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Shōshō
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Posted 5/18/08

Kaileena wrote:


Blackheart567 wrote:

I wonder who married Hideyoshi first...Is it Nene or Cha-Cha?


Nene is Hideyoshis 2nd wife


So you mean, Hideyoshi and Cha-Cha's two sons are already dead when Nene Married Hideyoshi?

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Posted 5/18/08

Blackheart567 wrote:


Kaileena wrote:


Blackheart567 wrote:

I wonder who married Hideyoshi first...Is it Nene or Cha-Cha?


Nene is Hideyoshis 2nd wife


So you mean, Hideyoshi and Cha-Cha's two sons are already dead when Nene Married Hideyoshi?



wikipedia says: "Lady Chacha, was one of the most favoured concubines along with Nene of Toyotomi Hideyoshi"

That means they were his wifes at the same time.
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Posted 5/18/08

Kaileena wrote:


Blackheart567 wrote:


Kaileena wrote:


Blackheart567 wrote:

I wonder who married Hideyoshi first...Is it Nene or Cha-Cha?


Nene is Hideyoshis 2nd wife


So you mean, Hideyoshi and Cha-Cha's two sons are already dead when Nene Married Hideyoshi?



wikipedia says: "Lady Chacha, was one of the most favoured concubines along with Nene of Toyotomi Hideyoshi"

That means they were his wifes at the same time.


Oh ok, i understand now! thanks!
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Posted 5/18/08

Blackheart567 wrote:


Kaileena wrote:


Blackheart567 wrote:


Kaileena wrote:


Blackheart567 wrote:

I wonder who married Hideyoshi first...Is it Nene or Cha-Cha?


Nene is Hideyoshis 2nd wife


So you mean, Hideyoshi and Cha-Cha's two sons are already dead when Nene Married Hideyoshi?



wikipedia says: "Lady Chacha, was one of the most favoured concubines along with Nene of Toyotomi Hideyoshi"

That means they were his wifes at the same time.


Oh ok, i understand now! thanks!


No problem^^
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Posted 5/18/08
wow if it was samurai warrior she would brake hideyoshi arms n leg well thats what she said in sw2: E she said if she saw hideyoshi wit another woman she would break his arms n legs
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Posted 5/18/08

Katsunaga wrote:

wow if it was samurai warrior she would brake hideyoshi arms n leg well thats what she said in sw2: E she said if she saw hideyoshi wit another woman she would break his arms n legs


Samurai warriors 2: Empires, right? LOL
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Posted 5/18/08

Blackheart567 wrote:


Katsunaga wrote:

wow if it was samurai warrior she would brake hideyoshi arms n leg well thats what she said in sw2: E she said if she saw hideyoshi wit another woman she would break his arms n legs


Samurai warriors 2: Empires, right? LOL


yep it was funny when she said it tho XD
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Posted 5/18/08 , edited 5/18/08
Komatsuhime (Ina)
Komatsuhime (1573-March 27, 1620) was a Japanese woman of the late Azuchi-Momoyama through early Edo periods. Born the daughter of Honda Tadakatsu, she was adopted by Tokugawa Ieyasu, before marrying Sanada Nobuyuki. She is described as having been very beautiful and highly intelligent.

Komatsuhime was known in her childhood as Inahime and also Onei. After witnessing the martial prowess of the Sanada at the Battle of Ueda, she and her father were captivated by them. Tokugawa Ieyasu himself arranged for Komatsuhime to marry Sanada Nobuyuki, the Sanada lord.

In 1600, when Nobuyuki had decided to cast his lot with the Tokugawa, his father Masayuki (who had not done so) was en route to visit him at Ueda Castle, accompanied by his other son, the famed Sanada Yukimura. The two stopped at Numata Castle, where Komatsuhime was managing affairs. Masayuki relayed a message to her: "I want to see my grandchildren," and in response, the princess emerged, dressed in full battle attire, saying "Since we have parted ways in this conflict, though you are my father-in-law I cannot allow you into this castle." Masayuki and Yukimura withdrew to Shōkakuji Temple, and were surprised when they saw Komatsuhime (with her children) arrive soon after them, honoring Masayuki's wish.

After the Battle of Sekigahara, during Masayuki and Yukimura's exile, she took charge of sending them food and other daily necessities.

All in all, Komatsuhime was praised as a good wife and wise mother (ryōsai kenbo). She died in Kōnosu, Musashi Province at age 47, while en route to the Kusatsu hot spring. Nobuyuki lamented her passing, saying that "the light of my house has been extinguished." Her grave can be found there. Today, in the museum at Ueda Castle, visitors can see items that she used, including her palanquin.

Komatsuhime in fiction
In the video game Samurai Warriors 2, Komatsuhime (known as Ina in the game) is a warrior who is deeply conflicted on her reason for fighting; for peace or enjoyment. She wields a long bladed bow, and can attack in melee combat and also at range. Additionally, in the game, she is charged with one of Hattori Hanzo's accomplishment during Ieyasu's journey in Iga: escorting Anayama Nobukimi, while Hanzo escorts the lord personally. Historically, Hanzō took both tasks at once and succeeded them both.

~~~~~~~~~~
Ina is my favorite female SW character
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Posted 5/18/08

Kaileena wrote:

Komatsuhime (Ina)
Komatsuhime (1573-March 27, 1620) was a Japanese woman of the late Azuchi-Momoyama through early Edo periods. Born the daughter of Honda Tadakatsu, she was adopted by Tokugawa Ieyasu, before marrying Sanada Nobuyuki. She is described as having been very beautiful and highly intelligent.

Komatsuhime was known in her childhood as Inahime and also Onei. After witnessing the martial prowess of the Sanada at the Battle of Ueda, she and her father were captivated by them. Tokugawa Ieyasu himself arranged for Komatsuhime to marry Sanada Nobuyuki, the Sanada lord.

In 1600, when Nobuyuki had decided to cast his lot with the Tokugawa, his father Masayuki (who had not done so) was en route to visit him at Ueda Castle, accompanied by his other son, the famed Sanada Yukimura. The two stopped at Numata Castle, where Komatsuhime was managing affairs. Masayuki relayed a message to her: "I want to see my grandchildren," and in response, the princess emerged, dressed in full battle attire, saying "Since we have parted ways in this conflict, though you are my father-in-law I cannot allow you into this castle." Masayuki and Yukimura withdrew to Shōkakuji Temple, and were surprised when they saw Komatsuhime (with her children) arrive soon after them, honoring Masayuki's wish.

After the Battle of Sekigahara, during Masayuki and Yukimura's exile, she took charge of sending them food and other daily necessities.

All in all, Komatsuhime was praised as a good wife and wise mother (ryōsai kenbo). She died in Kōnosu, Musashi Province at age 47, while en route to the Kusatsu hot spring. Nobuyuki lamented her passing, saying that "the light of my house has been extinguished." Her grave can be found there. Today, in the museum at Ueda Castle, visitors can see items that she used, including her palanquin.

Komatsuhime in fiction
In the video game Samurai Warriors 2, Komatsuhime (known as Ina in the game) is a warrior who is deeply conflicted on her reason for fighting; for peace or enjoyment. She wields a long bladed bow, and can attack in melee combat and also at range. Additionally, in the game, she is charged with one of Hattori Hanzo's accomplishment during Ieyasu's journey in Iga: escorting Anayama Nobukimi, while Hanzo escorts the lord personally. Historically, Hanzō took both tasks at once and succeeded them both.

~~~~~~~~~~
Ina is my favorite female SW character


So Ina did have children*nods head nods head while holding chin*

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Posted 5/18/08 , edited 5/18/08
Kojiro Sasaki.....This will be kinda long, But It's really interesting.

History

He went by the fighting name of Ganryū ("Large Rock Flow"), which was also the name of the kenjutsu school he had founded. It is said that Kojirō studied the Chūjō-ryu style of sword fighting from either Kanemaki Jisai or Toda Seigen. Toda Seigen was a master of the kodachi. If Kojirō had indeed learned Chūjō-ryu from Seigen, he would have been his master's sparring partner. Due to his master's use of the kodachi, Kojirō used a longer katana, against him, therefore eventually excelling in its use. It was after defeating his master's younger brother that he left and founded the Ganryū. The first reliable account of his life states that in 1610, because of the fame of his school and his many successful duels, including once when he fended off three opponents with a tessen fan, Kojirō was honored by Lord Hosokawa Tadaoki as the chief weapons master of the Hosokawa fief north of Kyūshū. Sasaki later became skilled in the weilding of a nōdachi, and used one he called "The Laundry-Drying Pole" as his main weapon.

The duel with Mushashi Miyamoto

Sasaki Kojirō was a long-time rival of Miyamoto Musashi, and is considered the most challenging opponent Musashi ever faced.

There are a number of accounts of the duel, varying in most details except the essentials, such as Kojirō's defeat.

The age of Kojirō is especially uncertain - the Nitenki says that during his childhood, he
“ ...received the instruction of Toda Seigen, a master of the school of the short sword, and having been the partner of his master, he excelled him in the wielding of the long sword. After having defeated his master's younger brother he left him to travel in various provinces. There he founded his own school, which was called Ganryu. ”

The Nitenki's account initially seems trustworthy, until it goes on to give the age of Kojirō at the time of the duel as 18 years old; it is known that two years earlier he had been a head weapons master for a fief - but then that would imply he had reached such a position at the age of 16, which is extremely improbable. A further complication is that Toda Seigen died in the 1590s. This unreliability of the sources means Kojirō's age could have varied anywhere from his 20s from to as late as his 50s. Even worse, a number of scholars contend that identifying Seigen as Kojirō's teacher is a mistake, and that he was actually trained by a student of Seigen's, Kanemaki Jisai.

Apparently, the young (at the time, around 29 years old) Musashi heard of Kojirō's fame and asked Lord Hosokawa Tadaoki (through the intermediary of Nagaoka Sado Okinaga, a principal vassal of Hosokawa) to arrange a duel. Hosokawa assented, and set the time and place as 13 April 1612, on the comparatively remote island of Ganryujima of Funashima (the strait between Honshū and Kyūshū). The match was probably set in such a remote place because by this time Kojirō had acquired many students and disciples, and had Kojirō lost, they would have attempted to kill Musashi.

According to the legend, Musashi arrived more than three hours late, and goaded Kojirō by taunting him. When Kojirō attacked, his blow came as close as to sever Musashi's topknot or ponytail. He came close to victory several times until, supposedly blinded by the sunset behind Musashi, Musashi struck him on the skull with his oversized bokken (wooden sword), which was over 90 centimeters long. Musashi supposedly fashioned the long bokken, a type called a suburitō due to its above-average length, by shaving down the spare oar of the boat in which he arrived at the duel with his wakizashi (the wood was very hard). Musashi had been late for the duel on purpose in order to psychologically unnerve his opponent (a tactic used by him on previous occasions, such as during his series of duels with the Yoshioka swordsmen).

Another version of the legend recounts that when Musashi finally arrived, Kojirō shouted insults at him, but Musashi just smiled. Angered even further, Kojirō leapt into combat, blinded by rage. Kojiro attempted his famous "swallow's blade" or "swallow cut," but Musashi's oversized bokken hit Kojiro first, causing him to fall down; before Kojiro could finish his swallow cut, Musashi smashed Kojiro's left rib, puncturing his lungs and killing him. Musashi then hastily retreated to his boat and sailed away. This was Musashi's last fatal duel.

Among other things, this conventional account (drawn from the Nitenki, Kensetsu, and Yoshida Seiken's account), has some problems. Would Musashi only prepare his bokuto while going to the duel site? Could he even have prepared it in time, working the hard wood with his wakizashi? Would that work not have tired him as well? Further, why was the island then renamed after Kojirō, and not Musashi? Other texts completely omit the "late arrival" portion of the story, or change the sequence of actions altogether. Harada Mukashi and a few other scholars believe that Kojiro was actually assassinated by Musashi and his students - the Sasaki clan apparently was a political obstacle to Lord Hosokawa, and defeating Kojirō would be a political setback to his religious and political foes.

The debate still rages today as to whether or not Musashi cheated in order to win that fateful duel or merely used the environment to his advantage. Another theory is that Musashi timed the hour of his arrival to match the turning of the tide. He expected to be pursued by Sasaki's supporters in the event of a victory. The tide carried him to the island then it turned by the time the fight ended. Musashi immediately jumped back in his boat and his flight was thus helped by the tide.

The Swallow cut!

His favorite technique was both respected and feared throughout feudal Japan. It was called the "Turning Swallow Cut" or "Tsubame Gaeshi" , and was so named because it mimicked the motion of a swallow's tail during flight as observed at Kintaibashi Bridge in Iwakuni. This cut was reputedly so quick and precise that it could strike down a bird in mid-flight. There are no direct descriptions of the technique, but it was compared to two other techniques current at the time: the Itto-ryu's Kinshi Cho Ohken and the Ganryū Kosetsu To; respectively the two involved fierce and swift cuts downward and then immediately upwards. Hence, the "Turning Swallow Cut" has been reconstructed as a technique involving striking downward from above and then instantly striking again in an upward motion from below. The strike's second phase could be from below toward the rear and then upward at an angle, like an eagle climbing again after swooping down on its prey.
. . . . . In my opinion, The move of Kojiro Sasaki(R1+square) is the Swallow cut...In my opinion

Kojiro Sasaki was one of my fave characters back then....but I like Kotaro Fuma more.
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Posted 5/19/08
cool kojiro the vampire dude thingy right
Shōshō
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Posted 5/19/08

Katsunaga wrote:

cool kojiro the vampire dude thingy right


Yup, He is the Vampire dude
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Posted 5/19/08
o just making sure u no he looks alot like zhang he
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Posted 5/19/08
Kojiro and Mitsuhide looks like Zhang He...umm...Why is your status offline when you online?
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o cause i put it like so other plp wont mssage me or talk 2 me unless i talk 2 them
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