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Post Reply Learning Japanese
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Posted 11/17/07 , edited 11/17/07
Here are some really basic Japanese characters:

Hiragana


Katakana

*Give credits to www2.tokai.co.jp*

and if you want basic greetings, this site probably help you abit..
http://www2.tokai.or.jp/yuki/japanese_words_and_phrases.htm
-OR-
you can ask me here...and i am sure there are couple Japanese of people in this group
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Posted 11/19/07
Let me help you guys a bit in learning to speak Japanese:
Pronunciation is Key!

a - ah (as in fAther)
i - ee (as in fEEt)
u - oo (as in fOOd)
e - a (as in hAte)
o - oh (as in OH look)

the rest are pronounced as you would in english but with the vowels above; (except for the 'n' and 'r')
example: 'Ki' - key, or 'Mu' - moo

when saying 'n' you don't always touch the top of your mouth with your tongue, depending on the word your saying
when saying 'r' you don't roll your tongue all the way back (the 'r' is almost like an L sound but not quite a full L)

Oh and the Japanese sentence structure is 'SOV' (subject, object, verb) unlike English 'SVO' (subject, verb, object);
example:

Japanese:
I Bread Eat
(Sub)(Object) (Verb)

English:
I Eat Bread
(Sub)(Verb) (Object)
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Posted 11/20/07
Oh, here are the differences between hiragana, katakana, and kanji. I know a lot who get kinda mixed up with this, esp. katakana.
-----
Hiragana - Hiragana is mostly used for native Japanese words. Usually they are used for words that are not made into kanji, like -san or particles, like to or from.

Also, if you do not remember the kanji for a certain word, people use hiragana in place of it.

-----

Katakana - Katakana is used for loan words, aka foreign words. When you write a foreign word in japanese writing, you don't write in hiragana, you write it in katakana.

Ex:

^ Above is the word ice cream (aisukuriimu) in both hiragana and katakana.
You wouldn't write ice cream in hiragana, because it is not originally a japanese word, so you would write it like the last one, which is katakana.

-----

Finally, kanji. Kanji are Chinese characters used in the Japanese language. Instead of using hiragana to write the word, you use Kanji, so it'll be shorter and faster to understand.
Ex:

Above are the words mountain, woods, and town.




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Posted 11/21/07
^ thans URbaka!
i always wonder how their sentence structure is different. now i finally get it!
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Posted 11/21/07
ouh so hard to understand my brain going to BooM!!
but i understand a little and i wonder you say "n" without touch the top of the mouth its hard,.....
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Posted 11/21/07
Yea, alot of people don't know the Japanese sentence structure and think it's the same as in English but it's not.

And yes it is hard for English speakers to understand how to pronounce the 'n' but once you get the hang of it, it gets pretty easy

Ganbatte!
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Posted 11/21/07
^ yeah i agree..

it's like..

Japanese = I icecream eat
English = I eat icecream

and some long complicated sentences will make me go crazy...
Posted 11/22/07

Omg........xD
And I thanked its easy....
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24 / F / at freesky online~
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Posted 11/22/07
i'm fine with hiragana and katakana, but i don't think I'll ever be able to pronounce kanji correctly...can't help but read it out in Chinese^^
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Posted 11/23/07
hey thankx alot for the explanation shannobi and URbaka lol it really helped alot .
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Posted 11/23/07
Counting in Japanese! (easier than counting in English, seriously)
一 ichi - one
二 ni - two
三 san - three
四 yon or shi - four ('yon' is said when saying the # four by it self, 'shi' is used when counting 1, 2, 3, 4, ...etc.)
五 go - five
六 roku - six
七 nana or shichi - seven (same as 4, nana for #, shichi for counting 1-10...etc.)
八 hachi -eight
九 kyuu or ku - nine (kyuu for #, ku for counting 1-10...etc)
十 juu - ten

for numbers 11-99
you basically add or multiply, example:
十一 juu ichi - eleven (literally: 10 and 1 [being added])
十九 juu kyuu - nineteen (literally: 10 and 9)
二十 ni juu - twenty (2 times 10 [now its multiplied])
二十六 ni juu roku - twenty six (2 times 10 and 6 [multiply and add])

a hundred, a thousand, and ten thousand
百 hyaku - a hundred
千 sen - a thousand
万 man - ten thousand
(to get numbers beyond a hundred you basically add and/or multiply)
二百 ni hyaku - two hundred (2 times 100)
三千二百一十 san sen ni hyaku ichi ju - 3,210 (3 times 1000 and 2 times 100 and 1 times 10)
一万 ichi man - ten thousand (1 times 10,000)
百万 hyaku man - a million (100 times 10,000)
千万 sen man - a billion (1,000 times 10,000)

Go have some fun with Japanese Numbers now that you know how to count from one to infinite in Japanese!
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Posted 11/24/07
yes im baka...hehe...........

do u really think its easier in japanese? all this calculation.....

anyway, thnx...
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Posted 11/24/07
haha. thanks alot.. and jim-sensei thanks alot i really look forward to seeing all that u sent me!

arh i still dont realy understand about using kata to write foreign words.. cos.. ice cream is ice cream.. japanese also know what it is, isnt it? not like ice cream is from another planet.. haha which words are like considered 'foreign'?

and i read somewhere that kata is usually used for formal occasions eg writing letter and stuff, even for some idol's autograph session. how about street signs and store promotions?
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Posted 11/24/07
All you really need to know about Katakana is that it's used to recognize foreign words. For example my name is Jim therefore if I go to Japan they would spell it using Katakana like so: ジイム (jimu), this way they know that my name is foreign and that I am a foreigner, If it were spelled using Hiragana then it would have meant that I am a Japanese person or I'm from Japan . (plus jimu in japanese means office work)
Oh, and pretty much anything not invented or created by the Japanese is considered to be foreign and the Japanese would use Katakana for the spelling of the word, like cola: コーラ ko-ra
Keep in mind the Katakana have the same sounds as Hiragana, just different characters. You really only need to know Katakana if you plan to write alot, other than that you can speak Japanese and they will still know.
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Posted 11/24/07
mina, watashi hontoni gomennasai. i am still new to constructing sentences.

http://linear.mv.com/cgi-bin/j-e/dict

i have found this site to be very very useful in finding the right words to use in translation. since there is multiple words that can almost be used in the same way. knowing multiple meaning to the word really helps in expressing yourself correctly. but as far as constructing a sentence or looking up phrases, this isn't the best but it really helps out a lot like a Thesaurus. also this site is good to look up the correct spelling for words to learn to pronounce it right if you hear a word and like to look it up
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