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Broken English = Funny
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Posted 5/22/08

i'm so lucky i'm not doing this job!
Posted 5/22/08
this is not mine... i just thought i'd share this.. and i dont mean to disgrace filipinos... its available on the internet anyway.. i'll just highlight stuff that even non filipinos can relate too. take time to read.. its worth the laugh..

FWD: Email Department: The Wit of the Filipino

My sister sent me this. Some of the stuff are old - Petal Attraction no longer exists at UP Diliman - but there’s still a few gems. I’d like to add: CainTaYo, a carinderia located in of course Cainta. There’s a Stephen King Carinderia in Cebu. Whether or not it was inspired by the writer or there’s a retired WWII veteran behind that name, I will never know. Also in Cebu: Anita Bakery and James Tailoring. I won’t even cite examples on the names. I still love Washington Dy Sy.

Like what the author said, Pinoys got to have a sense of humor or else he’d fall in despair.

***

Wit of the Filipino
By Nury Vittachi
From The Far Eastern Economic Review

THERE’S A SIGN ON Congressional Avenue in Manila that says: “Parking for Costumers Only.” This may be a misspelling of “customer.” But the Philippine capital is so full of theatrical, brightly dressed individuals that I prefer to think it may actually mean what it says. This week, we’ll take a reading tour of one of the most spirited communities in Asia. The Philippines is full of wordplay. The local accent, in which F and P are fairly interchangeable, is often used very cleverly, such as at the flower shop in Diliman called Petal Attraction.

Much of the wordplay in the Philippines is deliberate, with retailers favouring witty names, often based on Western celebrities and movies. Reader Elgar Esteban found a bread shop called Anita Bakery, a 24-hour restaurant called Doris Day and Night, a garment shop called Elizabeth Tailoring and a hairdresser called Felix The Cut.

Smart travellers can decipher initially baffling signs by simply trying out a Taglish (Tagalog-English) accent, such as that used on a sign at a restaurant in Cebu: “We Hab Sop-Drink In Can An In Batol.” A sewing accessories shop called Beads And Pieces also makes use of the local accent.

Of course, there are also many signs with oddly chosen words, but they are usually so entertaining that it would be a tragedy to “correct” them. A reader named Antonio “Tonyboy” Ramon T. Ongsiako (now there’s a truly Filipino name) found the following: In a restaurant in Baguio: “Wanted: Boy Waitress;” on a highway in Pampanga: “We Make Modern Antique Furniture;” on the window of a photography shop in Cabanatuan: “We Shoot You While You Wait;” on the glass wall of an eatery in Panay Avenue in Manila: “Wanted: Waiter, Cashier, Washier.”

Some of the notices one sees are thought-provoking. A shoe store in Pangasinan has a sign saying: “We Sell Imported Robber Shoes.” Could these be the sneakiest sort of sneakers? On a house in Jaro, Iloilo, one finds a sign saying: “House For Rent, Fully Furnaced.” Tonyboy commented, “Boy, it must be hot in there.”

Occasionally, the signs are quite poignant. Reader Gunilla Edlund saw one at a ferry pier outside Davao, southern Philippines, which said: “Adults:1USD; Child: 50 cents; Cadavers: subject to negotiation.” But most are purely witty, and display a love of Americana. Reader Robert Harland spotted a bakery named Bread Pitt, a Makati fast-food place selling maruya (banana fritters) called Maruya Carey, a water-engineering firm called Christopher Plumbing, a boutique called The Way We Wear, a video rental shop called Leon King Video Rental, a restaurant in the Cainta district of Rizal called Caintacky Fried Chicken, a local burger restaurant called Mang Donald’s, a doughnut shop called MacDonuts, a shop selling lumpia (meat parcels) in Makati called Wrap and Roll, and two butchers called Meating Place and Meatropolis.

Tourists from Europe may be intrigued to discover shops called Holland Hopia and Poland Hopia. Both sell a type of Chinese pastry called hopia. What’s the story? The names are explained thus: Holland Hopia is the domain of a man named Ho and Poland Hopia is run by a man named Po.

People in the Philippines also redesign English to be more efficient.”The creative confusion between language and culture leads to more than just simple unintentional errors in syntax, but in the adoption of new words,” says reader Rob Goodfellow. He came across a sign that said “House Fersallarend.” Why use five words (house for sale or rent) when two will do?

Tonyboy Ongsiako explains why there was so much wit in the Philippines. “We come from a country where you require a sense of humour to survive,” he says. “We have a 24-hour comedy show here called the government and a huge reserve of comedians made up mostly of politicians and bad actors.”
Posted 5/22/08

aicirtapsy wrote:


xxxbleyzxxx wrote:

no offense



i think this should be posted in this topic:
http://www.crunchyroll.com/forumtopic-125084/Anime-Motivational-Posters.html

i recommend this forum too.. i LOL-ed..


that forum is soooo
Posted 5/22/08

xxxbleyzxxx wrote:


aicirtapsy wrote:


xxxbleyzxxx wrote:

no offense



i think this should be posted in this topic:
http://www.crunchyroll.com/forumtopic-125084/Anime-Motivational-Posters.html

i recommend this forum too.. i LOL-ed..


that forum is soooo


totally agree.

Posted 5/22/08

aicirtapsy wrote:

this is not mine... i just thought i'd share this.. and i dont mean to disgrace filipinos... its available on the internet anyway.. i'll just highlight stuff that even non filipinos can relate too. take time to read.. its worth the laugh..

FWD: Email Department: The Wit of the Filipino

My sister sent me this. Some of the stuff are old - Petal Attraction no longer exists at UP Diliman - but there’s still a few gems. I’d like to add: CainTaYo, a carinderia located in of course Cainta. There’s a Stephen King Carinderia in Cebu. Whether or not it was inspired by the writer or there’s a retired WWII veteran behind that name, I will never know. Also in Cebu: Anita Bakery and James Tailoring. I won’t even cite examples on the names. I still love Washington Dy Sy.

Like what the author said, Pinoys got to have a sense of humor or else he’d fall in despair.

***

Wit of the Filipino
By Nury Vittachi
From The Far Eastern Economic Review

THERE’S A SIGN ON Congressional Avenue in Manila that says: “Parking for Costumers Only.” This may be a misspelling of “customer.” But the Philippine capital is so full of theatrical, brightly dressed individuals that I prefer to think it may actually mean what it says. This week, we’ll take a reading tour of one of the most spirited communities in Asia. The Philippines is full of wordplay. The local accent, in which F and P are fairly interchangeable, is often used very cleverly, such as at the flower shop in Diliman called Petal Attraction.

Much of the wordplay in the Philippines is deliberate, with retailers favouring witty names, often based on Western celebrities and movies. Reader Elgar Esteban found a bread shop called Anita Bakery, a 24-hour restaurant called Doris Day and Night, a garment shop called Elizabeth Tailoring and a hairdresser called Felix The Cut.

Smart travellers can decipher initially baffling signs by simply trying out a Taglish (Tagalog-English) accent, such as that used on a sign at a restaurant in Cebu: “We Hab Sop-Drink In Can An In Batol.” A sewing accessories shop called Beads And Pieces also makes use of the local accent.

Of course, there are also many signs with oddly chosen words, but they are usually so entertaining that it would be a tragedy to “correct” them. A reader named Antonio “Tonyboy” Ramon T. Ongsiako (now there’s a truly Filipino name) found the following: In a restaurant in Baguio: “Wanted: Boy Waitress;” on a highway in Pampanga: “We Make Modern Antique Furniture;” on the window of a photography shop in Cabanatuan: “We Shoot You While You Wait;” on the glass wall of an eatery in Panay Avenue in Manila: “Wanted: Waiter, Cashier, Washier.”

Some of the notices one sees are thought-provoking. A shoe store in Pangasinan has a sign saying: “We Sell Imported Robber Shoes.” Could these be the sneakiest sort of sneakers? On a house in Jaro, Iloilo, one finds a sign saying: “House For Rent, Fully Furnaced.” Tonyboy commented, “Boy, it must be hot in there.”

Occasionally, the signs are quite poignant. Reader Gunilla Edlund saw one at a ferry pier outside Davao, southern Philippines, which said: “Adults:1USD; Child: 50 cents; Cadavers: subject to negotiation.” But most are purely witty, and display a love of Americana. Reader Robert Harland spotted a bakery named Bread Pitt, a Makati fast-food place selling maruya (banana fritters) called Maruya Carey, a water-engineering firm called Christopher Plumbing, a boutique called The Way We Wear, a video rental shop called Leon King Video Rental, a restaurant in the Cainta district of Rizal called Caintacky Fried Chicken, a local burger restaurant called Mang Donald’s, a doughnut shop called MacDonuts, a shop selling lumpia (meat parcels) in Makati called Wrap and Roll, and two butchers called Meating Place and Meatropolis.

Tourists from Europe may be intrigued to discover shops called Holland Hopia and Poland Hopia. Both sell a type of Chinese pastry called hopia. What’s the story? The names are explained thus: Holland Hopia is the domain of a man named Ho and Poland Hopia is run by a man named Po.

People in the Philippines also redesign English to be more efficient.”The creative confusion between language and culture leads to more than just simple unintentional errors in syntax, but in the adoption of new words,” says reader Rob Goodfellow. He came across a sign that said “House Fersallarend.” Why use five words (house for sale or rent) when two will do?

Tonyboy Ongsiako explains why there was so much wit in the Philippines. “We come from a country where you require a sense of humour to survive,” he says. “We have a 24-hour comedy show here called the government and a huge reserve of comedians made up mostly of politicians and bad actors.”


lolz... and if anybody here already read the book "Bakit Baligtad Magbasa ng Libro ang mga Pilipino" by Bob Ong surely can relate...

Posted 5/22/08

cheesepizza wrote:

omg i love that site XD







oh shit!

hahaha

rofl
Posted 5/22/08

xxxbleyzxxx wrote:

lolz... and if anybody here already read the book "Bakit Baligtad Magbasa ng Libro ang mga Pilipino" by Bob Ong surely can relate...



i did!! and ABNKKBSNPLAKO... nice bob ong books
Posted 5/22/08

aicirtapsy wrote:


xxxbleyzxxx wrote:

lolz... and if anybody here already read the book "Bakit Baligtad Magbasa ng Libro ang mga Pilipino" by Bob Ong surely can relate...



i did!! and ABNKKBSNPLAKO... nice bob ong books


yeah!!! i read that too... that was really hilarious... man, i've been laughing out loud when i was reading that! Bob Ong really rocks!!! haha...
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Posted 5/22/08 , edited 5/22/08

xxxbleyzxxx wrote:
yeah!!! i read that too... that was really hilarious... man, i've been laughing out loud when i was reading that! Bob Ong really rocks!!! haha...


does it have funny engrish?
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Posted 5/22/08
Sometimes I do smile a sec when I saw some really funny translation. However, I will feel really bad. I mean not every countries/people are bi/multilingual (even if they do, they might not be strong in all the languages), thus it is not easy to translate them properly. Not to mention translating into a language that one is totally not familiar with.

Try to imagine that you are supposed to translate English into a language which you might even have problems making a complete sentence. Then someone post it on the internet. Everyone who saw it rofl.
Posted 5/22/08
some additionals... just copied and pasted from a random site

Update Date January 17, 2001
Submitted by Pepe.

Hilarious names
for Pinoy businesses

THE ECONOMIC downturn has prompted Filipino entrepreneurs to put up
businesses and products with hilarious names in a bid to grab customers.
And what catchy names they have come up with.

There's ''Cooking Ng Ina Mo,'' a carinderia specializing in home cooked
meals on Boni Avenue in Manduluyong City. Just a stone's throw from it
is a competitor called ''Cooking Ng Ina Mo Rin.''

From the names, one could easily get an idea about the specialties of
the eateries. Take for instance ''Caintacky Fried Chicken.'' Where
else, but in Cainta, Rizal.

What about ''Blue Marilyn?'' It's a sing-along, ihaw-ihaw restaurant on
Sucat Avenue in Parañaque. And ''Crispy Per Minute'' is another giveaway.
It offers crispy pata while ''Cleopata's'' is a bakahan and manukan.

The owner of ''Babalik Karinderia'' in Sto. Tomas, Batangas, seems to be
confident that his customers will return to the eatery.

'Cinna Von'
Urban living has created a demand for laundry service especially among
those who don't have maids. If they live in Pasig City they can go to
''Cinna Von,'' a laundrymat.

In Legaspi Village in Makati, the woman who takes orders for ''Launderland''
is reportedly named Alice.

In San Juan, there's a janitorial service company called City Cleaners
whose slogan is: ''Talk dirty to me.''

For those who enjoy beer, they can try ''Bali Gulp,'' which is just beside
Valley Golf on Sumulong highway in Antipolo.

Those who work near Buendia and Taft Avenues could go to ''Beery Good.''

A businessman or executive who wants to have a few drinks and feel not
being hounded by his wife may have a good reason to tell her that he is
in ''The Conference Room,'' a nightclub formerly near P. Burgos in Makati.

'O'Beer Time'
Newsmen, however, prefer the ''The Other Office,'' a bar in Ermita, Manila,
or maybe ''O'Beer Time.''

These names are culled from a list of establishments that Filipino techies
have gathered and shared with their friends on the Internet.

The list includes the following: *Fagoofyt (a children's hair salon on J.
Elizalde Avenue in BF Parañaque), Felix the Cut, Going Straight (a hair
straightening salon in Megamall), D'Scalp (a barbershop on Evangelista
Street in Makati), Curl Up And Dye (beauty salon) and Cutis (hair and
skin clinic on South Superhighway);

Beefer 150 (meat shop), Common Cents Store (sari-sari store), Happy
Birthday Toyo (a soy sauce brand in the 70's), Holland Hopia (owned by
Mr. Ho; next door is Poland Hopia, owned by Mr. Po in Chinatown Manila),
Bee Tin (Hopia Factory) and The Fried of Marikina ( fried chicken shop);

Ali Baka (A shawarma shop), Ace-Deo Optical (Tanay, Rizal), Alabank (rural
bank of Alabang), Beads and Pieces (bead shop), Berde Plants (plant shop
in Glorietta), Doctor Sebago (Shoe Repair Shop, Pasay), Dear Hunter (mail
order brides);

The Enchanted Florist, Elizabeth Tailoring, Leon King Video Rental (Las Piñas)
and Fernando Pe's Box Office Hits (video rental shop in Busuanga, Palawan).

'Funeraria Mabuhay'
Faithfully Yours (detective agency in Kamagong, Makati), Farmacia With
Love (drugstore ), Funeraria Mabuhay, Goldirocks (gravel and sand shop),
Goto Heaven, Ho Kee Yah (pronounced ''OK Ah!'' with a Chinese accent;
Chinese restaurant on Session Road in Baguio).

H. U. Kayin (deep-well drilling services), Income Taxi, INK-credible!
(a tattoo shop in Bicutan), Inno Scents (car freshener found in a Caltex
Starmart), James Tailoring, Jane's Pondahan and Jean Tonic (denim shop,
Shoppesville in Greenhills).

Juice Co. (fruit juice stand), Labo Optical, Lalafca (novelty store), Let's
Goat-Together (kambingan cum beer garden), Mahal Kita Honey (bottled honey
from Batangas), Maid To Order (maid placement agency), Mane Attraction
(beauty parlor) and Mang Donald's (burger joint, Naga City plaza that
serves quarter pounders and the Big Mang! . . . Mak-Mak and a side order
of Prince Fries).

Mat & Jeep (jeep accessories shop), Meatropolis (meat shop), Meating Place
(meat shop), Megamelt (ensaymada), Memory Drug (a Mercury Drug clone),
Mercy Drug (another Mercury Drug clone in Olongapo), Miki Mao (noodle
eatery), Motel Monaco and Nacho Fast (nachos to go).

'Mercy Buko'
Mercy Buko (fresh coconut roadside shop), Pa-Kap-Log (budget breakfast
package: pandesal, kape at itlog), Passers Buy (convenience store),
Perfect-Lee (sari-sari store in Alabang), Perm Foundation (a Christian
beauty salon) and Petal Attraction (flower shop).

Pig Out (restaurant/take-out in San Antonio Village, Makati specializing
in pork dishes), Pizza Hot (Pizza Place), Saudia Hairlines (beauty salon),
Scissors Palace (barber shop), Second Time Around (second hand watch store),
Side-saki (side street eatery beside Mandarin Hotel), Sophisticut (unisex
hair salon), Star Wash (launderette) and Susan's Roses (flower shop).

'TapSi TurBi'
Su-To-Kil (a seaside wet market/eatery near Mactan shrine, called
''Su-to-kil,'' which is great feast for ''sugba-tola-kilaw.'') Suzy's
Key Duplication, Sylvestre's Salon, TapSi TurBi (tapa, sinangag, turon
at bibingka) and 10/Q (convenience store chain).

The Way We Wear (boutique), Tio Paeng Longganisa Stand (Pampanga), To
Home It May Concern (furniture shop in Caloocan), Tree's Company
(artificial plant store, Pasay Road), Triple Bee (restaurant) and
Tutti Fruit-asan (fruit stall);

Wash & Carry (laundromat on Dian Street, Makati near Cash & Carry),
Washing Well (laundromat), Windows & Doors '98 (sash factory), Wheels
Fargo (eatery), yehey.com (Yahoo clone), Your Best Vet (veterinary
clinic), What's Disc? (novelty CD kiosk, Megamall) and Wrap and Roll
(lumpia outlet, Quad, Makati).

A menu in a seafood restaurant has these entrees: Isda best, Pusit to
the limit and Hipon coming back.


gomen .. im too lazy to highlight things....
Posted 5/22/08

Aegis85 wrote:


xxxbleyzxxx wrote:
yeah!!! i read that too... that was really hilarious... man, i've been laughing out loud when i was reading that! Bob Ong really rocks!!! haha...


does it have funny engrish?


yeah, some... but the majority of the contents in that book is in tagalog
Posted 5/22/08

Aegis85 wrote:


xxxbleyzxxx wrote:
yeah!!! i read that too... that was really hilarious... man, i've been laughing out loud when i was reading that! Bob Ong really rocks!!! haha...


does it have funny engrish?


it doesn't have any engrish. . . it just shows has filipino has funny flaws
Posted 5/22/08

Aegis85 wrote:


xxxbleyzxxx wrote:
yeah!!! i read that too... that was really hilarious... man, i've been laughing out loud when i was reading that! Bob Ong really rocks!!! haha...


does it have funny engrish?


a lot... im just not sure if all his books are in english...
though it doesn't focus on engrish, it focuses on Filipinos' 'dumb' ability and talent in a funny way..
Posted 5/22/08

YojimboMifune wrote:


Aegis85 wrote:


xxxbleyzxxx wrote:
yeah!!! i read that too... that was really hilarious... man, i've been laughing out loud when i was reading that! Bob Ong really rocks!!! haha...


does it have funny engrish?


it doesn't have any engrish. . . it just shows has filipino has funny flaws


it does...
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