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Here i would like the group to post real life stories about they characters or just ask me to post some thing about them. But tell me the name of your char.
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Date Masamune

First Lord of Sendai
In office
1600 – 1636
Preceded by none
Succeeded by Date Tadamune

Nationality Japanese
Spouse Date Megohime


Date Masamune (伊達 政宗, Date Masamune?) (September 5, 1567 – June 27, 1636) was a Japanese samurai of the Azuchi-Momoyama period through early Edo period. Heir to a long line of powerful daimyo in the Tohoku region, he went on to found the modern-day city of Sendai. An outstanding tactician, he was made all the more iconic for his missing eye, for which he was often called dokuganryū (独眼竜), or the "one-eyed dragon."

Background



Crest of Date clan.Date Masamune was the eldest son of Date Terumune, born in Yonezawa Castle (in modern Yamagata Prefecture). At the age of 14 in 1581 Masamune led his first campaign, helping his father fight the Sōma family. In 1584, at the age of 18, Masamune succeeded his father, Terumune, who chose to retire the position of daimyo.[2] The Date family was founded in the early Kamakura period by Isa Tomomune, who originally came from the Isa district of Hitachi Province (now Ibaraki Prefecture). The family took its name from the Date district (now Fukushima Prefecture) of Mutsu Province, which had been awarded to Isa Tomomune by Minamoto no Yoritomo, the first Kamakura shogun, for his assistance in the Minamoto-Taira War (1180–85) and in Minamoto no Yoritomo’s struggle for power with his brother, Minamoto no Yoshitsune.


The Man Masamune

Masamune is known for a few things that made him stand out from other daimyo of the time. In particular, his famous crescent-moon-bearing helmet gained him a fearsome reputation. As a child, smallpox robbed him of sight in his right eye, though it is unclear exactly how he lost the organ entirely.[3] Some sources say he plucked out the eye himself when a senior member of the clan pointed out that an enemy could grab it in a fight. Others say that he had his trusted retainer Katakura Kojūrō gouge out the eye for him.[4] Because of his missing eye, his own mother condemned him as being unfit to take over as clan leader and began favoring his younger brother as heir.[5]

The Date clan had built alliances with neighboring clans with marriages over previous generations. However, there were many disputes over the lands during 15th and 16th century. Shortly after Masamune's succession, a Date retainer named Ōuchi Sadatsuna defected to the Ashina clan of the Aizu region. Masamune declared war on the Ashina for this betrayal, but his army was halted by the Ashina general Iwashiro Morikuni, who forced Masamune to retire the campaign. Masamune took control of Obama Castle after this.

With the rise of Masamune, formerly amicable relationships were cast aside as he began to attack and conquer all of the surrounding lands, even those of his kin in Mutsu and Dewa Provinces. Shocked by his ruthlessness, a neighboring family, the Hatakeyama, desperately appealed to Date Terumune to rein in his son's military campaigns. Invited to dinner by the Hatakeyama, Terumune said that he was unable to control his son. In an unheard of act of desperation, the family kidnapped Terumune and attempted to take him back with them. Masamune, who was out hunting, received word of the kidnapping. When he and his men closed in on the kidnappers as they were about to cross a river, Terumune ordered his son's men to kill their enemy all even sacrifice Terumune. Masamune's men did as they were told and killed everyone, including Terumune.[2] Masamune continued the war and tortured and killed the families of his father's kidnappers.

After defeating the Ashina in 1589, he made Aizu domain his base of operations.

On the other hand, his relationship with his mother, Yoshi, was getting worse and worse. Yoshi insisted Masamune's resignation and succession of her second son, Kojiro. According to some historians, she tried to poison him one night while serving him dinner. Masamune consequently killed his own brother in order to come to power.[6] After this tragedy, his mother fled to her brother's home, the Mogami clan.[7]

In 1590, Toyotomi Hideyoshi seized Odawara Castle and compelled the Tohoku daimyos to participate in the campaign. Although Masamune refused Hideyoshi's demand at first, he had no choice since Hideyoshi was the virtual ruler of Japan. Masamune delayed, infuriating Hideyoshi. Expecting to be executed, Masamune, wearing his finest clothes and showing no fear, faced his angry overlord. Not wanting further trouble, Hideyoshi spared his life. After serving Hideyoshi for a time, he was given Iwatesawa castle and the surrounding lands as his home domain. Masamune moved there in 1591, rebuilt the castle, renamed it Iwadeyama, and encouraged the growth of a town at its base. Masamune stayed at Iwadeyama for 13 years and turned the region into a major political and economic center. He and his men served with distinction in the Korean invasions under Hideyoshi and, after Hideyoshi's death, he began to support Tokugawa Ieyasu — apparently at the advice of Katakura Kojuuruo.

Tokugawa Ieyasu awarded Masamune the lordship of the huge and profitable Sendai domain, which made Masamune one of Japan’s most powerful daimyo. Tokugawa had promised Masamune a one million koku domain, but, even after substantial improvements were made, the land only produced 640,000 koku, most of which was used to feed the Edo region. In 1604, Masamune, accompanied by 52,000 vassals and their families, moved to what was then the small fishing village of Sendai. He left his fourth son, Date Muneyasu, to rule Iwadeyama. Masamune would turn Sendai into a large and prosperous city.

Although Masamune was a patron of the arts and sympathized with the foreign cause, he also was an aggressive and ambitious daimyo. When he first took over the Date clan, he suffered a few major defeats from powerful and influential clans such as the Ashina. These defeats were arguably caused by recklessness on Masamune's part.

Being a major power figure of northern Japan, Masamune was naturally viewed with suspicion, as any potential rival would be viewed. Toyotomi Hideyoshi reduced the size of his land holdings after his tardiness in coming to the Siege of Odawara against Hōjō Ujimasa. Later in his life, Tokugawa Ieyasu increased the size of his lands again, but was constantly suspicious of Masamune and his policies. He was particularly suspicious of foreign missionaries, whom he perceived as a threat to his power. Because of this, he ordered the death of Padre Sotelo after his journey around the world. Although Tokugawa Ieyasu and other allies of the Date were always suspicious of him, Date Masamune for the most part served the Tokugawa and Toyotomi loyally. He took part in Hideyoshi's campaigns in Korea, and in the Osaka campaigns. When Tokugawa Ieyasu was on his deathbed, Masamune visited him and read him a piece of Zen poetry. Masamune was highly respected for his ethics; a still-quoted aphorism is, "Rectitude carried to excess hardens into stiffness; benevolence indulged beyond measure sinks into weakness."

The Letter Masamune Wrote


A patron of culture and Christianity


Replica of the galleon Date Maru, or San Juan Bautista, in Ishinomaki, Japan.

Masamune expanded trade in the otherwise remote, backwater region of Tohoku. Although initially faced with attacks by hostile clans, he managed to overcome them after a few defeats and eventually ruled one of the largest fiefdoms of the later Tokugawa shogunate. He built many palaces and worked on many projects to beautify the region. He is also known to have encouraged foreigners to come to his land. It is unlikely that Masamune himself was secretly a Christian convert. Even though he funded and promoted an envoy to establish relations with the Pope in Rome, he was likely motivated at least in part by a desire for foreign technology, similar to that of other lords, such as Oda Nobunaga. Further, once Tokugawa Ieyasu outlawed Christianity, Masamune reversed his position, and though disliking it, let Ieyasu persecute Christians in his domain. For 270 years, Tohoku remained a place of tourism, trade and prosperity. Matsushima, for instance, a series of tiny islands, was praised for its beauty and serenity by the wandering haiku poet Matsuo Bashō.

He showed sympathy for Christian missionaries and traders in Japan. In addition to allowing them to come and preach in his province, he also released the prisoner and missionary Padre Sotelo from the hands of Tokugawa Ieyasu. Date Masamune allowed Sotelo as well as other missionaries to practice their religion and win converts in Tohoku.


Replica of the galleon Date Maru, or San Juan Bautista, in Ishinomaki, Japan.Masamune's greatest achievement was funding and backing one of Japan's few journeys of far-flung diplomacy and exploration in this period. He ordered the building of the exploration ship Date Maru or San Juan Bautista, using foreign (European) ship-building techniques. He sent one of his retainers, Hasekura Tsunenaga, Sotelo, and an embassy numbering 180 on a successful voyage to establish relations with the Pope in Rome. This expedition visited such places as the Philippines, Mexico, Spain and Rome, making it the first Japanese voyage to sail around the world. Previously, Japanese lords had never funded this sort of venture, so it was probably the first successful voyage.[8] At least five members of the expedition stayed in Coria (Seville) of Spain to avoid the persecution of Christians in Japan. 600 of their descendants, with the surname Japón (Japan), are now living in Spain.

When Tokugawa government banned Christianity, Masamune had to obey this law. However, some source suggested Masamune's eldest daughter, Iroha was a Christian.

Family

Father
Date Terumune
Mother
Yoshihime, daughter of Mogami Yoshimori the daimyo of Dewa Province
Wife
Megohime, daughter of Tamura Kiyoaki owner of Miharu Castle in Mutsu Province
Children
Date Hidemune (1591–1658), first holder of the Uwajima Domain
Date Tadamune (1599–1658)
Date Munekatsu (1621–1679)
Date Munekiyo (1600–1634)
Date Munetsuna (1603–1618)
Date Munetaka (1607–1626)
Date Munesane (1613–1665)
Date Misheru(????–????)
Irohahime (1594–1661)


Shōshō
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nicely done! it has thing from hes personal life to not like mine :-(
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that ok want me 2 update urs 2
Shōshō
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lol ty but i will do it, its my char lol but its to long like this too
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i no lol so is he ur favorite? (off topic)
Shōshō
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Yes he is in DW, but in SW my fev is Nene and N. Oda, but i piked hem becaus of hes personality (off topic) lol
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nene was voted as mother of the year to the website i gave u http://koeiwarriors.co.uk
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Wow that is awsom i guess. What do they mean by mother :blink:?
Shōshō
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but talk about this on the wall not in here lol
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i have no idea did u check it out
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Ishida Mitsunari


Ishida Mitsunari (1560 - November 6, 1600) was a samurai who led the Western army in the Battle of Sekigahara following the Azuchi-Momoyama period of the 17th century. His childhood name was Sakichi.

He was born in the south of Ōmi Province (which is now Shiga prefecture), and was the second son of Ishida Masatsugu, who was a retainer for the Azai clan. The Ishida withdrew from service after the Azai's defeat in 1573. According to legend, he was a monk in a Buddhist temple before he served Toyotomi Hideyoshi, but the accuracy of this legend is doubted since it only came about during the Edo period.

Mitsunari met Toyotomi Hideyoshi when the former was still young and the latter was the daimyo of Nagahama. When Hideyoshi engaged in a campaign in the Chūgoku region, Mitsunari assisted his lord in attacks against castles like the Tottori castle and Takamatsu castle (in present-day Okayama).

After Hideyoshi seized power, Mitsunari became known as a talented financial manager due to his knowledge and skill at calculation. From 1585 onward, he was the administrator of Sakai province, a role he took together with his elder brother Ishida Masazumi. He was appointed one of the five bugyo, or top administrators of Hideyoshi's government. Hideyoshi made him a daimyo of Sawayama in Ōmi Province, a five hundred thousand koku fief (now a part of Hikone). Sawayama Castle was known as one of the best-fortified castles during that time.

Mitsunari was a leader of bureaucrats in Hideyoshi's government, and was known for his rigid character. Though had many friends, he was on bad terms with some daimyo that were known as good warriors, including Hideyoshi's relative Fukushima Masanori. After Hideyoshi's death, their conflict worsened. The central point of their conflict was the question whether Tokugawa Ieyasu could be relied on as a supporter of the Toyotomi government, whose nominal lord was the child Toyotomi Hideyori.

In 1600, the Battle of Sekigahara was fought as a result of this political conflict. Mitsunari succeeded in organizing an army led by Mori Terumoto. But the coalition following Tokugawa Ieyasu was greater, and the battle resulted in Mitsunari's defeat.

After his defeat, he sought to escape, but was caught by villagers. He was executed by a particularly brutal decapitation in Kyoto, whereby he was buried up to his shoulders in the ground and locals were invited to saw at his neck with a bamboo saw. After execution, his head, severed from his body, was placed on a stand for all the people in Kyoto to see. However, a rumor has it that after a few days, his head mysteriously disappeared. Other daimyo of the Western army, like Konishi Yukinaga and Ankokuji Ekei were also executed.

Mitsunari had three sons (Shigeie, Shigenari and Sakichi) and three daughters (only the younger girl's name is known, Tatsuko) with his wife, and another child from a mistress.
Shōshō
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Nice job, i enjoed reading it
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kool
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yggdra wrote:

Here i would like the group to post real life stories about they characters or just ask me to post some thing about them. But tell me the name of your char.


please post something about oichi...can u?
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