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heheheh, It's Yue Ying^^ She looks more pretty in the romance of the three kingdoms than in Dynasty Warriors
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Sun Jian (155 – 191) was a military general and minor warlord during the late Eastern Han Dynasty and Three Kingdoms era in ancient China. He allied himself with Yuan Shu in 190 when warlords from eastern China formed a coalition to oust Dong Zhuo, a tyrannical warlord who held the puppet Emperor Xian in his power. Although he controlled neither many troops nor much land, Sun Jian's personal bravery and resourcefulness were feared by Dong Zhuo, who placed him among Yuan Shao, Yuan Shu and Liu Biao as the most influential men at that time. After the coalition disbanded in the next year, China fell into massive civil war. In 191, Sun Jian was killed in battle during an offensive campaign against Liu Biao.

Sun Jian was also the father of Sun Quan, one of the central figures of the Three Kingdoms era who eventually established the Eastern Wu state and declared himself its first emperor in 229, whereupon Sun Jian was given the posthumous title of Emperor Wulie

Early life and career

Born in the Fuchun Prefecture of the Wu Commandery (吳郡富春, present day Fuyang, Zhejiang), Sun Jian was said to be a descendant of the renowned military strategist Sun Tzu, author of The Art of War. He was a civil officer in his prefecture during his youth. When he was sixteen, Sun Jian travelled with his father to Qiantang (錢唐, present day Hangzhou, Zhejiang), where they came upon a band of pirates dividing up their spoils on land. Sūn Jiān jumped on shore with a sabre in hand and pointed in different directions as if commanding a detachment of soldiers to surround the pirates. Seeing this, the pirates were deceived and fled. Sun Jian pursued, and only after taking the head of every pirate did he return (or just the leader's according to some accounts). His name henceforth spread.

In 184, the Yellow Turban Rebellion led by Zhang Jiao broke out across the country. Sun Jian joined the general Zhu Jun to quell the rebellion in Yuzhou (豫州, present day southern Henan and northern Anhui) area. The soldiers fought hard, forcing the rebels to retreat to Wancheng (宛城, present day Nanyang, Henan). Sun Jian placed himself in the forefront and climbed onto the city walls alone. The rest then swarmed in and defeated the rebels.

Around this time, Bian Zhang (邊章) and Han Sui colluded with the Qiang tribes and rebelled in Liangzhou (涼州, present day western Gansu). After Dong Zhuo failed to put down the rebellion, the central government sent in his place the Minister of Works Zhang Wen (張溫), who invited Sun Jian along as an advisor. When Zhang Wen summoned Dong Zhuo to the encampment at Chang'an, Dong Zhuo procrastinated and took a long time to arrive. When he did, he showed little respect for Zhang Wen. Sun Jian then advised Zhang Wen to execute Dong Zhuo, but Zhang Wen declined as Dong Zhuo held high reputation in the west.

Hearing that a mass army had arrived, the rebels promptly surrendered. When Zhang Wen and the rest returned to the capital Luoyang, however, the court held that the army did not engage the enemy and thus no honor was accorded. Meanwhile, another local-scale rebellion broke out near Changsha and the rebels besieged the city. Sun Jian was then made governor of Changsha. Within a month upon taking up office, Sun Jian had quelled the rebellion. Meanwhile, rebellions also broke out in the neighboring commanderies of Lingling (零陵, present day Yongzhou, Hunan) and Guiyang (桂陽). Both were put down by Sun Jian, who was then enfeoffed as Marquis of Wucheng (烏程侯).

Coalition against Dong Zhuo
In 189, Emperor Ling died, leaving his young son in the care of regents Empress Dowager He and General-in-Chief He Jin. He Jin then summoned Dong Zhuo to lead troops into the capital to assist in a plot to eliminate the powerful eunuch faction. Before Dong Zhuo arrived, however, He Jin was assassinated by the eunuchs and Luoyang fell into chaos following a clash between supporters of both sides. Dong Zhuo then seized military control of the capital and deposed the young emperor for the puppet Emperor Xian. However, his tyrannical ways incurred the wrath of many and in the following year, warlords from eastern China formed a coalition against him.

Sun Jian also raised an army with ten-thousands of troops and joined Yuan Shu, one of the leaders of the coalition at Luyang (魯陽, present day Lushan County, Henan). Yuan Shu made Sun Jian the General Who Quells Rebels (破虜將軍) and governor of Yuzhou. Sun Jian then began training and preparing his troops at Luyang. A force sent by Dong Zhuo was so impressed with the strict discipline of Sun Jian's troops that they gave up the plan to attack Luyang. When Sun Jian moved out to Liangdong (梁東, east of present day Linru County, Henan), he was outnumbered by Dong Zhuo's forces. With several dozen horsemen, Sun Jian broke out of the encirclement. He took off the red felt scarf he had always been wearing and handed it to his trusted aide Zu Mao (祖茂), whom Dong Zhuo's soldiers then chased after while Sun Jian escaped. Unable to shake off his pursuers, Zu Mao then dismounted, hanged the scarf onto a half-burnt pillar, and hid himself in the tall grasses nearby. The enemies surrounded the pillar and approached cautiously till they realized they had been fooled, whereupon they retreated.

After regrouping his troops, Sun Jian pressed forward against the capital and engaged in battle against Dong Zhuo's forces at Yangren (陽人, northwest of Linru County). He scored a brilliant victory and killed the enemy commander-in-chief Hua Xiong in battle. (In the Romance of the Three Kingdoms, Hua Xiong was said to be killed by Guan Yu.) At this time, someone told Yuan Shu that if Sun Jian defeated Dong Zhuo and took over the capital, he would not be controllable anymore. The doubtful Yuan Shu then ceased the food supply to Sun Jian. Sun Jian rode the hundred odd li from Yangren to Luyang in the night to see Yuan Shu, whereupon he said to the latter, "I put myself to danger in battle, first to remove the rebel (Dong Zhuo) for the country and second to avenge the deaths of your family (Yuan Shu's family members in Luoyang had all been killed by Dong Zhuo). I have no personal grudge against Dong Zhuo. Yet you could believe slanderous talks and suspect me!" The words put Yuan Shu to shame and he immediately ordered the food supply to be delivered.

Fearing Sun Jian, Dong Zhuo then sent his general Li Jue as an emissary to seek peace and propose a marriage to cement the alliance. However, Sun Jian rejected the proposals with harsh words and carried on his campaign towards Luoyang. In late 190, his force was merely ninety li away from the capital when Dong Zhuo retreated west to Chang'an after burning Luoyang to the ground. Entering Luoyang, Sun Jian ordered his men to reseal the tombs of former emperors that were excavated by Dong Zhuo, after which he returned to Luyang. It was said in the Book of Wu (吳書) by Wei Zhao that Sun Jian found one of the emperor's jade seals in a well south of Luoyang and kept it. Later, when Yuan Shu declared himself emperor, he held Sun Jian's wife Lady Wu hostage in exchange for the seal.

Later life

In 191, Yuan Shu sent Sun Jian to attack Liu Biao in Jing Province (荆州, present day Hubei and Hunan). The defense force led by Liu Biao's subject Huang Zu was defeated by Sun Jian, who pursued the enemy across the Han River to Xiangyang. During a solo ride on the Xian Hill (峴山), Sun Jian was ambushed by Huang Zu's troops, who shot him to death with arrows. The Record of Heroes (英雄記) by Wang Can, however, claims that Sun Jian died in 193 and that he was crushed to death by boulders instead of killed by arrows while pursuing the enemy commander Lü Gong. His nephew Sun Ben collected his troops and returned to Yuan Shu, who then made Sun Ben the Inspector of Yu Province.

Sun Jian was buried in Qu'e (曲阿, present day Situ Town, Jiangsu). He was survived by five sons: Sun Ce, Sun Quan, Sun Yi, Sun Kuang and Sun Lang and one daughter, commonly named Sun Shangxiang though her real name was not recorded in official history. His legacy was first inherited by the first-born Sun Ce, who died early at twenty-four. Sun Ce was then succeeded by his younger brother Sun Quan, who eventually established Eastern Wu as a sovereign state in 222 and declared himself its first emperor in 229. Sun Jian was then given the posthumous title of Emperor Wulie.



RIP: Sun Jian (the tiger) =)
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goldenakuma wrote:

Sun Jian (155 – 191) was a military general and minor warlord during the late Eastern Han Dynasty and Three Kingdoms era in ancient China. He allied himself with Yuan Shu in 190 when warlords from eastern China formed a coalition to oust Dong Zhuo, a tyrannical warlord who held the puppet Emperor Xian in his power. Although he controlled neither many troops nor much land, Sun Jian's personal bravery and resourcefulness were feared by Dong Zhuo, who placed him among Yuan Shao, Yuan Shu and Liu Biao as the most influential men at that time. After the coalition disbanded in the next year, China fell into massive civil war. In 191, Sun Jian was killed in battle during an offensive campaign against Liu Biao.

Sun Jian was also the father of Sun Quan, one of the central figures of the Three Kingdoms era who eventually established the Eastern Wu state and declared himself its first emperor in 229, whereupon Sun Jian was given the posthumous title of Emperor Wulie

Early life and career

Born in the Fuchun Prefecture of the Wu Commandery (吳郡富春, present day Fuyang, Zhejiang), Sun Jian was said to be a descendant of the renowned military strategist Sun Tzu, author of The Art of War. He was a civil officer in his prefecture during his youth. When he was sixteen, Sun Jian travelled with his father to Qiantang (錢唐, present day Hangzhou, Zhejiang), where they came upon a band of pirates dividing up their spoils on land. Sūn Jiān jumped on shore with a sabre in hand and pointed in different directions as if commanding a detachment of soldiers to surround the pirates. Seeing this, the pirates were deceived and fled. Sun Jian pursued, and only after taking the head of every pirate did he return (or just the leader's according to some accounts). His name henceforth spread.

In 184, the Yellow Turban Rebellion led by Zhang Jiao broke out across the country. Sun Jian joined the general Zhu Jun to quell the rebellion in Yuzhou (豫州, present day southern Henan and northern Anhui) area. The soldiers fought hard, forcing the rebels to retreat to Wancheng (宛城, present day Nanyang, Henan). Sun Jian placed himself in the forefront and climbed onto the city walls alone. The rest then swarmed in and defeated the rebels.

Around this time, Bian Zhang (邊章) and Han Sui colluded with the Qiang tribes and rebelled in Liangzhou (涼州, present day western Gansu). After Dong Zhuo failed to put down the rebellion, the central government sent in his place the Minister of Works Zhang Wen (張溫), who invited Sun Jian along as an advisor. When Zhang Wen summoned Dong Zhuo to the encampment at Chang'an, Dong Zhuo procrastinated and took a long time to arrive. When he did, he showed little respect for Zhang Wen. Sun Jian then advised Zhang Wen to execute Dong Zhuo, but Zhang Wen declined as Dong Zhuo held high reputation in the west.

Hearing that a mass army had arrived, the rebels promptly surrendered. When Zhang Wen and the rest returned to the capital Luoyang, however, the court held that the army did not engage the enemy and thus no honor was accorded. Meanwhile, another local-scale rebellion broke out near Changsha and the rebels besieged the city. Sun Jian was then made governor of Changsha. Within a month upon taking up office, Sun Jian had quelled the rebellion. Meanwhile, rebellions also broke out in the neighboring commanderies of Lingling (零陵, present day Yongzhou, Hunan) and Guiyang (桂陽). Both were put down by Sun Jian, who was then enfeoffed as Marquis of Wucheng (烏程侯).

Coalition against Dong Zhuo
In 189, Emperor Ling died, leaving his young son in the care of regents Empress Dowager He and General-in-Chief He Jin. He Jin then summoned Dong Zhuo to lead troops into the capital to assist in a plot to eliminate the powerful eunuch faction. Before Dong Zhuo arrived, however, He Jin was assassinated by the eunuchs and Luoyang fell into chaos following a clash between supporters of both sides. Dong Zhuo then seized military control of the capital and deposed the young emperor for the puppet Emperor Xian. However, his tyrannical ways incurred the wrath of many and in the following year, warlords from eastern China formed a coalition against him.

Sun Jian also raised an army with ten-thousands of troops and joined Yuan Shu, one of the leaders of the coalition at Luyang (魯陽, present day Lushan County, Henan). Yuan Shu made Sun Jian the General Who Quells Rebels (破虜將軍) and governor of Yuzhou. Sun Jian then began training and preparing his troops at Luyang. A force sent by Dong Zhuo was so impressed with the strict discipline of Sun Jian's troops that they gave up the plan to attack Luyang. When Sun Jian moved out to Liangdong (梁東, east of present day Linru County, Henan), he was outnumbered by Dong Zhuo's forces. With several dozen horsemen, Sun Jian broke out of the encirclement. He took off the red felt scarf he had always been wearing and handed it to his trusted aide Zu Mao (祖茂), whom Dong Zhuo's soldiers then chased after while Sun Jian escaped. Unable to shake off his pursuers, Zu Mao then dismounted, hanged the scarf onto a half-burnt pillar, and hid himself in the tall grasses nearby. The enemies surrounded the pillar and approached cautiously till they realized they had been fooled, whereupon they retreated.

After regrouping his troops, Sun Jian pressed forward against the capital and engaged in battle against Dong Zhuo's forces at Yangren (陽人, northwest of Linru County). He scored a brilliant victory and killed the enemy commander-in-chief Hua Xiong in battle. (In the Romance of the Three Kingdoms, Hua Xiong was said to be killed by Guan Yu.) At this time, someone told Yuan Shu that if Sun Jian defeated Dong Zhuo and took over the capital, he would not be controllable anymore. The doubtful Yuan Shu then ceased the food supply to Sun Jian. Sun Jian rode the hundred odd li from Yangren to Luyang in the night to see Yuan Shu, whereupon he said to the latter, "I put myself to danger in battle, first to remove the rebel (Dong Zhuo) for the country and second to avenge the deaths of your family (Yuan Shu's family members in Luoyang had all been killed by Dong Zhuo). I have no personal grudge against Dong Zhuo. Yet you could believe slanderous talks and suspect me!" The words put Yuan Shu to shame and he immediately ordered the food supply to be delivered.

Fearing Sun Jian, Dong Zhuo then sent his general Li Jue as an emissary to seek peace and propose a marriage to cement the alliance. However, Sun Jian rejected the proposals with harsh words and carried on his campaign towards Luoyang. In late 190, his force was merely ninety li away from the capital when Dong Zhuo retreated west to Chang'an after burning Luoyang to the ground. Entering Luoyang, Sun Jian ordered his men to reseal the tombs of former emperors that were excavated by Dong Zhuo, after which he returned to Luyang. It was said in the Book of Wu (吳書) by Wei Zhao that Sun Jian found one of the emperor's jade seals in a well south of Luoyang and kept it. Later, when Yuan Shu declared himself emperor, he held Sun Jian's wife Lady Wu hostage in exchange for the seal.

Later life

In 191, Yuan Shu sent Sun Jian to attack Liu Biao in Jing Province (荆州, present day Hubei and Hunan). The defense force led by Liu Biao's subject Huang Zu was defeated by Sun Jian, who pursued the enemy across the Han River to Xiangyang. During a solo ride on the Xian Hill (峴山), Sun Jian was ambushed by Huang Zu's troops, who shot him to death with arrows. The Record of Heroes (英雄記) by Wang Can, however, claims that Sun Jian died in 193 and that he was crushed to death by boulders instead of killed by arrows while pursuing the enemy commander Lü Gong. His nephew Sun Ben collected his troops and returned to Yuan Shu, who then made Sun Ben the Inspector of Yu Province.

Sun Jian was buried in Qu'e (曲阿, present day Situ Town, Jiangsu). He was survived by five sons: Sun Ce, Sun Quan, Sun Yi, Sun Kuang and Sun Lang and one daughter, commonly named Sun Shangxiang though her real name was not recorded in official history. His legacy was first inherited by the first-born Sun Ce, who died early at twenty-four. Sun Ce was then succeeded by his younger brother Sun Quan, who eventually established Eastern Wu as a sovereign state in 222 and declared himself its first emperor in 229. Sun Jian was then given the posthumous title of Emperor Wulie.



RIP: Sun Jian (the tiger) =)


nice work XD
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"Fear the Tiger of Diang Dong!!"
~Sun Jian

I Luv it when Sun Jian says that
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Blackheart567 wrote:

"Fear the Tiger of Diang Dong!!"
~Sun Jian

I Luv it when Sun Jian says that


yea its kool when he says that
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Zhang He


Zhang He (167 – 231) was a distinguished military general under the powerful warlord Cao Cao during the late Eastern Han Dynasty and Three Kingdoms era of China. He began his military career when the Yellow Turban Rebellion erupted in 184 and subsequently served under Han Fu and Yuan Shao before defecting to Cao Cao during the Battle of Guandu. He participated in many major campaigns, including those against Yuan Tan, Zhang Lu, Ma Chao, and Liu Bei. After Cao Cao's death in 220, Zhang He was primarily engaged with defending Cao Wei against the Northern Expeditions led by Chancellor Zhuge Liang of the Kingdom of Shu. He died from an arrow wound received during an encounter with Zhuge Liang's forces in 231.

Famed for his resourcefulness that even Zhuge Liang was said to be wary of, Zhang He was considered by Chen Shou, author of the Records of Three Kingdoms, to be one of the five top generals of the Kingdom of Wei, along with Zhang Liao, Xu Huang, Yue Jin and Yu Jin. He was also said to be full of respect for Confucian scholars, and supported the measure to adopt masters of the Five Classics in Cao Pi's court.

EARLY LIFE
A local of Mao (鄚, present day Maozhou Town, Hebei), the birth year of Zhang He was not recorded. After the Yellow Turban Rebellion broke out in 184, Zhang He joined the volunteer army under Han Fu, governor of Jizhou (冀州, present day southern Hebei) to suppress the rebellion. He was appointed as a middle-ranking army commander. Although the rebellion was soon quelled, it led to the flourishing of many regional armies under the control of de facto warlords. After Emperor Ling died in 189, one such warlord from Liangzhou (涼州, present day western Gansu) named Dong Zhuo usurped power and placed in the throne the puppet Emperor Xian. Warlords from eastern China formed a coalition against Dong Zhuo in 190. The attempt did not pull through but did trigger a series of massive civil wars among the warlords themselves.

In 191, when Han Fu faced military threats from rival warlord Gongsun Zan, who was based in Youzhou (幽州, present day northern Hebei), he decided to turn over Jizhou to his ally Yuan Shao. Zhang He and his troops then came under command of the new lord. Yuan Shao promoted Zhang He to a high-ranking commanding post and charged him with defending the borders against Gongsun Zan. After he successfully defeated Gongsun Zan, Zhang He was further promoted to a junior general post.

DEFECTION TO CAO CAO
In 199, Yuan Shao defeated Gongsun Zan at the decisive Battle of Yijing and gained control of the four regions north of the Yellow River. He then turned his attention to Cao Cao, a rising warlord gaining power in Yanzhou (兗州, present day western Shandong) just south of the river. In the autumn of the next year, the two sides clashed at Guandu (官渡, northeast of present day Zhongmu County, Henan). Yuan Shao had his food supply stored at Wuchao (烏巢, southeast of present day Yanjing County, Henan), guarded by Chunyu Qiong. Zhang He advised Yuan Shao to reinforce the defense at Wuchao as Cao Cao would certainly seek to seize the food supply. However, Yuan Shao eventually took the counsel of advisor Guo Tu, who suggested concentrating forces on the base camp of Cao Cao should the latter decide to attack Wuchao.


Cao Cao indeed led a light force to attack Wuchao under the cover of the night. The food supply was lost and the massive army of Yuan Shao collapsed. The embarrassed Guo Tu then slandered Zhang He before Yuan Shao, accusing the general of taking pleasure in the defeat. The fearful Zhang He then decided to defect to Cao Cao along with colleague Gao Lan. Cao Cao was very pleased and compared Zhang He's surrender to those of Wei Zi (微子) and Han Xin (Wei Zi was an advisor to Di Xin but defected to King Wen of Zhou and contributed greatly to the founding of the Zhou Dynasty. Han Xin left Xiang Yu to join Liu Bang, who later founded the Han Dynasty.)

Henceforth, Zhang He participated in many campaigns Cao Cao waged, including a northern campaign against the heirs of Yuan Shao, a defensive campaign against Ma Chao and Han Sui, and the offensive on Zhang Lu in Hanzhong. For his achievements Zhang He was promoted to General Who Crushes Rebels (盪寇將軍) in 215 and deployed along with Xiahou Yuan to the defense of the greater Hanzhong region against invasions of Liu Bei. In 219, Xiahou Yuan was killed in the Battle of Mount Dingjun and Zhang He retreated to Yangping (陽平, northwest of Hanzhong). Xiahou Yuan's deputy Guo Huai threw his weight behind Zhang He, who then took over command of the late general's troops. According to A Brief History of Wei (魏略) by Yu Huan, although Xiahou Yuan was the overall in command of the defense force of Hanzhong, Liu Bei was really more worried about Zhang He. He was said to have expressed his disappointment that it was Xiahou Yuan instead of Zhang He who was killed in battle.

When Cao Cao received news of Xiahou Yuan's death, he personally came to Hanzhong to lead a counterattack against the enemy. Liu Bei held his position in the mountainous terrain and refused to engage in battles. Cao Cao was forced to retreat to Chang'an two months later, giving up the strategic Hanzhong. Zhang He then garrisoned his troops at Chencang (陳倉) to prevent further incursion by Liu Bei.

Zhang He is often associated with his loss to Zhang Fei while attempting to conquer Dangqu. However, after the defeat he was promoted by Cao Cao to General who Agitates Bandits - possibly because during his campaign he conquered both the Baxi and Badong commanderies

LATE LIFE
After Cao Cao died in 220, his successor Cao Pi promoted Zhang He to General of the Left (左將軍). Months later, Cao Pi forced Emperor Xian to abdicate and declared himself the first emperor of Cao Wei. Zhang He was then enfeoffed as Marquis of Mao. In 221 He was sent together with Cao Zhen to subdue the Lushui Hu (盧水胡) and Eastern Qiang raiders in Anding Commandery (安定, present day western Gansu and southern Ningxia) on the western borders of China and was victorious. After an audience with the emperor in the capital Xuchang, Zhang He, Cao Zhen and Xiahou Shang were deployed south in 222 to seize Jiangling, which was under the control of the Kingdom of Wu. Although initial attacks were successful, an epidemic breakout forced the invaders to retreat.

When Cao Pi died in 226, he was succeeded by Cao Rui. Zhang He maintained his position in the south to defend against the Kingdom of Wu. When Zhuge Liang of the Kingdom of Shu launched his Northern Expeditions against the Kingdom of Wei in 227, Zhang He was recalled to his old battlefield west of Chang'an to fend off the attack. In the next year, Zhang He scored a brilliant victory against Ma Su at the Battle of Jieting. Zhuge Liang was forced to retreat to Hanzhong and self-demote three grades to take responsibility for the loss of the strategic position. Zhang He also pacified the commanderies of Nan'an (present day location unclear), Tianshui and Anding, which were turned over to Zhuge Liang during initial attacks.

Zhang He was then sent to assist Sima Yi, who was training a naval force in Jingzhou (荆州, present day Hubei and Hunan) to prepare for an assault against the Kingdom of Wu. However, the waters of Mian River (沔水, an alternate name for Han River in ancient times) during the winter were too shallow for large ships to sail in and the attack was called off. Meanwhile, Zhuge Liang launched the second of his expeditions and attacked Chencang. Zhang He was again sent to the rescue. He correctly predicted that the enemy would retreat before he even arrived because of shortage of food supply. He was then recalled to the capital and promoted to General of Chariots and Cavalry Who Campaigns the West (征西車騎將軍).

DEATH
In 231, Zhuge Liang launched the fourth of his expeditions. Zhang He was sent to assist Sima Yi in fending off the attack. After initial victories, Zhuge Liang's army again ran short of supplies and had to retreat. Sima Yi then ordered Zhang He to give pursuit, despite Zhang He's warnings of possible ambush. Zhang He was indeed ambushed by crossbowmen as his force entered a narrow defile named Mumen Trail (木門道). An arrow struck him in his right knee and he died on the battlefield at the age of 64. He was posthumously titled Marquis Zhuang (壯侯), literally meaning the robust marquis.
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kool XD lol he looks kool wit a helmet but 2 bad they mess him up in dw6
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As dynasty warriors zhang he would say this is a thing of beauty
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very nice work in posting on zhang he info
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Cao Pi

Cao Pi (187-June 29, 226), formally Emperor Wen of (Cao) Wei courtesy name Zihuan, was born in Qiao County, Pei Commandery (modern Bozhou, Anhui). He was the second son of the Chinese politician and poet Cao Cao and was the first emperor and the real founder of Cao Wei (also known as "Kingdom of Wei"), one of the Three Kingdoms.

Cao Pi, like his father, was a poet. The first Chinese poem using seven syllables per line was the poem by Cao Pi. He also wrote over a hundred articles on various subjects.

Cao Pi was the eldest son of Cao Cao and his concubine (later wife) Princess Bian. Of all his brothers, Cao Pi was the most shrewd. Instead of studying hard or conducting military affairs, he was always in the presence of court officials in order to gain their support. He was mostly in charge of defense at the start of his career. After the defeat of Yuan Shao at Guandu, he took the widow of Yuan Shao's son Yuan Xi, Lady Zhen, as a consort, although eventually she lost his favor and was forced to commit suicide. After he became emperor, his other favorite, Guo Nüwang, became empress.

In 220, Cao Pi forced Emperor Xian to abdicate the throne and proclaimed himself emperor of Wei. Cao Pi continued his father's war against Liu Bei's Shu Han and Sun Quan's Eastern Wu but was unsuccessful. Unlike Cao Cao he concentrated most of his efforts on his home country, which prospered under his rule.

There were many internal conflicts during Cao Pi's rule. He demoted his brother Cao Zhi (who had contended with him the status as Cao Cao's heir) and had two of Cao Zhi's best friends executed. Allegedly, his younger brother Cao Xiong committed suicide out of fears for his brother, although this was undocumented in actual historical records. Cao Pi also put Yu Jin to shame for his loss to Guan Yu, which caused him to become ill and die. He further restricted the roles his other brothers had in the imperial administration; in addition, unlike princes of the Han Dynasty, under regulations established by Cao Pi, Cao Wei princes had minimal authority even in their own principalities and were restricted in many ways. Many historians attribute these heavy restrictions to how Cao Pi was jealous of Cao Zhi's literary talent and Cao Zhang's military might.

Family background and early career
Cao Pi was born in 187, to Cao Cao and one of his favorite concubines, Lady Bian. At the time of Cao Pi's birth, Cao Cao was a mid-level officer in the imperial guards in the capital Luoyang, with no hint that he would go on to the great campaigns that he would eventually carry out after the collapse of the imperial government in 190. After 190, when Cao Cao was constantly waging war, it is not known where Cao Pi and his mother Lady Bian were, or what their activities were. The lone reference to Cao Pi during this period was in 204, when he took Yuan Xi's wife Zhen Luo as his wife. (Lady Zhen gave birth to Cao Pi's oldest son Cao Rui only eight months later -- which created murmurs that Cao Rui might have been biologically Yuan Xi's son and not Cao Pi's, although the possibilities appeared farfetched.)

The immediate next reference to Cao Pi's activities was in 211, when he was commissioned to be the commander of the imperial guards and deputy prime minister (i.e., assistant to his father, who was then prime minister and in effective control of the imperial government). His older brother Cao Ang having died earlier, Cao Pi was now the oldest son of Cao Cao, and his mother Lady Bian was now Cao Cao's wife (after Cao Ang's adoptive mother, Cao Cao's first wife Lady Ding, was deposed), making Cao Pi the presumptive heir for Cao Cao.

That status, however, was not immediately made legal, and for years there were lingering doubts whom Cao Cao intended to make heir, because Cao Cao greatly favored a younger son of his, also by Lady Bian -- Cao Zhi, who was known for his literary talents; while Cao Pi was a talented poet, Cao Zhi was even higher regarded as a poet and speaker. By 215, the brothers were on the surface in concord but each having his set of associates, fighting with each other under the surface. Initially, Cao Zhi's party appeared to be prevailing, and they were successful in 216 in falsely accusing two officials supporting Cao Pi -- Cui Yan and Mao Jie. Cui was executed, while Mao was deposed. However, the situation shifted after Cao Cao received advice from his strategist Jia Xu, who concluded that changing the general rules of succession (primogeniture) would be disruptive -- using Yuan Shao and Liu Biao as counterexamples. Cao Pi was also fostering his image among the people and creating the sense that Cao Zhi was wasteful and lacking actual talent in governance. In 217, Cao Cao, who was by this point Prince of Wei, finally declared Cao Pi as his crown prince. He would remain as such until his father's death in 220.

Events of 220: inheritance of his father's position and seizure of the imperial throne
Cao Cao died in spring 220, while he was at Luoyang. Even though Cao Pi had been crown prince for several years, there was initially some confusion as to what would happen next. The apprehension was particularly heightened when, after Cao Cao's death, the Qing Province (modern central and eastern Shandong) troops suddenly deserted, leaving Luoyang and returning home. Further, Cao Zhang, whom the troops were impressed by, quickly arrived in Luoyang, creating apprehension that he was intending to seize power from his brother. Cao Pi, hearing this news at Cao Cao's headquarters at Yecheng, quickly declared himself the new Prince of Wei and issuing an edict in the name of his mother, Princess Bian, to that effect -- without confirmation from Emperor Xian of Han, of whom he was still technically a subject. After Cao Pi's self-declaration, neither Cao Zhang nor any other individual dared to act against him.

One of the first acts that Cao Pi carried out as Prince of Wei was to send his brothers, including Cao Zhang and Cao Zhi, back to their marches. Cao Pi, particularly fearful and resentful at Cao Zhi, soon had his march reduced in size and killed a number of his associates, including Ding Yi, who was chief among Cao Zhi's strategists.

In winter 220, Cao Pi finally made his move for the imperial throne, strongly suggesting to Emperor Xian that he should yield the throne. Emperor Xian did so, and Cao Pi formally declined three times (a model that would be followed by future usurpers in Chinese history), and then finally accepted, ending Han Dynasty and starting a new Wei Dynasty. The former Emperor Xian was created the Duke of Shanyang. Cao Pi posthumously honored his grandfather Cao Song and father Cao Cao as emperors, and his mother Princess Dowager Bian as empress dowager. He also moved his capital from Xu (in modern Xuchang, Henan) to Luoyang.

As emperor of Cao Wei
Failure to take advantage of the conflict between Liu Bei and Sun Quan
After news of Cao Pi's ascension (and an accompanying false rumor that Cao had executed Emperor Xian) arrived in Liu Bei's domain of Yi Province (modern Sichuan and Chongqing), Liu Bei declared himself emperor as well, establishing Shu Han. Sun Quan, who controlled the vast majority of modern southeastern and southern China, did not take any affirmative steps one way or another, leaving his options open.

An armed conflict between Liu and Sun quickly developed, because in 219 Sun had ambushed Liu's general and beloved friend Guan Yu to seize back western Jing Province (modern Hubei and Hunan), which Liu had controlled, and Liu wanted to take vengeance. To avoid having to fight on two fronts, Sun formally paid allegiance to Cao, offering to be a vassal of Cao Wei. Cao's strategist Liu Ye suggested that Cao decline -- and in fact attack Sun on a second front, effectively partitioning Sun's domain with Shu Han, and then eventually seek to destroy Shu Han as well. Cao declined, in a fateful choice that most historians believe doomed his empire to ruling only the northern and central China -- and this chance would not come again. Indeed, against Liu Ye's advice, he created Sun the Prince of Wu and granted him the nine bestowments.

Sun's submission did not last long, however. After Sun's forces, under the command of Lu Xun, defeated Liu Bei's forces in 222, Sun began to distance himself from Cao Wei. When Cao demanded Sun to send his heir Sun Deng to Luoyang as hostage and Sun refused, formal relations broke down. Cao personally led an expedition against Sun, and Sun, in response, declared independence from Cao Wei, establishing Eastern Wu. By this time, having defeated Liu, Eastern Wu's forces enjoyed high morale and effective leadership from Sun, Lu, and a number of other capable generals, and Cao's forces were not able to make significant advances against them despite several large-scale attacks in the next few years. The division of the Han empire into three states has become firmly established, particularly after Liu Bei's death in 223; his prime minister Zhuge Liang, serving as regent for his son Liu Shan, reestablished the alliance with Sun, causing Cao Wei to have to defend itself on two fronts and not being able to conquer either. Exasperated, Cao made a famous comment in 225 that "Heaven created the Yangtze to divide the north and the south."

Domestic matters
Cao Pi was generally viewed as a competent, but unspectacular, administrator of his empire. He commissioned a number of capable officials to be in charge of various affairs of the empire, employing his father's general guidelines of valuing abilities over heritage. However, he was not open to criticism, and officials who dared to cricitize him were often demoted and, on rare occasions, put to death.

Marriage and succession issues
An immediate issue after Cao Pi became emperor in 220 was who the empress would be. Lady Zhen was his wife, but had by this point long lost favor due to a variety of reasons -- chief among which was the struggle she had with a favorite concubine of Cao's, Guo Nüwang. Lady Guo used the unlikely possibility that Zhen's son Cao Rui might be biologically Yuan Xi's son to full advantage in creating conflicts between Cao Pi and Lady Zhen. Cao therefore refused to summon Lady Zhen to Luoyang after he ascended the throne but instead ordered her to remain at Yecheng, which caused Lady Zhen to be resentful. When words of her resentment reached Cao, he became angry and forced her to commit suicide. In 222, Cao created Consort Guo empress.

Empress Guo, however, was sonless. Lady Zhen's son Cao Rui was the oldest of Cao Pi's sons, but because she had been put to death and because of Cao Pi's lingering doubt as to his paternity, was not created crown prince but only the Prince of Pingyuan after Cao Pi's ascension. Cao Pi, however, did not appear to have seriously considered any other son as heir. (It might have been because the other sons were all significantly younger, although their ages were not recorded in history.) In the summer of 226, when Cao Pi was seriously ill, he finally created Prince Rui crown prince. He died soon thereafter, and Prince Rui ascended the throne.

Personal information
-Father: Cao Cao
-Mother: Empress Dowager Bian
-Wife:
--Lady Zhen Luo, mother of Cao Rui (Emperor Ming) and Princess Dongxiang (d. 221)
--Empress Guo Nüwang (created 222, d. 235)

-Major Concubines:
-- Consort Li
-- Consort Yin, mother of Prince Xie
-- Consort Liu, daughter of Emperor Xian of Han
-- Consort Liu, daughter of Emperor Xian of Han (two daughters of Emperor Xian were Cao Pi's consorts, Liu being Emperor Xian's family name)
-- Consort Pan, mother of Prince Ruí
-- Consort Zhu, mother of Prince Jian
-- Consort Chou, mother of Prince Lin
-- Consort Xu, mother of Prince Li
-- Consort Su, mother of Prince Yong
-- Consort Zhang, mother of Prince Gong
-- Consort Song, mother of Prince Yan

-Children
-- Cao Ruì, initially Prince of Pingyuan (created 222), later Crown Prince (created 226), later Emperor Ming of (Cao) Wei
-- Cao Xie, died early (unclear when), posthumously created Duke Sang of Jing (231) then Prince Ai of Zan (234)
-- Cao Ruí (note different tone than Emperor Ming), initially the Prince of Yangping (created 226), later Prince Dao of Beihai (created 232, d. 233)
-- Cao Jian, Prince Huai of Dongwuyang (created and d. 225)
-- Cao Lin, initially the Prince of Hedong (created 222), later the Prince of Guantao (created 225), later Prince Ding of Donghai (created 232, d. 249), father of Cao Mao
-- Cao Li, initially the Duke of Qin (created 221), later the Prince of Jingzhao (created 222), later Prince Ai of Yuancheng (created 225, d. 229)
-- Cao Yong, initially the Duke of Huainan (created 221), later the Prince of Huainan (created 222), later the Prince of Chen (created 223), later Prince Huai of Handan (created 225, d. 229)
-- Cao Gong, Prince Dao of Qinghe (created 222, d. 223)
-- Cao Yan, Prince Ai of Guangping (created 222, d. 223)
-- Princess Dongxiang
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dragoon919 aka guan ping, my name is boxing-tenshi, but please call me tenshi, if you dont mind i have posted the biography of guan ping on here, if you are offended by this, message me and i will delete this biography straight away and i apologize for my rudeness for not asking for your permission. also guan ping was one of my favourite and best character on dynasty warriors, with him i was able to beat lu bu (most of the time lol)

well here it the biography of guan ping



Guan Ping was the first son of the famed 3rd century military general Guan Yu and elder brother of Guan Xing. He had served a military post under Liu Bei during the Three Kingdoms era of China. Little about him could be found in historical records except that he was captured along with his father west of Maicheng (southeast of present day Dangyang, Hubei) by the forces of Sun Quan in 219. Both were promptly executed. In the 14th century historical novel Romance of the Three Kingdoms by Luo Guanzhong, Guan Ping was said to have been adopted by Guan Yu when he was seventeen (Chapter 28), as his true father requested to have him follow and assist the renowned general. Without a son then, Guan Yu took Guan Ping as his own.
Since the deification of Guan Yu in Sui Dynasty, Guan Ping along with Zhou Cang (sometimes with Liao Hua as well) would often appear at the sides of this revered Chinese deity in statues placed in temples and shrines. In portraits, the trio would often appear together as well. Guan Ping's face is traditionally painted white, is a stark contrast to Zhou Cang's coal black complexion, while Guan Yu's tends to be shades of red.

Modern references

Guan Ping appears as a playable character in the video game Dynasty Warriors 5, the second latest release in the series by Koei. He is portrayed as a youth living in the shadow of his famous father who he greatly respects and admires. Realizing how important his father is to their kingdom, Guan Ping tries desperately to follow his father's legacy. He wields an enormous sword similar in appearance to a zweihander (which he remarkably wields with only one hand) called the "Young Dragon," and dresses in a similar manner to his father. Guan Ping has strong offensive power and above-average speed although his defensive strength and combat agility are severely lacking.

In Warriors Orochi, a crossover between Dynasty Warriors and Samurai Warriors, he initially defends Shu's castle in Jing Province with Huang Zhong from the encroaching Wei/Orochi forces. He attempts to lead an assault out to the seemingly under-manned East, but is isolated and is about to be killed when he is rescued by Oda Nobunaga. He then joins Nobunaga after the battle, and is depicted as one of his closest aides throughout the game.

In Dynasty Warriors 6, his weapon is a ji or similar to Lu Bu's old halberd in the game which is called Blue Dragon Ji . He wears less armor and looks different than his father Guan Yu. His moveset is similar to that of Ling Tong's. He does not have a Musou Mode story.

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man711 aka ma chao, my name is boxing-tenshi, but please call me tenshi, if you dont mind i have posted the biography of ma chao on here, if you are offended by this, message me and i will delete this biography straight away and i apologize for my rudeness for not asking for your permission.also ma chao was one of my favourite and best character on dynasty warriors.

well here it the biography of ma chao



Ma Chao (176 – 222) was the eldest son of Ma Teng and a military general during the end of the Eastern Han Dynasty and Three Kingdoms era of China. In Luo Guanzhong's 14th century historical novel Romance of the Three Kingdoms he received the nickname "Ma Chao the Splendid" due to his elaborate armour and grand skill as a warrior. Ma Chao is remembered as one of the Five Tiger Generals of Shu Han, popularized by The Romance of the Three Kingdoms. As a Shu general he raised morale and offered more strategies than achievements in battles.

Life

Early life

Ma Chao was from Fufeng Prefecture's Maoling County; he was born of mixed blood — half Han Chinese and half Qiang. In the latter years of Emperor Ling's reign, his father, Ma Teng together with Han Sui, Bian Zhang and others built an army in Liangzhou. Later on, Ma Teng and Han Sui led their troops to Chang'an. The Han imperial court gave a title of "General who Controls the West" to Han Sui and ordered him to return to Jincheng while giving the title of "General who Conquers the West" to Ma Teng and stationed him at Mei County (in the province of Shaanxi). Later, Ma Teng attacked Chang'an but was defeated and retreated to Liangzhou. Meanwhile, Zhong Yao, who protected the pass of Guanzhong, wrote a letter to Ma Teng and Han Sui informing them of an interest in forming an alliance. Subsequently, Ma Teng and Han Sui had some disagreements and Ma Teng asked to return to the vicinity of the capital. So the Han imperial court summoned Ma Teng back and made him a Commandant of the Palace Guards.

Cao Cao recommended Ma Teng’s firstborn son, Ma Chao, to serve in office, but Ma Chao declined. Later on, however, Ma Chao became Sili Xiaowei Dujun Congshi (roughly meaning a subordinate military officer of Sili Xiaowei),and accompanied Zhong Yao to Pingyang and suppress Guo Yuan and Gao Gan. In the ensuing battle, Ma Chao was hit by an arrow on the foot, but he took a pouch, wrapped his foot in it, and continued fighting and beheaded Guo Yuan. The court made him Inspector of the Xu province, and then transferred him to be an Imperial Consultant. When Ma Teng went into the Capital, Ma Chao was made Lieutenant-General, and ordered to take over Ma Teng’s command. He also received the title of Marquis of Duting. The court also made Ma Chao’s younger brother Ma Xiu Chief Commandant of the Charioteers, and Ma Xiu’s younger brother Ma Tie Colonel of the Cavalry. All their families were sent to Ye city, but Ma Chao stayed behind.

Uprising against Cao Cao

After he took control of Ma Teng's forces, Ma Chao reconciled with Han Sui. He also contacted Yang Qiu, Li Kan, Cheng Yi and others, and started the Battle of Tong Pass. Cao Cao personally negotiated with Ma Chao and Han Sui. Ma Chao thought highly about his own ability and had planned to capture Cao Cao alive. His charges were only held back by Cao Cao’s personal bodyguard, Xu Chu. After executing Ma Chao's family in Ye for his rebellion, Cao Cao used Jia Xu's ploy to drive Han Sui and Ma Chao apart and instigated them to be suspicious of each other. Thus, their forces were annihilated and Ma Chao escaped to the west and lived among the tribes. Cao Cao pursued him to Anding when he heard about unrest in the north and ordered his troops to return. Yang Fu warned Cao Cao, "Ma Chao has the courage of Ying Bu and Han Xin, and he has the support of the Qiangs and the other tribes. If you order the army to retreat now and we don't have enough forces here, we forfeit the prefectures of Longxi."

Sure enough, Ma Chao attacked the prefectures of Longxi with the forces of the western tribes and the prefectures took their lead from him, except for the city of Jicheng. When he conquered Jicheng, Ma Chao killed the Inspector of Liangzhou, Wei Kang, occupied the city and controlled Wei Kang’s forces. He called himself the General Who Conquers the West and took over the governance of Bingzhou and the military matters of Liangzhou. The deputies who served under Wei Kang: Yang Fu, Jiang Xu, Liang Kuan, Zhao Qu and others plotted against Ma Chao. Yang Fu and Jiang Xu revolted in Licheng and Ma Chao left Jicheng to quell the uprising, but was not successful. Meanwhile, Liang Kuan and Zhao Qu closed the gates to Jicheng and Ma Chao could not return to the city. He had little choice but to seek refuge with Zhang Lu in Hanzhong.

Service under Zhang Lu

Ma Chao was unhappy with Zhang Lu because he felt Zhang Lu was not capable enough nor ambitious enough to accomplish great tasks. He would ask Zhang Lu for troops to attack Liangzhou from time to time, but was never triumphant.

Zhang Lu once thought of marrying his daughter to Ma Chao, but Wang Shang, one of Zhang Lu's officers, dissuaded him, saying "Ma Chao is full of courage but not humanity; he knows no allegiance. He can not be trusted in a relationship that calls for an interdependency." (referring to his uprising that doomed his clan). Ma Chao was deeply regretful for causing the death of his family, as on one New Year's Day, he laments with younger cousin Ma Dai: "A family of hundreds, sharing the same fate in one day. Now are there only the two of us to give greetings to each other?"

Zhang Lu grew to distrust Ma Chao more and more, and sent Yang Bo to monitor him. Ma Chao then left Zhang Lu to live with the Di people.

Service under Liu Bei

Meanwhile, Liu Bei attacked Liu Zhang in Chengdu and sent Li Kui to convince Ma Chao to join him. Ma Chao responded by killing Yang Bo and leading his men to defect to Liu Bei. When Liu Bei heard that Ma Chao was coming, he said delightedly, "I am going to get Yizhou!" He sent an envoy to greet Ma Chao. Ma Chao led his men to the north side of Chengdu, capital city of Liu Zhang. There was great fear within the city. Within ten days, Liu Zhang surrendered. Ma Chao was appointed as "General Who Pacifies the West" and put in charge of the areas of Linju as befitting a Marquis of Duting, which was the title awarded by the Han court to Ma Chao. When Liu Bei became Prince of Hanzhong, he gave Ma Chao the title of "General of the Left" . In 221, Ma Chao was appointed as "General of the Agile Cavalry" (驃騎將軍) and governor of the Province of Liang. He also received a noble title of Marquis of Lixiang.

Liu Bei wrote to Ma Chao, "I am incapable but I needed to preserve the Han dynasty. Cao Cao and his son ruined the country would be remembered by all for their sins. I am disconsolate by their wrongdoings. Our people loathed them and hope to regain the Han realm such that the Di, Qiang and Xunyu and other tribes on all corners of China will be willing to join us. You are in good esteem of the northerners and your valor is well-known there. I have an important task for you: I hope you use your great influence to govern them and be concerned about the sufferings of the people. You must show the benefits of the Han government. Be fair in your task to reward the good and punish the wrongdoers. Add to the fortunes of the Han culture and not let our people down."

Ma Chao passed away at the age of 47 in second year of Zhangwu as a result of illness. Before he died, he wrote to Liu Bei, "Most of my extended family of two hundred odd were killed by Cao Cao. Only my younger cousin Ma Dai is left. Let him continue what is left of our family. I entrust him to you. That is all I have to say."
Liu Bei gave Ma Chao the posthumous title of Marquis of Wei and his son, Ma Cheng, inherited his nobility. Ma Chao's daughter married Prince of Anping, Liu Li.

Romance of the Three Kingdoms

The main difference between the historical version and the fiction is the sequence of events and Ma Chao’s character:

• In the Romance of the Three Kingdoms, Ma Teng was executed which was why Ma Chao led an uprising. In the historical version, Ma Chao led an uprising which caused Ma Teng to be executed.
• In the Romance of the Three Kingdoms, Ma Chao was described as "brave but incapable" (Chapter 64). That does not tally with the comments of Cao Cao and Zhuge Liang, two brilliant minds of the time, who gave him high praises.
• In most versions of Romance of the Three Kingdoms, Ma Chao's life is extended to 225, after Liu Bei's death and Zhuge Liang's Southern Campaign.

Battle of Tong Pass

In 211, Cao Cao executed Ma Teng, who was a conspirator against him, along with Ma Tie. Ma Chao, seeking revenge, mobilized his forces to wage war against Cao Cao. Together with his father's sworn brother Han Sui, Ma Chao set off for Chang'an and conquered it easily. Having conquered Chang'an they advanced towards Tong Pass. Thus Cao Cao immediately dispatched Xu Huang and Cao Hong with 10,000 troops to Tong Pass and issued orders that they must refrain from engaging the enemy and defend the pass for ten days. However, on the ninth day Cao Hong could no longer put up with the insults and taunts shouted by Ma Chao and his army and therefore led a contingent of troops out of the pass to fight Ma Chao's forces without permission. Xu Huang came out to help Cao Hong but the two of them were no match for Ma Chao who successfully took the pass. Cao Cao led troops personally to recapture Tong Pass and Ma Chao defeated many of Cao Cao's top generals such as Zhang He and Yu Jin single handedly.

Ma Chao then directly attacked Cao Cao. Cao Cao, in a bid to escape, cut off his beard and threw away his robe to avoid being identified by Ma Chao's troops before being rescued by Cao Hong and Xiahou Yuan. In order to cut off Ma Chao's supplies lines, Cao Cao led troops to cross the river but Ma Chao was prepared and ambushed him instead. According to legend, if not for Xu Chu's bravery and loyalty, Cao Cao would certainly have perished there. Later Ma Chao was challenged to a duel by Xu Chu, a man of herculean strength and one leader of Cao Cao's personal bodyguards (the other being Dian Wei, who was dead at that time). Ma Chao fought with Xu Chu in a long bloody duel with no victor, and the duel was cut off by Cao Cao after he ordered his troops to advance. Back at his camp Ma Chao praised Xu Chu as a true mighty warrior with the well earned name "Mad Tiger". In the days ahead, Ma Chao harassed Cao Cao's troops and gave them no chance of setting up camps. Knowing that it would be very difficult to defeat a valiant general like Ma Chao, Cao Cao accepted his adviser Jia Xu's proposal to pretend to make peace with Ma Chao and at the same time attempt to turn Ma Chao and Han Sui against each other. Slowly the two men were driven apart. Ma Chao thought that Han Sui had collaborated with Cao Cao against him and tried to kill Han Sui, but only managed to chop off Han Sui's hand. In the ensuing confusion, Cao Cao launched an attack on his confused enemies and overcame them.

Battle of Jiameng Pass

Ma Chao, together with his cousin Ma Dai and his subordinate Pang De, escaped and later sought refuge with the warlord Zhang Lu. Later Zhang Lu sent Ma Chao to rescue Liu Zhang's Yizhou from Liu Bei's invading forces. The first encounter with Liu Bei's army was with Zhang Fei in Jiameng Pass . The two men fought like tigers for long periods on two occasions with no signs of either one gaining an upper hand. Fearing that either one would get hurt, Liu Bei consulted Zhuge Liang and they agreed that such a valiant and highly skilled general like Ma Chao would be a waste if any harm fell on him or Zhang Fei. An envoy was thus sent to persuade Ma Chao to defect over to Liu Bei, and tricks were used to make Liu Zhang distrust Ma Chao. Ma Chao, being in a fix then, switched his allegiance over to Liu Bei.
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paku aka lu meng, my name is boxing-tenshi, but please call me tenshi, if you dont mind i have posted the biography of lu meng on here, if you are offended by this, message me and i will delete this biography straight away and i apologize for my rudeness for not asking for your permission.also lu meng was one of my favourite and best character on dynasty warriors.

well here it the biography of lu meng

Lü Meng (178 - 219) was a renowned officer under Sun Quan during the Three Kingdoms period of China. He served as the commanding general in the invasion of Jing Province that led to the death of Guan Yu.

Life

Early life

Lü Meng was born in Fupo of Runan (Present-day Fuyang, Anhui) in 178. Lü Meng's family migrated south of the Yangtze River when Lü Meng was young, and he lived with his brother-in-law Deng Dang , who served under Sun Ce. When Lü Meng was 15 or 16, he would often follow Deng Dang in his expeditions against the Shanyue secretly against Deng Dang's wishes. When Deng told Lü Meng's mother about this, she was furious, but Lü Meng said: "It is difficult to survive in poverty; if we can prove ourselves through hard work, then wealth would come eventually. How can we get the tiger's cub if we don't enter the tiger's den?" Lü Meng's mother was so touched at his words that she forgave him and did not punish him.

At the time, an official despised Lü Meng for his age, and often insulted him with words like: "What can he do? His behaviour would only feed himself to the tigers." Eventually, Lü Meng could not hold his anger and slew the official. Lü Meng soon turned himself into Yuan Xiong , who pleaded with Sun Ce to spare his life. Sun Ce granted Lü Meng an audience with him, and he was very impressed with Lü Meng, so he acquitted Lü Meng of his crimes and made him an officer.

A few years later, Deng Dang died, and Zhang Zhao recommended Lü Meng to take his place. When Sun Quan succeeded Sun Ce, he planned to merge smaller troops into larger garrisons. When Lü Meng heard of this, he collected funds to decorate his troops with brilliant armour. When Sun Quan came to review his troops, he was very impressed by Lü Meng's troops and added more soldiers under Lü Meng's command, thus saving Lü Meng's men from being merged into another officer's command.

Campaigns against Huang Zu and Cao Cao

In the spring of 208, Sun Quan set out to battle his nemesis Huang Zu again in the Battle of Xiakou. Lü Meng's regiment crushed Huang Zu's vanguard, and personally killed the enemy admiral Chen Jiu . Ling Tong and Dong Xi then breached the castle wall, and Huang Zu fled. After the battle, Sun Quan deemed Lü Meng's contribution as the most significant, as Chen Jiu's death ensured Sun Quan's victory. Lü Meng was promoted and was heavily rewarded.

That same year, Lü Meng participated in the Battle of Red Cliff, where an alliance between Sun Quan and Liu Bei defeated the numerically superior forces of Cao Cao. Cao Cao retreated to the north, and left Xu Huang at Jiangling, Yue Jin in Xiangyang, and Cao Ren at Nanjun . When Sun Quan's forces invaded Nanjun, Gan Ning was sent to attack Yiling, but his forces were surrounded by a detachment of Cao Ren's forces. When Sun Quan's army received the news, most thought that they didn't have enough men to spare to save Gan Ning, but Lü Meng insisted on saving him. He presented a plan to leave Ling Tong behind to defend against the main forces of Cao Ren while the forces of Lü Meng, Zhou Yu, and Cheng Pu went to rescue Gan Ning, predicting that Ling Tong will surely hold out until the three return. Lü Meng also convinced Zhou Yu to spare 300 men to block the enemy retreat route with giant logs. When the rescue forces arrived in Yiling, they killed half of the enemy's men, causing the Cao army to retreat at night. However, their way of retreat was blocked by logs previously set up by Zhou Yu, so they all had to dismount and run to safety. The pursuing Wu army arrived at the blockade, and got themselves 300 horses abandoned by the Cao army. The Wu army morale improved greatly after, and soon they routed Cao Ren and captured Nanjun. Lü Meng was given the rank of major-general.

Cao Cao then stationed Xie Qi in Wancheng to harass Wu's boundaries. Lü Meng first requested Xie Qi to surrender, and then attacked when Xie refused. Xie Qi was defeated and retreated, but his subordinates Sun Zicai and Song Hao came to Lü Meng and surrendered with their families. Later, Lü Meng followed Sun Quan to Ruxu , and proposed to build a dock to make boarding and landings more convenient. With this, the Wu army defended their positions against the approaching Cao Cao forces, who retreated after several attempts to overcome the Wu army.

When Cao Cao retreated from Leisure Ford, he stationed Zhu Guang in Lujiang, and commanded him to develop the lands for agricultural use. Lü Meng warned Sun Quan that if the enemy food stockage in Lujiang should increase, their numbers would increase, so Sun Quan personally led a campaign to attack Lujiang. Before the battle, the generals suggested that they replenish their weapons before clashing with the enemy, but Lü Meng held a different opinion: he felt that by the time the equipments were replenished, the enemy would surely have reinforced and prepared their defenses; also, he warned that in a few days the river would return to low tide, which would make the retreat back to their ships difficult. Sun Quan agreed with Lü Meng, and had the Wu army surround the city in the morning with Lü Meng as the vanguard. With Lü Meng himself hitting the war drums, the spirited soldiers captured the city at about lunchtime. Lü Meng was given the rank Grand Administrator of Lujiang for his contributions to the battle.

Scholarship

In Jiangbiao Zhuan , it was said that Lü Meng focused entirely on martial skills until he was admonished by Sun Quan. Lü Meng used to say that military matters take away his time and he had no time to read, but Sun Quan stated that he himself had to tend to matters both big and small in his land, even so, he had the time to read and enhance himself. Lü Meng was enlightened, and started to take up scholarly pursuits with another general Jiang Qin. Soon his breadth of knowledge became so broad that even some elder Confucians could not match him, and Sun Quan was so impressed at Lü's improvements that he often used Lü Meng as a role model for his other officers.
When Lu Su took over Zhou Yu's position, he went to visit Lü Meng. Originally Lu Su viewed Lü Meng in contempt, thinking that he was a mere military man, but when Lü Meng discussed his five strategies against Guan Yu, defender of Jing Province, Lu Su was surprised. He commented, "I had previously said that you only had skills for war, but today I see you are both knowledgeable and wise, and no longer the A-Meng under Wu." To this, Lü Meng replied, "When you meet someone you have not met for three days, you should see him with a new eye." The two then became close friends, and Lu Su paid a visit to Lü Meng's mother as well.
This incident gave birth to the Chinese idioms "A-Meng under Wu" , meaning "the clueless"; and "to see with a new eye", meaning "to re-evaluate a character".

Invasion of Jing Province

In 214, Sun Quan ordered Lü Meng to take the three commanderies of southern Jing Province. With subordinate generals Xianyu Dan , Xu Zhong , and Sun Gui , Lü Meng's army of twenty thousand marched to southern Jing Province. The commanderies of Changsha and Guiyang immediately surrendered, but the remaining Lingling refused to submit. Liu Bei, who controlled Jing Province at the time, returned from Sichuan to Jing Province once he received news of Sun Quan's advance. Liu Bei ordered Guan Yu to take the three commanderies of southern Jing Province with thirty thousand men. In response, Sun Quan had Lu Su stationed in Baqiu with ten thousand to defend against Guan Yu, and ordered Lü Meng to abandon Lingling and join with Lu Su.

When Lü Meng received the order to retreat, he ignored it and did not tell his men about it. He instructed Deng Xuanzhi , a friend of Lingling's defender Hao Pu , to tell Hao Pu that Liu Bei was in a dire battle with Xiahou Yuan in Hanzhong, Guan Yu just lost to Sun Gui in Nanjun, and neither could spare men to save Lingling. When Hao Pu heard this, he became afraid and quickly surrendered to Lü Meng. When Lü Meng laughingly revealed the truth to Hao Pu, that Liu Bei and Guan Yu were both free to reinforce Lingling, Hao Pu became wrecked with guilt. Lü Meng then left Sun Jiao to guard the three freshly taken commanderies and moved his own men to reinforce Lu Su. In the end, Sun Quan and Liu Bei made peace with each other, and Lingling was returned to the command of Liu Bei.

After that, the Wu army campaigned against Cao Cao in the Battle of Hefei, but were unsuccessful. During the Wu retreat, Lü Meng and Ling Tong closely defended Sun Quan from Zhang Liao's vicious attack, thus Sun Quan was able to escape from that battle. Later, Cao Cao invaded Ruxu again, but Lü Meng defended their positions as he did the last time in Ruxu and again Cao Cao was unable to take Ruxu. Thus, Lü Meng was named as the Left Guard and the General of Tiger Prowess.

When Lu Su died, Lü Meng took over his command and became the chief strategist of Wu. Unlike his predecessor, Lü Meng believed that the Sun-Liu alliance need not be maintained and proposed the invasion of Jing Province. Sun Quan had plans to invade the Cao Cao held Xuzhou instead, but Lü Meng dissuaded him, saying that although it would be easy to take Xuzhou, it would be hard to defend Xuzhou from being retaken by Cao Cao again. When Lü Meng arrived to his post at Lukou , he maintained good relationships with the neighbouring Guan Yu on the surface.

In 219, Guan Yu attacked the Wei fortress of Fancheng while leaving troops behind to defend against a possible attack from Eastern Wu. Lü Meng then feigned illness and placed the yet unknown scholar Lu Xun in command. Hearing this, Guan Yu then relieved his defenses, thinking that an attack from Wu was unlikely. In the Battle of Fancheng, Guan Yu defeated the relieving force led by Yu Jin and accepted the surrender of several ten thousand men. To support his enhanced army, Guan Yu took the nearby Wu supply depot, which enraged Sun Quan, who decided to launch a campaign into Jing Province. Originally, he was going to have Lü Meng share command with Sun Jiao, but Lü Meng convinced him not to, saying, "If my Lord feels that (Sun Jiao) is the right man, choose him. If my lord feels I am the right man, choose me." In the end, Sun Jiao was put under his command.

Lü Meng and his men invaded Jing Province under the disguise of merchant boats and captured the province by forcing its defenders Fu Shiren and Mi Fang to surrender. Once settled in Jing Province, he treated the populace with respect and care, to the point of giving medicine to the ailing and clothes to the cold. When Guan Yu's men heard of their families' safety, they became dispirited and many surrendered to Wu. Guan Yu, having nowhere to return to, attempted to flee to Sichuan but was captured by Zhu Ran and Pan Zhang on the way. Guan Yu and his son Guan Ping were then executed by Sun Quan.

Death

After Guan Yu was executed, Lü Meng soon fell to illness. The worried Sun Quan tried to summon able doctors and taoists to heal him, even promising a heavy sum in gold for the person who could cure Lü Meng. It was said that Sun Quan was so worried he drilled a hole to peek into Lü Meng's room. If he saw Lü Meng able to eat he would hold a banquet to celebrate; but if he saw Lü Meng's health degenerating, Sun Quan could not sleep at night. Despite the efforts from Sun Quan, Lü Meng died at the age of 41. Before his death, he recommended Zhu Ran and Lu Xun to take his post.

In the historical novel Romance of the Three Kingdoms, after executing Guan Yu and reclaiming Jing Province, Sun Quan threw a feast to celebrate and recommend Lü Meng, chief planner and commander of the maneuver to capture Jing Province and Guan Yu. On the feast, however, Lü Meng was possessed by Guan Yu's spirit and seized Sun Quan. As others rushed forward to save their lord, the possessed Lü Meng swore revenge. In moments, Lü Meng collapsed onto the floor and died. The frightened Sun Quan then sent Guan Yu's severed head in a wooden box to Cao Cao, meaning to sow a discord between the Shu Han and Cao Wei.
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kenshin909 aka zhou tai, my name is boxing-tenshi, but please call me tenshi, if you dont mind i have posted the biography of zhou tai on here, if you are offended by this, message me and i will delete this biography straight away and i apologize for my rudeness for not asking for your permission.also zhou tai was one of my favourite and best character on dynasty warriors.

well here it the biography of zhou tai



Zhou Tai (d. 225), courtesy name Youping, was an officer who served the Kingdom of Wu during the Three Kingdoms era of China.

life-

He originally served as one of Sun Ce's bodyguards, alongside his former comrade in piracy Jiang Qin, but was eventually promoted to lead troops. Numerous times throughout his career, he saved Sun Quan from danger by risking his own life. He was scarred for life by saving the then-young Sun Quan from an attack of Shanyue rebels while Sun Ce was away on campaign, suffering twelve deep wounds from the battle.

Later in life, he rescued Sun Quan yet again, this time from Zhang Liao's ambush at the Battle of Hefei. After this astonishing feat, having charged enemy lines to accomplish the rescue, Sun Quan would for the rest of his living days request Zhou Tai present at his side during all major battles. The two shared a bond of friendship, and it was said that Sun Quan held none of his generals in higher regard.

When Sun Quan promoted Zhou Tai to Controller of Ruxu, the other generals would not accept Zhou Tai's command at first, citing his common background. Thus Sun Quan made a special trip to Ruxu, where during a party, he personally brought Zhou Tai wine and asked for him to remove his outer garments. Pointing at each scar, Sun Quan asked Zhou Tai the story behind it, whereupon Zhou Tai would respond with his memories of past battles. The other officers gained much respect for Zhou Tai and accepted his command.

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boxing-tenshi wrote:





WoW nice job dude for postin all these bio
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