Post Reply Middle Eastern Recipes
Posted 5/13/08 , edited 5/13/08
Mujaddarah

Ok, I will start off with Mujaddarah (sometimes spelled other ways like Mjaddrah).

There are really several versions of this and no "one true way" to make it. Some versions contain some meat and some don't. Some have the heck cooked out of them by frying and others are more like boiled beans and rice. Sometimes bulgur wheat is used instead of rice (Syrian, for example). Different spices are also used in different cultures' versions. I think the only real constants are they they have either rice or bulgar wheat, lentils, oilive oil, and probably all versions have some onion.

Mujaddarah is basically a "poor person's" food, the sort of thing people eat when they can't afford meat. So I think it can kind of be looked down on as "low cuisine" in this capacity.

Below is the recipe for a traditional Arab version which is either browned or blackened by frying and uses a LOT of olive oil. (Remember this often would have to take the place of meat.)

1 cup uncooked brown lentils
1-2 cups cooked rice
Between 1/2 and 1 cup olive oil
4 or so small onions
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp pepper
1 tbsp or so wheat flour
1-2 cups plain yoghurt.

Cook some rice however you normally cook it, or use leftover rice. While that's cooking, boil some brown lentils (they don't need to soak) until they get soft enough to be edible, but still kind of firm and not mushy. Drain the lentils using a strainer or something so that you're left with drained cooked lentils.

Cut up one small onion into little pieces. Put the olive oil in a pan and cook the onion on low temperature until it gets brown. NOTE that olive oil has a low smoke point so you need to keep the burner turned down pretty low and just give the onions time to cook.

Once the onions are getting brown throw the lentils, rice, salt, and pepper into the pan and turn the burner up some. Fry this mixture until it all gets brown or black. It may get so black that it looks inedible but it isn't. With all that olive oil it will be really oily and this is normal. You might want to experiment with the amount of rice and lentils but I think you generally want more lentils than rice.

Once your satisfied with how dark the Mujaddarah is looking, put it on a plate.

Chop the remaining onions up into thin strips and toss them up in a bowl. Add the wheat flour and mix it up so that it's coating all the onions evenly. (I'm not sure if 1 tbsp is the right amount. You might need more or less.)

Wipe the pan out with a paper towel or something (doesn't need to be perfectly clean but you probably want to get most particles out of it) and put a little olive oil in it. Cook the onions until they're well carmalized. The flour should help make them a little more brown and crispy. Dump the onions on top of the Mujaddrah.

Serve this with plain yoghurt, or without. If the Mujaddrah is especially black then the yoghurt will go especially well with the burned taste.



So why make it so black? My theory is that this adds extra flavor when people don't have lots of fancy spices. Even with just salt, onions, and black pepper it has plenty of flavor this way. Blackening it is like poor man's seasoning!

Here are some recipes for lighter (less oil) and less blackened versions of this dish:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QE5gXYvBoTE (from LOST-N-PAIN)
http://www.andreasrecipes.com/2006/02/09/mujaddarah/
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Posted 5/16/08
huh????????..........looks yummy.........
Posted 5/20/08
Well, it's not for everyone but you really don't have to cook it like crazy like I did.
Posted 10/14/08
BABA GHANNOUJ (eggplant dip)

1 large round eggplant (aubergine)
2 or 3 cloves of garlic
60 milliliters (3 oz., 4 Tbs.) tahina
60 milliliters (2 oz., 4 Tbs.) lemon juice
salt, red pepper
olive oil
chopped parsley
slices of red bell pepper to garnish
Cook the eggplant in a hot oven or on a fork over the flame of a gas stove. When it is well cooked through and the skin is blackened, douse with cold water, peel and chop into small pieces. Mash two or three cloves of garlic to a paste with about the same volume of salt. Add eggplant, mash to a smooth consistency and blend the tahina and lemon juice to make the Arab version of this dish; omit the tahina for the Turkish version. Serve in a bowl with little olive oil on top and garnish chopped parsley, red pepper slices and a dusting of red pepper. Serves five


Posted 11/6/08

wrote:

Mujaddarah

Ok, I will start off with Mujaddarah (sometimes spelled other ways like Mjaddrah).

There are really several versions of this and no "one true way" to make it. Some versions contain some meat and some don't. Some have the heck cooked out of them by frying and others are more like boiled beans and rice. Sometimes bulgur wheat is used instead of rice (Syrian, for example). Different spices are also used in different cultures' versions. I think the only real constants are they they have either rice or bulgar wheat, lentils, oilive oil, and probably all versions have some onion.

Mujaddarah is basically a "poor person's" food, the sort of thing people eat when they can't afford meat. So I think it can kind of be looked down on as "low cuisine" in this capacity.

Below is the recipe for a traditional Arab version which is either browned or blackened by frying and uses a LOT of olive oil. (Remember this often would have to take the place of meat.)

1 cup uncooked brown lentils
1-2 cups cooked rice
Between 1/2 and 1 cup olive oil
4 or so small onions
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp pepper
1 tbsp or so wheat flour
1-2 cups plain yoghurt.

Cook some rice however you normally cook it, or use leftover rice. While that's cooking, boil some brown lentils (they don't need to soak) until they get soft enough to be edible, but still kind of firm and not mushy. Drain the lentils using a strainer or something so that you're left with drained cooked lentils.

Cut up one small onion into little pieces. Put the olive oil in a pan and cook the onion on low temperature until it gets brown. NOTE that olive oil has a low smoke point so you need to keep the burner turned down pretty low and just give the onions time to cook.

Once the onions are getting brown throw the lentils, rice, salt, and pepper into the pan and turn the burner up some. Fry this mixture until it all gets brown or black. It may get so black that it looks inedible but it isn't. With all that olive oil it will be really oily and this is normal. You might want to experiment with the amount of rice and lentils but I think you generally want more lentils than rice.

Once your satisfied with how dark the Mujaddarah is looking, put it on a plate.

Chop the remaining onions up into thin strips and toss them up in a bowl. Add the wheat flour and mix it up so that it's coating all the onions evenly. (I'm not sure if 1 tbsp is the right amount. You might need more or less.)

Wipe the pan out with a paper towel or something (doesn't need to be perfectly clean but you probably want to get most particles out of it) and put a little olive oil in it. Cook the onions until they're well carmalized. The flour should help make them a little more brown and crispy. Dump the onions on top of the Mujaddrah.

Serve this with plain yoghurt, or without. If the Mujaddrah is especially black then the yoghurt will go especially well with the burned taste.



So why make it so black? My theory is that this adds extra flavor when people don't have lots of fancy spices. Even with just salt, onions, and black pepper it has plenty of flavor this way. Blackening it is like poor man's seasoning!

Here are some recipes for lighter (less oil) and less blackened versions of this dish:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QE5gXYvBoTE (from LOST-N-PAIN)
http://www.andreasrecipes.com/2006/02/09/mujaddarah/



So thats why i never heard of it cuse im rich im not a poor person

Posted 11/6/08

mr_kartoon wrote:

BABA GHANNOUJ (eggplant dip)

1 large round eggplant (aubergine)
2 or 3 cloves of garlic
60 milliliters (3 oz., 4 Tbs.) tahina
60 milliliters (2 oz., 4 Tbs.) lemon juice
salt, red pepper
olive oil
chopped parsley
slices of red bell pepper to garnish
Cook the eggplant in a hot oven or on a fork over the flame of a gas stove. When it is well cooked through and the skin is blackened, douse with cold water, peel and chop into small pieces. Mash two or three cloves of garlic to a paste with about the same volume of salt. Add eggplant, mash to a smooth consistency and blend the tahina and lemon juice to make the Arab version of this dish; omit the tahina for the Turkish version. Serve in a bowl with little olive oil on top and garnish chopped parsley, red pepper slices and a dusting of red pepper. Serves five





I LOVE THAT DISH!!

Posted 11/6/08
INGREDIENTS
1 pound lean ground lamb
1 1/2 cups finely chopped onion
1/2 cup chopped green bell pepper
1 teaspoon minced garlic
1 (14.5 ounce) can peeled and diced tomatoes
1 (6 ounce) can tomato paste
1/2 cup chopped fresh Italian parsley
1 teaspoon chopped fresh basil
1 tablespoon chopped fresh mint leaves
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1 pinch cayenne pepper (optional)
4 pita breads, or fluffy tortillas

DIRECTIONS
Place ground lamb in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Cook and break into small pieces until mostly browned. Drain any excess grease. Add the onion, green pepper, and garlic. Cook until onion is translucent. Stir in diced tomatoes and tomato paste, then season with parsley, basil, mint, cumin, and if using, cayenne. Simmer for about 5 minutes. Remove from heat, cover, and refrigerate overnight to blend the flavors.
Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F (230 degrees C). Distribute the lamb mixture evenly over the tortillas, and spread out to the edges. Place the tortillas onto a baking sheet.
Bake for about 20 minutes in the preheated oven. Remove from the oven and place the lahmahjoons onto a large piece of aluminum foil so that two of them are meat side to meat side, then stack the pairs together, and bring the foil up over the top to keep warm. These can be served hot or cold. Cut into small wedges.
Posted 11/10/08
Mahshi Kousa
(Stuffed Zuccini )




2 1/2 lbs. Zuccini
1/4 cup Lean ground meat
1 cup Rice
Salt, pepper, cinnamon
4 Peeled, chopped, seeded, medium size tomatoes
16 oz. Tomato sauce
Shortening

Clean the zuccini. Cut one end and make a hole through the zuccini, leaving 1/4 inch at the end, taking all the seeds from inside.

Mix meat, rinsed and drained rice, dash of salt, pepper and cinnamon, and 2 tablespoons finely chopped onions.

Stuff the zuccini with the meat mixture. Fry them with 2 tablespoons shortening till lightly brown.

Add tomato, chopped and sauce, and more water just till covered. Let boil.

Reduce heat to medium. Cover and let cook till done, about 30 minutes. If some of the stuffing is left, add it to the sauce before cooking.

Serve with pita bread.
Posted 11/18/08
PERSIAN SHAMI

1 pound ground lamb
1 pound garbanzo flour
3 whole eggs
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon ground saffron
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 cup vegetable oil

1. Massage (mix) the meat with your fingers for 10 or 15 minutes. Add eggs and mix 3 more minutes. Add cinnamon, saffron, salt and pepper and continue to massage the mixture until sticky. Form into patties with a hole in the middle, like a donut.

2. Fry slowly in vegetable oil until golden brown, turn and fry other side. Remove from oil and drain on paper towels.

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Posted 11/19/08

mr_kartoon wrote:

PERSIAN SHAMI

1 pound ground lamb
1 pound garbanzo flour
3 whole eggs
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon ground saffron
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 cup vegetable oil

1. Massage (mix) the meat with your fingers for 10 or 15 minutes. Add eggs and mix 3 more minutes. Add cinnamon, saffron, salt and pepper and continue to massage the mixture until sticky. Form into patties with a hole in the middle, like a donut.

2. Fry slowly in vegetable oil until golden brown, turn and fry other side. Remove from oil and drain on paper towels.



Wow.. thx MrK! This sounds ultra good!! I will make! any suggestions for what to serve with them?
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