, away from adult's eyes.
3-Koreans believe that direct eye contact during conversation shows boldness, and out of politeness they concentrate on the conversation, usually avoiding eye-to-eye contact.
4-Out of respect for the elderly, young people usually give up their seats for an aged person on a crowded bus or subway train. Nowadays some young people do not but most still do. Most Koreans wouldn't expect a foreigner to do this, but if you do it will make you look like a well-mannered guest in their country.
5-Koreans shake hands and bow at the same time. The depth of the bow depends on the relative seniority of the two people.
6-When you receive something (a present, a cup, a pen, etc.) from an older person, you should use two hands when receiving it, with a bow. If it's small enough for one hand, use one hand to receive it and the other under your forearm or your lower chest (for support). When you are shaking hands with an older person, use two hands. If the person receiving the gift is younger or lower in stature, passing with one hand is acceptable.
7-Confucian tradition also demands that the elderly be treated at all times with the utmost respect. When elders are present, young Koreans would never lounge around, wear sunglasses, or expect to eat first.
8-Relationships with friends are the one area where Koreans can view each other as equals. Friends, however, really means those born the same year who are, therefore, the same age and capable of being equal.


third
Korean Food



Korean foods are definitely different from foods elsewhere in the world. The one attribute which stands out the most is spiciness. The other is that many dishes are served at room temperature(yest some are served boiling hot). Korean food has a distinctive flavor, with the use of various vegetables and spices to complement the meats. Hanjongshik (한정식) literally means "full course Korean meal" which consists of grilled fish, steamed short ribs, and multiple side dishes. The usual Korean meal is rather elaborate when served in a restaurant even if defined only by the quantity offered.

The staple of the Korean diet is kimchi (김치). It has become, through tradition and enduring style, almost a religious activity to prepare. Kimjang (김장), which occurs in the autumn harvest season, is the most important annual social event of Korea, at which time the dish is composed in great quantities. The ingredients are trucked in in huge piles. The women gather in groups to spend hours cutting, washing and salting the cabbage and white radishes. Then they are dosed with red pepper, then garlicked and pickled. The concoction is then buried in huge earthenware crocks to keep it fresh yet fermenting though the winter months. By the time comes to feast upon the final product, it is fiery hot. Some kimchi is milder, such as a light brine kimchi, usually prepared in the summer months when kimchi is difficult to retain its freshness. There is also a type of light kimchi soup, fermented water with vegetables which is usually served aside a variety of other side dishes.



2

Numerous meat dishes are available. The most popular of these is pulgogi (불고기), or "fire beef," which can be thinly sliced marinated beef, marinated ribs, unmarinated sliced beef or unmarinated sliced pork. Some call it barbecued beef, and is appreciated by many Western people. It is broiled in a convex slotted brazier with a catcher for collecting the rich juices which can be made into a delicious soup after the meal. Kalbi (갈비), steamed or broiled marinated beef or pork short ribs, is also quite popular, and is more tender than pulgogi. Shinsillo is a delicious mixture of meat, fish, vegetables and bean curd. It is served simmered in a beef broth over a charcoal broiler with a small chimney. It is also sometimes served with eggs and gingko nuts.

Pibimbap (비빔밥) is made from cooked rice mixed with bits of meat, seasoned vegetables, and egg. It is sometimes prepared with koch'ujang (고추장), a red pepper sauce. Genghis Khan is made from thin slices of beef cooked in a broth mixed with vegetables, herbs, and spices. Broiled to-mi (도미) is red snapper served with sweet and sour vegetables. Other popular dishes are takmokam, stewed chicken; sojum kui, beef pieces barbecued on an iron-hot plate then dipped in salt and pepper; and kimpap (김밥), chopped meat and vegetables wrapped in rice and dried seaweed, usually served with a bowl of soup and pickled radishes.

3

Vegetable dishes are also very popular in Korea. In fact, rice is meant to be the main course of a meal, and the additional foods are intended to enhance its flavor. Naengmyon (냉면) is a single, independent dish of cold noodles, and jajangmyon (짜장면, 자장면) is noodles with black sauce. Mandu (만두) is steamed dumplings.

Soups (국) in Korea vary in taste and potency. Maeuntang (매운탕) is a spicy, hot seafood soup that usually includes white fish, vegetables, soybean curd, red pepper powder, and a poached egg. Twoenjang-guk (된장국) is a fermented soybean paste soup with shortnecked clams in its broth. Miyok-guk (미역국) is a vegetable soup prepared with dried spinach, sliced radish, or dried seaweed. Also popular is a light broth boiled from highly seasoned dried anchovies.

The herbs and spices which give Korean meals such a delicious flavor also carry medicinal properties. Mugworts, aralia shoots, sowthistle, and shepherd's purse are eaten in the meal to help cool or warm the head and body. Additionally, kimchi is a valuable source of vitamin C.

Korean food, whether a spicy hot kimchi or a mild dish of cold naengmyon, is characteristic of Korean tradition. The serving style of multiple side dishes and at-your-table cooking creates a warm, homely feel. The long and thorough preparation makes the taste completely fill a dish, through the broth cooking and fermentation. Korean food is in a class by itself
.....


fourth
School




Korean school hours run from around 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday though Friday and until noon on Saturdays. School runs all year, with a month-long break in the summer and winter. When students finish their classes, some go to private academies (학원) for an hour or two, then home for dinner, and then back to school until 10 p.m. for study hall. Why do Korean youngsters spend so much time in school? Simply put -- the college entrance exam (입학시험). During the administration of this test, parents camp out on the playground of the high school and sing and cheer for their children.

The pressure to do well on this standardized test is so great, many students get burned out. It is not uncommon for a handful of students in each classroom to sleep. Most teachers will allow it. They see it as the student's choice to fail. Some students even carry a pillow from class to class.

After the students enter college, it is a tradition to protest in large groups against the cause of the day. Causes for demonstration range from U.S. military presence in Korea to labor rights. Every Saturday, riot police are stationed at university entrances to quell possible problems



fifth
Dating


Dating in Korea depends on individual people, but the average Korean starts dating around high school age. Due to the fact that many schools are separated by gender, some Korean youths might not kiss someone of the opposite sex until they reach college age or beyond.

On dates, it's not uncommon for youngsters to go to movies, game rooms (오락실), singing rooms (노래방), PC rooms (PC방), or video rooms (비디오방). However, video rooms tend to have a nasty reputation for being places where Koreans make out or have varying degrees of sex while viewing a movie in a semiprivate room. On a lighter note, if all goes well for a young couple, they will buy couple rings. Obviously, this displays to others that they are a couple. When the time comes, the boy will finally enter the girl's house to meet her parents. Usually Korean kids don't enter their boyfriend or girlfriend's house until they intend to get married. When parent's approval is given, an inexpensive engagement ring is bought and they hold an engagement party. In Korea the wedding ring is the expensive ring, in contrast to the customary expensive engagement ring and inexpensive wedding band of the West



sixth
Youth CultureMusic



Korean teens like music as much as any other. Weekly TV programs like Music Bank, Music Camp, and Pop Songs (인기 가요) show off the hottest music stars, some of which will only be popular for a month. At the time of this writing, 조성모, H.O.T., Baby V.O.X., and FIN.K.L. are popular musicians and groups with staying power. Male pop star 서태지 recently returned from the U.S. after 4 years on hiatus. His return caused an absolute mob at Kimpo international airport. H.O.T.'s crowds of screaming, crying teenage girls is reminiscent of the Beatles.

Korean pop music is varied in its genre. In Korea, you can listen to native ska, punk, techno, ballad, metal, industrial and rock. American pop music, as always, has numerous fans.

Music isn't limited to typical media. The popularity of digital PCS phones (hand phones) has led to the ability to download your favorite song into your phone and have it ring with that tune. This is useful since almost everyone over the age of 14 has a hand phone, and phones with similar rings are confusing, especially on the subway..




sorry it's tooooo much,,,,,,,


EDIT: This is all really good information but I just want to add a little bit about school life. In Korean schools, starting from middle school, MOST schools require you to wear a uniform and have your hair to be cut a certain length. If you don't follow these rules, you get hit by your teacher and sent home.

Also, in Korea, all healthy males have to be drafted into the military and stay there for two years (my cousin is going this winter) In the military, they create certain schedules for you to do and the schedule consists of activities such as shooting, running, and even jumping out of airplanes

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Posted 5/31/08
it's not too long. I never knew about a lot of things here and now you just taught it to me. Thanks! ^^
Posted 5/31/08 , edited 11/9/08

krngirlfolife wrote:

it's not too long. I never knew about a lot of things here and now you just taught it to me. Thanks! ^^


oh realy aren't u korean??
btw am also feel my other half in korea ...
it's okay anyway and you are so welcome,,,,,thank you
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Posted 7/28/08 , edited 7/28/08
wow....it must've took a long time to write all that stuff.. but well done ^__^*
Posted 8/3/08 , edited 8/3/08

feelfree4ever wrote:

hey every one ,,,im starting this topic because i wanna share you this information about korea...

first;
(1)Hangul story

Koreans use their own unique alphabet called Hangul. It is considered to be one of the most efficient alphabets in the world and has garnered unanimous praise from language experts for its scientific design and excellence.


Hangul was created under King Sejong during the Choson Dynasty (1393-1910). in 1446, the first Korean alphabet was proclaimed under the original name Hunmin chong-um, which literally meant "the correct sounds for the instruction of the people."

King Sejong, the creator of Hangul, is considered to be one of the greatest rulers in the history of Korea. Highly respected for his benevolent disposition and diligence, King Sejong was also a passionate scholar whose knowledge and natural talent in all fields of study astounded even the most learned experts.

During his reign, King Sejong always deplored the fact that the common people, ignorant of the complicated Chinese characters that were being used by the educated, were not able to read and write. He understood their frustration in not being able to read or to communicate their thoughts and feelings in written words.



(2)
History of Hangul - Part II

The Chinese script was used by the intelligentsia of the country, but being of foreign origin, it could not fully express the words and meaning of Korean thoughts and spoken language. Therefore, common people with legitimate complaints had no way of submitting their grievances to the appropriate authorities, other than through oral communication, and they had no way to record for posterity the agricultural wisdom and knowledge they had gained through years of experience.

King Sejong felt great sympathy for the people. As a revolutionary ruler strongly dedicated to national identity and cultural independence, he immediately searched for solutions. What he envisioned was a set of letters that was uniquely Korean and easily learnable, rendering it accessible and usable for the common people.

Thus, the Hunmin chong-um was born. In the preface of its proclamation, King Sejong states, "Being of foreign origin, Chinese characters are incapable of capturing uniquely Korean meanings. Therefore, many common people have no way to express their thoughts and feelings. Out of my sympathy for their difficulties, I have created a set of 28 letters. The letters are very easy to learn, and it is my fervent hope that they improve the quality of life of all people." The statement captures the essence of King Sejong's determination and dedication to cultural independence and commitment to the welfare of the people.

(3)
History of Hangul - Part III

When first proclaimed by King Sejong, Hunmin chong-um had 28 letters in all, of which only 24 are in use today.

A Korean syllable is divided into three parts: Ch'osong (initial consonant), chungsong (peak vowel), and chongsong (final consonant). This is the basic framework that King Sejong and the Chiphyonjon scholars adhered to when created the letters. Chongsong was not separately created and was a repetition of the ch'osong. Therefore, Hangul is the consonants and vowels.

The Korean language has a well-developed and expansive vocabulary, and therefore, it is very difficult to express fully in foreign letter.

Because of its simplicity and the rather small number of letters, Hangul is very easy to learn even by children and foreigners.

It is no coincidence that by the time they reach the ages of two or three, most Korean children are already capable of expressing their feelings and thoughts, albeit in primitive form. By the time they reach school age, most exhibit mastery of Hangul, which is indeed a rare phenomena throughout the world. This fact clearly attests to the easy learnability and accessibility of the Korean alphabet.

Throughout history, Hangul has been at the root of the Korean culture, helping to preserve its national identity and independence.

Illiteracy is virtually nonexistent in Korea. This is another fact that attests to the easy learnability of Hangul. It is not uncommon for a foreigner to gain a working knowledge of Hangul after one or two hours of intensive studying. In addition, because of its scientific design, Hangul lends itself to easy mechanization. In this age of computers into their lives without difficulties, thanks to a large number of programs written in Hangul.

second
Korean Customs - Respect



1-When drinking with a much older person, it is customary to turn your head away to take a drink. Some Koreans may feel strange about a foreigner doing so, and they will tell you if that's the case.
2-If you are smoking while walking along and you approach an older person, either hide or put out your cigarette. Korean teens that smoke typically do so in stairways and basement levels of buildings, away from adult's eyes.
3-Koreans believe that direct eye contact during conversation shows boldness, and out of politeness they concentrate on the conversation, usually avoiding eye-to-eye contact.
4-Out of respect for the elderly, young people usually give up their seats for an aged person on a crowded bus or subway train. Nowadays some young people do not but most still do. Most Koreans wouldn't expect a foreigner to do this, but if you do it will make you look like a well-mannered guest in their country.
5-Koreans shake hands and bow at the same time. The depth of the bow depends on the relative seniority of the two people.
6-When you receive something (a present, a cup, a pen, etc.) from an older person, you should use two hands when receiving it, with a bow. If it's small enough for one hand, use one hand to receive it and the other under your forearm or your lower chest (for support). When you are shaking hands with an older person, use two hands. If the person receiving the gift is younger or lower in stature, passing with one hand is acceptable.
7-Confucian tradition also demands that the elderly be treated at all times with the utmost respect. When elders are present, young Koreans would never lounge around, wear sunglasses, or expect to eat first.
8-Relationships with friends are the one area where Koreans can view each other as equals. Friends, however, really means those born the same year who are, therefore, the same age and capable of being equal.


third
Korean Food



Korean foods are definitely different from foods elsewhere in the world. The one attribute which stands out the most is spiciness. The other is that many dishes are served at room temperature(yest some are served boiling hot). Korean food has a distinctive flavor, with the use of various vegetables and spices to complement the meats. Hanjongshik (한정식) literally means "full course Korean meal" which consists of grilled fish, steamed short ribs, and multiple side dishes. The usual Korean meal is rather elaborate when served in a restaurant even if defined only by the quantity offered.

The staple of the Korean diet is kimchi (김치). It has become, through tradition and enduring style, almost a religious activity to prepare. Kimjang (김장), which occurs in the autumn harvest season, is the most important annual social event of Korea, at which time the dish is composed in great quantities. The ingredients are trucked in in huge piles. The women gather in groups to spend hours cutting, washing and salting the cabbage and white radishes. Then they are dosed with red pepper, then garlicked and pickled. The concoction is then buried in huge earthenware crocks to keep it fresh yet fermenting though the winter months. By the time comes to feast upon the final product, it is fiery hot. Some kimchi is milder, such as a light brine kimchi, usually prepared in the summer months when kimchi is difficult to retain its freshness. There is also a type of light kimchi soup, fermented water with vegetables which is usually served aside a variety of other side dishes.



2

Numerous meat dishes are available. The most popular of these is pulgogi (불고기), or "fire beef," which can be thinly sliced marinated beef, marinated ribs, unmarinated sliced beef or unmarinated sliced pork. Some call it barbecued beef, and is appreciated by many Western people. It is broiled in a convex slotted brazier with a catcher for collecting the rich juices which can be made into a delicious soup after the meal. Kalbi (갈비), steamed or broiled marinated beef or pork short ribs, is also quite popular, and is more tender than pulgogi. Shinsillo is a delicious mixture of meat, fish, vegetables and bean curd. It is served simmered in a beef broth over a charcoal broiler with a small chimney. It is also sometimes served with eggs and gingko nuts.

Pibimbap (비빔밥) is made from cooked rice mixed with bits of meat, seasoned vegetables, and egg. It is sometimes prepared with koch'ujang (고추장), a red pepper sauce. Genghis Khan is made from thin slices of beef cooked in a broth mixed with vegetables, herbs, and spices. Broiled to-mi (도미) is red snapper served with sweet and sour vegetables. Other popular dishes are takmokam, stewed chicken; sojum kui, beef pieces barbecued on an iron-hot plate then dipped in salt and pepper; and kimpap (김밥), chopped meat and vegetables wrapped in rice and dried seaweed, usually served with a bowl of soup and pickled radishes.

3

Vegetable dishes are also very popular in Korea. In fact, rice is meant to be the main course of a meal, and the additional foods are intended to enhance its flavor. Naengmyon (냉면) is a single, independent dish of cold noodles, and jajangmyon (짜장면, 자장면) is noodles with black sauce. Mandu (만두) is steamed dumplings.

Soups (국) in Korea vary in taste and potency. Maeuntang (매운탕) is a spicy, hot seafood soup that usually includes white fish, vegetables, soybean curd, red pepper powder, and a poached egg. Twoenjang-guk (된장국) is a fermented soybean paste soup with shortnecked clams in its broth. Miyok-guk (미역국) is a vegetable soup prepared with dried spinach, sliced radish, or dried seaweed. Also popular is a light broth boiled from highly seasoned dried anchovies.

The herbs and spices which give Korean meals such a delicious flavor also carry medicinal properties. Mugworts, aralia shoots, sowthistle, and shepherd's purse are eaten in the meal to help cool or warm the head and body. Additionally, kimchi is a valuable source of vitamin C.

Korean food, whether a spicy hot kimchi or a mild dish of cold naengmyon, is characteristic of Korean tradition. The serving style of multiple side dishes and at-your-table cooking creates a warm, homely feel. The long and thorough preparation makes the taste completely fill a dish, through the broth cooking and fermentation. Korean food is in a class by itself
.....


fourth
School




Korean school hours run from around 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday though Friday and until noon on Saturdays. School runs all year, with a month-long break in the summer and winter. When students finish their classes, some go to private academies (학원) for an hour or two, then home for dinner, and then back to school until 10 p.m. for study hall. Why do Korean youngsters spend so much time in school? Simply put -- the college entrance exam (입학시험). During the administration of this test, parents camp out on the playground of the high school and sing and cheer for their children.

The pressure to do well on this standardized test is so great, many students get burned out. It is not uncommon for a handful of students in each classroom to sleep. Most teachers will allow it. They see it as the student's choice to fail. Some students even carry a pillow from class to class.

After the students enter college, it is a tradition to protest in large groups against the cause of the day. Causes for demonstration range from U.S. military presence in Korea to labor rights. Every Saturday, riot police are stationed at university entrances to quell possible problems



fifth
Dating


Dating in Korea depends on individual people, but the average Korean starts dating around high school age. Due to the fact that many schools are separated by gender, some Korean youths might not kiss someone of the opposite sex until they reach college age or beyond.

On dates, it's not uncommon for youngsters to go to movies, game rooms (오락실), singing rooms (노래방), PC rooms (PC방), or video rooms (비디오방). However, video rooms tend to have a nasty reputation for being places where Koreans make out or have varying degrees of sex while viewing a movie in a semiprivate room. On a lighter note, if all goes well for a young couple, they will buy couple rings. Obviously, this displays to others that they are a couple. When the time comes, the boy will finally enter the girl's house to meet her parents. Usually Korean kids don't enter their boyfriend or girlfriend's house until they intend to get married. When parent's approval is given, an inexpensive engagement ring is bought and they hold an engagement party. In Korea the wedding ring is the expensive ring, in contrast to the customary expensive engagement ring and inexpensive wedding band of the West



sixth
Youth CultureMusic



Korean teens like music as much as any other. Weekly TV programs like Music Bank, Music Camp, and Pop Songs (인기 가요) show off the hottest music stars, some of which will only be popular for a month. At the time of this writing, 조성모, H.O.T., Baby V.O.X., and FIN.K.L. are popular musicians and groups with staying power. Male pop star 서태지 recently returned from the U.S. after 4 years on hiatus. His return caused an absolute mob at Kimpo international airport. H.O.T.'s crowds of screaming, crying teenage girls is reminiscent of the Beatles.

Korean pop music is varied in its genre. In Korea, you can listen to native ska, punk, techno, ballad, metal, industrial and rock. American pop music, as always, has numerous fans.

Music isn't limited to typical media. The popularity of digital PCS phones (hand phones) has led to the ability to download your favorite song into your phone and have it ring with that tune. This is useful since almost everyone over the age of 14 has a hand phone, and phones with similar rings are confusing, especially on the subway..




sorry it's tooooo much,,,,,,,

WOW THANKS TO UR INFO I WAS ABLE TO WRITE MY STORY SMOOTHLY BUT CAN U TELL ME WAT KIND OF JOB HAS BIG COMPANIES IN KOREA IM STUCK AT THAT POINT MY MAIN CHAR IS THE CHARMAIN OF TWO HOTELS BUT I NEED MORE BIG JOBS IN KOREA TO DEVELOPE COMPETITION NOT THE SAME THING LIKE A HOTEL SOMETHING LIKE TOUR CONPANY ETC PLEASE HELP THANK YOU




ALSO PLEASE CAN U NAME ME SOME EXSPENSIVE FOOD IN KOREA/DISHES PLEASE



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Posted 8/22/08

kimi911 wrote:


feelfree4ever wrote:

hey every one ,,,im starting this topic because i wanna share you this information about korea...

first;
(1)Hangul story

Koreans use their own unique alphabet called Hangul. It is considered to be one of the most efficient alphabets in the world and has garnered unanimous praise from language experts for its scientific design and excellence.


Hangul was created under King Sejong during the Choson Dynasty (1393-1910). in 1446, the first Korean alphabet was proclaimed under the original name Hunmin chong-um, which literally meant "the correct sounds for the instruction of the people."

King Sejong, the creator of Hangul, is considered to be one of the greatest rulers in the history of Korea. Highly respected for his benevolent disposition and diligence, King Sejong was also a passionate scholar whose knowledge and natural talent in all fields of study astounded even the most learned experts.

During his reign, King Sejong always deplored the fact that the common people, ignorant of the complicated Chinese characters that were being used by the educated, were not able to read and write. He understood their frustration in not being able to read or to communicate their thoughts and feelings in written words.



(2)
History of Hangul - Part II

The Chinese script was used by the intelligentsia of the country, but being of foreign origin, it could not fully express the words and meaning of Korean thoughts and spoken language. Therefore, common people with legitimate complaints had no way of submitting their grievances to the appropriate authorities, other than through oral communication, and they had no way to record for posterity the agricultural wisdom and knowledge they had gained through years of experience.

King Sejong felt great sympathy for the people. As a revolutionary ruler strongly dedicated to national identity and cultural independence, he immediately searched for solutions. What he envisioned was a set of letters that was uniquely Korean and easily learnable, rendering it accessible and usable for the common people.

Thus, the Hunmin chong-um was born. In the preface of its proclamation, King Sejong states, "Being of foreign origin, Chinese characters are incapable of capturing uniquely Korean meanings. Therefore, many common people have no way to express their thoughts and feelings. Out of my sympathy for their difficulties, I have created a set of 28 letters. The letters are very easy to learn, and it is my fervent hope that they improve the quality of life of all people." The statement captures the essence of King Sejong's determination and dedication to cultural independence and commitment to the welfare of the people.

(3)
History of Hangul - Part III

When first proclaimed by King Sejong, Hunmin chong-um had 28 letters in all, of which only 24 are in use today.

A Korean syllable is divided into three parts: Ch'osong (initial consonant), chungsong (peak vowel), and chongsong (final consonant). This is the basic framework that King Sejong and the Chiphyonjon scholars adhered to when created the letters. Chongsong was not separately created and was a repetition of the ch'osong. Therefore, Hangul is the consonants and vowels.

The Korean language has a well-developed and expansive vocabulary, and therefore, it is very difficult to express fully in foreign letter.

Because of its simplicity and the rather small number of letters, Hangul is very easy to learn even by children and foreigners.

It is no coincidence that by the time they reach the ages of two or three, most Korean children are already capable of expressing their feelings and thoughts, albeit in primitive form. By the time they reach school age, most exhibit mastery of Hangul, which is indeed a rare phenomena throughout the world. This fact clearly attests to the easy learnability and accessibility of the Korean alphabet.

Throughout history, Hangul has been at the root of the Korean culture, helping to preserve its national identity and independence.

Illiteracy is virtually nonexistent in Korea. This is another fact that attests to the easy learnability of Hangul. It is not uncommon for a foreigner to gain a working knowledge of Hangul after one or two hours of intensive studying. In addition, because of its scientific design, Hangul lends itself to easy mechanization. In this age of computers into their lives without difficulties, thanks to a large number of programs written in Hangul.

second
Korean Customs - Respect



1-When drinking with a much older person, it is customary to turn your head away to take a drink. Some Koreans may feel strange about a foreigner doing so, and they will tell you if that's the case.
2-If you are smoking while walking along and you approach an older person, either hide or put out your cigarette. Korean teens that smoke typically do so in stairways and basement levels of buildings, away from adult's eyes.
3-Koreans believe that direct eye contact during conversation shows boldness, and out of politeness they concentrate on the conversation, usually avoiding eye-to-eye contact.
4-Out of respect for the elderly, young people usually give up their seats for an aged person on a crowded bus or subway train. Nowadays some young people do not but most still do. Most Koreans wouldn't expect a foreigner to do this, but if you do it will make you look like a well-mannered guest in their country.
5-Koreans shake hands and bow at the same time. The depth of the bow depends on the relative seniority of the two people.
6-When you receive something (a present, a cup, a pen, etc.) from an older person, you should use two hands when receiving it, with a bow. If it's small enough for one hand, use one hand to receive it and the other under your forearm or your lower chest (for support). When you are shaking hands with an older person, use two hands. If the person receiving the gift is younger or lower in stature, passing with one hand is acceptable.
7-Confucian tradition also demands that the elderly be treated at all times with the utmost respect. When elders are present, young Koreans would never lounge around, wear sunglasses, or expect to eat first.
8-Relationships with friends are the one area where Koreans can view each other as equals. Friends, however, really means those born the same year who are, therefore, the same age and capable of being equal.


third
Korean Food



Korean foods are definitely different from foods elsewhere in the world. The one attribute which stands out the most is spiciness. The other is that many dishes are served at room temperature(yest some are served boiling hot). Korean food has a distinctive flavor, with the use of various vegetables and spices to complement the meats. Hanjongshik (한정식) literally means "full course Korean meal" which consists of grilled fish, steamed short ribs, and multiple side dishes. The usual Korean meal is rather elaborate when served in a restaurant even if defined only by the quantity offered.

The staple of the Korean diet is kimchi (김치). It has become, through tradition and enduring style, almost a religious activity to prepare. Kimjang (김장), which occurs in the autumn harvest season, is the most important annual social event of Korea, at which time the dish is composed in great quantities. The ingredients are trucked in in huge piles. The women gather in groups to spend hours cutting, washing and salting the cabbage and white radishes. Then they are dosed with red pepper, then garlicked and pickled. The concoction is then buried in huge earthenware crocks to keep it fresh yet fermenting though the winter months. By the time comes to feast upon the final product, it is fiery hot. Some kimchi is milder, such as a light brine kimchi, usually prepared in the summer months when kimchi is difficult to retain its freshness. There is also a type of light kimchi soup, fermented water with vegetables which is usually served aside a variety of other side dishes.



2

Numerous meat dishes are available. The most popular of these is pulgogi (불고기), or "fire beef," which can be thinly sliced marinated beef, marinated ribs, unmarinated sliced beef or unmarinated sliced pork. Some call it barbecued beef, and is appreciated by many Western people. It is broiled in a convex slotted brazier with a catcher for collecting the rich juices which can be made into a delicious soup after the meal. Kalbi (갈비), steamed or broiled marinated beef or pork short ribs, is also quite popular, and is more tender than pulgogi. Shinsillo is a delicious mixture of meat, fish, vegetables and bean curd. It is served simmered in a beef broth over a charcoal broiler with a small chimney. It is also sometimes served with eggs and gingko nuts.

Pibimbap (비빔밥) is made from cooked rice mixed with bits of meat, seasoned vegetables, and egg. It is sometimes prepared with koch'ujang (고추장), a red pepper sauce. Genghis Khan is made from thin slices of beef cooked in a broth mixed with vegetables, herbs, and spices. Broiled to-mi (도미) is red snapper served with sweet and sour vegetables. Other popular dishes are takmokam, stewed chicken; sojum kui, beef pieces barbecued on an iron-hot plate then dipped in salt and pepper; and kimpap (김밥), chopped meat and vegetables wrapped in rice and dried seaweed, usually served with a bowl of soup and pickled radishes.

3

Vegetable dishes are also very popular in Korea. In fact, rice is meant to be the main course of a meal, and the additional foods are intended to enhance its flavor. Naengmyon (냉면) is a single, independent dish of cold noodles, and jajangmyon (짜장면, 자장면) is noodles with black sauce. Mandu (만두) is steamed dumplings.

Soups (국) in Korea vary in taste and potency. Maeuntang (매운탕) is a spicy, hot seafood soup that usually includes white fish, vegetables, soybean curd, red pepper powder, and a poached egg. Twoenjang-guk (된장국) is a fermented soybean paste soup with shortnecked clams in its broth. Miyok-guk (미역국) is a vegetable soup prepared with dried spinach, sliced radish, or dried seaweed. Also popular is a light broth boiled from highly seasoned dried anchovies.

The herbs and spices which give Korean meals such a delicious flavor also carry medicinal properties. Mugworts, aralia shoots, sowthistle, and shepherd's purse are eaten in the meal to help cool or warm the head and body. Additionally, kimchi is a valuable source of vitamin C.

Korean food, whether a spicy hot kimchi or a mild dish of cold naengmyon, is characteristic of Korean tradition. The serving style of multiple side dishes and at-your-table cooking creates a warm, homely feel. The long and thorough preparation makes the taste completely fill a dish, through the broth cooking and fermentation. Korean food is in a class by itself
.....


fourth
School




Korean school hours run from around 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday though Friday and until noon on Saturdays. School runs all year, with a month-long break in the summer and winter. When students finish their classes, some go to private academies (학원) for an hour or two, then home for dinner, and then back to school until 10 p.m. for study hall. Why do Korean youngsters spend so much time in school? Simply put -- the college entrance exam (입학시험). During the administration of this test, parents camp out on the playground of the high school and sing and cheer for their children.

The pressure to do well on this standardized test is so great, many students get burned out. It is not uncommon for a handful of students in each classroom to sleep. Most teachers will allow it. They see it as the student's choice to fail. Some students even carry a pillow from class to class.

After the students enter college, it is a tradition to protest in large groups against the cause of the day. Causes for demonstration range from U.S. military presence in Korea to labor rights. Every Saturday, riot police are stationed at university entrances to quell possible problems



fifth
Dating


Dating in Korea depends on individual people, but the average Korean starts dating around high school age. Due to the fact that many schools are separated by gender, some Korean youths might not kiss someone of the opposite sex until they reach college age or beyond.

On dates, it's not uncommon for youngsters to go to movies, game rooms (오락실), singing rooms (노래방), PC rooms (PC방), or video rooms (비디오방). However, video rooms tend to have a nasty reputation for being places where Koreans make out or have varying degrees of sex while viewing a movie in a semiprivate room. On a lighter note, if all goes well for a young couple, they will buy couple rings. Obviously, this displays to others that they are a couple. When the time comes, the boy will finally enter the girl's house to meet her parents. Usually Korean kids don't enter their boyfriend or girlfriend's house until they intend to get married. When parent's approval is given, an inexpensive engagement ring is bought and they hold an engagement party. In Korea the wedding ring is the expensive ring, in contrast to the customary expensive engagement ring and inexpensive wedding band of the West



sixth
Youth CultureMusic



Korean teens like music as much as any other. Weekly TV programs like Music Bank, Music Camp, and Pop Songs (인기 가요) show off the hottest music stars, some of which will only be popular for a month. At the time of this writing, 조성모, H.O.T., Baby V.O.X., and FIN.K.L. are popular musicians and groups with staying power. Male pop star 서태지 recently returned from the U.S. after 4 years on hiatus. His return caused an absolute mob at Kimpo international airport. H.O.T.'s crowds of screaming, crying teenage girls is reminiscent of the Beatles.

Korean pop music is varied in its genre. In Korea, you can listen to native ska, punk, techno, ballad, metal, industrial and rock. American pop music, as always, has numerous fans.

Music isn't limited to typical media. The popularity of digital PCS phones (hand phones) has led to the ability to download your favorite song into your phone and have it ring with that tune. This is useful since almost everyone over the age of 14 has a hand phone, and phones with similar rings are confusing, especially on the subway..




sorry it's tooooo much,,,,,,,

WOW THANKS TO UR INFO I WAS ABLE TO WRITE MY STORY SMOOTHLY BUT CAN U TELL ME WAT KIND OF JOB HAS BIG COMPANIES IN KOREA IM STUCK AT THAT POINT MY MAIN CHAR IS THE CHARMAIN OF TWO HOTELS BUT I NEED MORE BIG JOBS IN KOREA TO DEVELOPE COMPETITION NOT THE SAME THING LIKE A HOTEL SOMETHING LIKE TOUR CONPANY ETC PLEASE HELP THANK YOU




ALSO PLEASE CAN U NAME ME SOME EXSPENSIVE FOOD IN KOREA/DISHES PLEASE






well Some major companies in Korea are companies like LG, Samsung, Doosan, and Lotte. The only famous Hotel name I know is Lotte Hotel

Posted 8/23/08

krnsoldierofGod wrote:


kimi911 wrote:


feelfree4ever wrote:

hey every one ,,,im starting this topic because i wanna share you this information about korea...

first;
(1)Hangul story

Koreans use their own unique alphabet called Hangul. It is considered to be one of the most efficient alphabets in the world and has garnered unanimous praise from language experts for its scientific design and excellence.


Hangul was created under King Sejong during the Choson Dynasty (1393-1910). in 1446, the first Korean alphabet was proclaimed under the original name Hunmin chong-um, which literally meant "the correct sounds for the instruction of the people."

King Sejong, the creator of Hangul, is considered to be one of the greatest rulers in the history of Korea. Highly respected for his benevolent disposition and diligence, King Sejong was also a passionate scholar whose knowledge and natural talent in all fields of study astounded even the most learned experts.

During his reign, King Sejong always deplored the fact that the common people, ignorant of the complicated Chinese characters that were being used by the educated, were not able to read and write. He understood their frustration in not being able to read or to communicate their thoughts and feelings in written words.



(2)
History of Hangul - Part II

The Chinese script was used by the intelligentsia of the country, but being of foreign origin, it could not fully express the words and meaning of Korean thoughts and spoken language. Therefore, common people with legitimate complaints had no way of submitting their grievances to the appropriate authorities, other than through oral communication, and they had no way to record for posterity the agricultural wisdom and knowledge they had gained through years of experience.

King Sejong felt great sympathy for the people. As a revolutionary ruler strongly dedicated to national identity and cultural independence, he immediately searched for solutions. What he envisioned was a set of letters that was uniquely Korean and easily learnable, rendering it accessible and usable for the common people.

Thus, the Hunmin chong-um was born. In the preface of its proclamation, King Sejong states, "Being of foreign origin, Chinese characters are incapable of capturing uniquely Korean meanings. Therefore, many common people have no way to express their thoughts and feelings. Out of my sympathy for their difficulties, I have created a set of 28 letters. The letters are very easy to learn, and it is my fervent hope that they improve the quality of life of all people." The statement captures the essence of King Sejong's determination and dedication to cultural independence and commitment to the welfare of the people.

(3)
History of Hangul - Part III

When first proclaimed by King Sejong, Hunmin chong-um had 28 letters in all, of which only 24 are in use today.

A Korean syllable is divided into three parts: Ch'osong (initial consonant), chungsong (peak vowel), and chongsong (final consonant). This is the basic framework that King Sejong and the Chiphyonjon scholars adhered to when created the letters. Chongsong was not separately created and was a repetition of the ch'osong. Therefore, Hangul is the consonants and vowels.

The Korean language has a well-developed and expansive vocabulary, and therefore, it is very difficult to express fully in foreign letter.

Because of its simplicity and the rather small number of letters, Hangul is very easy to learn even by children and foreigners.

It is no coincidence that by the time they reach the ages of two or three, most Korean children are already capable of expressing their feelings and thoughts, albeit in primitive form. By the time they reach school age, most exhibit mastery of Hangul, which is indeed a rare phenomena throughout the world. This fact clearly attests to the easy learnability and accessibility of the Korean alphabet.

Throughout history, Hangul has been at the root of the Korean culture, helping to preserve its national identity and independence.

Illiteracy is virtually nonexistent in Korea. This is another fact that attests to the easy learnability of Hangul. It is not uncommon for a foreigner to gain a working knowledge of Hangul after one or two hours of intensive studying. In addition, because of its scientific design, Hangul lends itself to easy mechanization. In this age of computers into their lives without difficulties, thanks to a large number of programs written in Hangul.

second
Korean Customs - Respect



1-When drinking with a much older person, it is customary to turn your head away to take a drink. Some Koreans may feel strange about a foreigner doing so, and they will tell you if that's the case.
2-If you are smoking while walking along and you approach an older person, either hide or put out your cigarette. Korean teens that smoke typically do so in stairways and basement levels of buildings, away from adult's eyes.
3-Koreans believe that direct eye contact during conversation shows boldness, and out of politeness they concentrate on the conversation, usually avoiding eye-to-eye contact.
4-Out of respect for the elderly, young people usually give up their seats for an aged person on a crowded bus or subway train. Nowadays some young people do not but most still do. Most Koreans wouldn't expect a foreigner to do this, but if you do it will make you look like a well-mannered guest in their country.
5-Koreans shake hands and bow at the same time. The depth of the bow depends on the relative seniority of the two people.
6-When you receive something (a present, a cup, a pen, etc.) from an older person, you should use two hands when receiving it, with a bow. If it's small enough for one hand, use one hand to receive it and the other under your forearm or your lower chest (for support). When you are shaking hands with an older person, use two hands. If the person receiving the gift is younger or lower in stature, passing with one hand is acceptable.
7-Confucian tradition also demands that the elderly be treated at all times with the utmost respect. When elders are present, young Koreans would never lounge around, wear sunglasses, or expect to eat first.
8-Relationships with friends are the one area where Koreans can view each other as equals. Friends, however, really means those born the same year who are, therefore, the same age and capable of being equal.


third
Korean Food



Korean foods are definitely different from foods elsewhere in the world. The one attribute which stands out the most is spiciness. The other is that many dishes are served at room temperature(yest some are served boiling hot). Korean food has a distinctive flavor, with the use of various vegetables and spices to complement the meats. Hanjongshik (한정식) literally means "full course Korean meal" which consists of grilled fish, steamed short ribs, and multiple side dishes. The usual Korean meal is rather elaborate when served in a restaurant even if defined only by the quantity offered.

The staple of the Korean diet is kimchi (김치). It has become, through tradition and enduring style, almost a religious activity to prepare. Kimjang (김장), which occurs in the autumn harvest season, is the most important annual social event of Korea, at which time the dish is composed in great quantities. The ingredients are trucked in in huge piles. The women gather in groups to spend hours cutting, washing and salting the cabbage and white radishes. Then they are dosed with red pepper, then garlicked and pickled. The concoction is then buried in huge earthenware crocks to keep it fresh yet fermenting though the winter months. By the time comes to feast upon the final product, it is fiery hot. Some kimchi is milder, such as a light brine kimchi, usually prepared in the summer months when kimchi is difficult to retain its freshness. There is also a type of light kimchi soup, fermented water with vegetables which is usually served aside a variety of other side dishes.



2

Numerous meat dishes are available. The most popular of these is pulgogi (불고기), or "fire beef," which can be thinly sliced marinated beef, marinated ribs, unmarinated sliced beef or unmarinated sliced pork. Some call it barbecued beef, and is appreciated by many Western people. It is broiled in a convex slotted brazier with a catcher for collecting the rich juices which can be made into a delicious soup after the meal. Kalbi (갈비), steamed or broiled marinated beef or pork short ribs, is also quite popular, and is more tender than pulgogi. Shinsillo is a delicious mixture of meat, fish, vegetables and bean curd. It is served simmered in a beef broth over a charcoal broiler with a small chimney. It is also sometimes served with eggs and gingko nuts.

Pibimbap (비빔밥) is made from cooked rice mixed with bits of meat, seasoned vegetables, and egg. It is sometimes prepared with koch'ujang (고추장), a red pepper sauce. Genghis Khan is made from thin slices of beef cooked in a broth mixed with vegetables, herbs, and spices. Broiled to-mi (도미) is red snapper served with sweet and sour vegetables. Other popular dishes are takmokam, stewed chicken; sojum kui, beef pieces barbecued on an iron-hot plate then dipped in salt and pepper; and kimpap (김밥), chopped meat and vegetables wrapped in rice and dried seaweed, usually served with a bowl of soup and pickled radishes.

3

Vegetable dishes are also very popular in Korea. In fact, rice is meant to be the main course of a meal, and the additional foods are intended to enhance its flavor. Naengmyon (냉면) is a single, independent dish of cold noodles, and jajangmyon (짜장면, 자장면) is noodles with black sauce. Mandu (만두) is steamed dumplings.

Soups (국) in Korea vary in taste and potency. Maeuntang (매운탕) is a spicy, hot seafood soup that usually includes white fish, vegetables, soybean curd, red pepper powder, and a poached egg. Twoenjang-guk (된장국) is a fermented soybean paste soup with shortnecked clams in its broth. Miyok-guk (미역국) is a vegetable soup prepared with dried spinach, sliced radish, or dried seaweed. Also popular is a light broth boiled from highly seasoned dried anchovies.

The herbs and spices which give Korean meals such a delicious flavor also carry medicinal properties. Mugworts, aralia shoots, sowthistle, and shepherd's purse are eaten in the meal to help cool or warm the head and body. Additionally, kimchi is a valuable source of vitamin C.

Korean food, whether a spicy hot kimchi or a mild dish of cold naengmyon, is characteristic of Korean tradition. The serving style of multiple side dishes and at-your-table cooking creates a warm, homely feel. The long and thorough preparation makes the taste completely fill a dish, through the broth cooking and fermentation. Korean food is in a class by itself
.....


fourth
School




Korean school hours run from around 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday though Friday and until noon on Saturdays. School runs all year, with a month-long break in the summer and winter. When students finish their classes, some go to private academies (학원) for an hour or two, then home for dinner, and then back to school until 10 p.m. for study hall. Why do Korean youngsters spend so much time in school? Simply put -- the college entrance exam (입학시험). During the administration of this test, parents camp out on the playground of the high school and sing and cheer for their children.

The pressure to do well on this standardized test is so great, many students get burned out. It is not uncommon for a handful of students in each classroom to sleep. Most teachers will allow it. They see it as the student's choice to fail. Some students even carry a pillow from class to class.

After the students enter college, it is a tradition to protest in large groups against the cause of the day. Causes for demonstration range from U.S. military presence in Korea to labor rights. Every Saturday, riot police are stationed at university entrances to quell possible problems



fifth
Dating


Dating in Korea depends on individual people, but the average Korean starts dating around high school age. Due to the fact that many schools are separated by gender, some Korean youths might not kiss someone of the opposite sex until they reach college age or beyond.

On dates, it's not uncommon for youngsters to go to movies, game rooms (오락실), singing rooms (노래방), PC rooms (PC방), or video rooms (비디오방). However, video rooms tend to have a nasty reputation for being places where Koreans make out or have varying degrees of sex while viewing a movie in a semiprivate room. On a lighter note, if all goes well for a young couple, they will buy couple rings. Obviously, this displays to others that they are a couple. When the time comes, the boy will finally enter the girl's house to meet her parents. Usually Korean kids don't enter their boyfriend or girlfriend's house until they intend to get married. When parent's approval is given, an inexpensive engagement ring is bought and they hold an engagement party. In Korea the wedding ring is the expensive ring, in contrast to the customary expensive engagement ring and inexpensive wedding band of the West



sixth
Youth CultureMusic



Korean teens like music as much as any other. Weekly TV programs like Music Bank, Music Camp, and Pop Songs (인기 가요) show off the hottest music stars, some of which will only be popular for a month. At the time of this writing, 조성모, H.O.T., Baby V.O.X., and FIN.K.L. are popular musicians and groups with staying power. Male pop star 서태지 recently returned from the U.S. after 4 years on hiatus. His return caused an absolute mob at Kimpo international airport. H.O.T.'s crowds of screaming, crying teenage girls is reminiscent of the Beatles.

Korean pop music is varied in its genre. In Korea, you can listen to native ska, punk, techno, ballad, metal, industrial and rock. American pop music, as always, has numerous fans.

Music isn't limited to typical media. The popularity of digital PCS phones (hand phones) has led to the ability to download your favorite song into your phone and have it ring with that tune. This is useful since almost everyone over the age of 14 has a hand phone, and phones with similar rings are confusing, especially on the subway..




sorry it's tooooo much,,,,,,,

WOW THANKS TO UR INFO I WAS ABLE TO WRITE MY STORY SMOOTHLY BUT CAN U TELL ME WAT KIND OF JOB HAS BIG COMPANIES IN KOREA IM STUCK AT THAT POINT MY MAIN CHAR IS THE CHARMAIN OF TWO HOTELS BUT I NEED MORE BIG JOBS IN KOREA TO DEVELOPE COMPETITION NOT THE SAME THING LIKE A HOTEL SOMETHING LIKE TOUR CONPANY ETC PLEASE HELP THANK YOU




ALSO PLEASE CAN U NAME ME SOME EXSPENSIVE FOOD IN KOREA/DISHES PLEASE






well Some major companies in Korea are companies like LG, Samsung, Doosan, and Lotte. The only famous Hotel name I know is Lotte Hotel




thanks a lot can u also tell me some expensive foods in korea?
Posted 8/26/08

kimi911 wrote:



thanks a lot can u also tell me some expensive foods in korea?


okay sis ,,here the answer of your question,,,it's not by me it's by ----junghak---- he is who helped me and gave me the answer,, here we go



if u wanna give it as a gift then most popular n expensive ones are : dried persimmons, gul-bi(it's sun dried fish but comes in a dozen or so), myun lang jjut( it's salted fish eggs, comes in an neat wooden box), most of items that i mentioned above usually comes in a gift basket/wrap.

or if it's for nite out then: kal bi(bbq ribs), bul go gi(marinated striped stakes), and raw fishes(korean sashimi), pretty much anything other than vegetable dishes in korean foods r a bit expensive.


thank you junghak
Posted 8/26/08

feelfree4ever wrote:


kimi911 wrote:



thanks a lot can u also tell me some expensive foods in korea?


okay sis ,,here the answer of your question,,,it's not by me it's by ----junghak---- he is who helped me and gave me the answer,, here we go



if u wanna give it as a gift then most popular n expensive ones are : dried persimmons, gul-bi(it's sun dried fish but comes in a dozen or so), myun lang jjut( it's salted fish eggs, comes in an neat wooden box), most of items that i mentioned above usually comes in a gift basket/wrap.

or if it's for nite out then: kal bi(bbq ribs), bul go gi(marinated striped stakes), and raw fishes(korean sashimi), pretty much anything other than vegetable dishes in korean foods r a bit expensive.


thank you junghak


thank u so much and also junghak
Posted 8/27/08
you are so welcome sis anytime....please when you guote put the text in spoiler i think it's better,,thank you,,
Posted 8/28/08

feelfree4ever wrote:

you are so welcome sis anytime....please when you guote put the text in spoiler i think it's better,,thank you,,


oh okay


Posted 9/10/08
wow i didnt know about these things o.o i will remember the respect part for when i go to korea which i have to wait a year T_T
Posted 10/22/08

sofreakinazn wrote:

wow i didnt know about these things o.o i will remember the respect part for when i go to korea which i have to wait a year T_T


hey you are so lucky,a bout recpect part it's really great you know what? BEHAVED WOMAN ALWAYS MAKE A HISTORY....
Posted 10/23/08 , edited 10/23/08
^ uhh haha ok?
&i do respect
Moderator
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Posted 10/24/08
this thread gives us a sneak peek about Korea.
thanks for sharing this.
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