Post Reply chain letter history?
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Posted 5/31/08
i was reading posts in the forums when i suddenly wondered where chain letters even came from..
i mean, here we are now totally pissed because of these chain letters..
but we don't even know where they came from or who invented them?
what is the purpose of these chain letters?

does anyone know??

if you know anything, please tell me..

i am so very curios o.O
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Posted 5/31/08
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The oldest known channel for chain letters is, of course, written or printed letters on paper. These might be exchanged hand-to-hand or distributed through the mail. One notorious early example was the "Prosperity Club" or "Send-a-Dime" letter. This letter started in Denver, Colorado in 1935, based on an earlier luck letter. It soon swamped the Denver post office with hundreds of thousands of letters before spilling into St. Louis and other cities

[E-mail

Some may seem fairly harmless, for example, a grammar school student wishing to see how many people can receive his e-mail for a science project, but can grow exponentially and be hard to stop. Messages sometimes include phony promises from companies or wealthy individuals (such as Bill Gates) promising a monetary reward to everyone who receives the message. They may also be politically motivated, such as "Save the Scouts, forward this to as many friends as possible", or a concept that Touched by an Angel may be forced off the air (which has never been proven true). Some recent chain e-mails say that a company "will stop its free email service if you don't send this message to X people".Some threaten users with bad luck if not forwarded. There are many forms of chain e-mail that threaten death or the taking of one's soul by telling tales of other's deaths, such as the Katu Lata Kulu chain e-mail, stating that if it is not forwarded, the receivers of the message will be killed by the spirit.[citation needed] Platforms like Facebook, YouTube and Myspace can host chain letters playing with user's emotions.

One chain letter distributed on MSN Hotmail began, "Hey it's Tara and John the directors of MSN"... and tells you that your account will be deleted if you don't sent that message to everyone. Of course this was not true

Chain Spiders

A chain spider is a type of electronic chain letter whereby recipients are encouraged to sign a petition in favour of a particular cause with the list of names contained within the message. This is called a chain spider because each time it is forwarded to a group of people each recipient receives an independent clone of the message such that numerous copies will exist with signatures being added to only one copy. For example if Fred started a chain spider and sent it initially to Katie and Andrew, who in turn signed it, Katie and Andrew would then have different lists to send on with Andrew's friends never being added to Katie's list and vice versa. Any chain spider with a large number of names on it is almost certainly fraudulently created because an exponential amount of these letters would have to exist for the letter to have been passed on in so many steps. For example, if each recipient who received a chain spider sent it on to 10 friends and nobody signed it twice, then for any one list of names to contain 10 signatures, everyone in the world must have signed one of the billion separate messages in existence.

Web communities

Chain letters have become widespread on MySpace (in the form of myspace bulletins) and Youtube (in the form of video comments) as well as on Facebook through messages or applications. Chain letters are often coupled with intimidating hoaxes or the promise of providing the sender with "secret" information once they've forwarded the message.

The Katu Lata Kulu chain message on YouTube has been a popular chain message in many videos. The original message states that the spirit of a girl from Africa that was killed would take the spirit of anyone who hadn't forwarded the message. Since the Katu Lata Kulu chain message started, many YouTube video comments had the chain message retold on their video comment page, angering many users to retaliate by creating parody videos as well as messages about the Katu Lata Kulu chain message curse. Many people tried to stop the demonic chain letter by spamming every found copy of it and reporting the poster. It worked.

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Posted 6/6/08

bluesky25 wrote:

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The oldest known channel for chain letters is, of course, written or printed letters on paper. These might be exchanged hand-to-hand or distributed through the mail. One notorious early example was the "Prosperity Club" or "Send-a-Dime" letter. This letter started in Denver, Colorado in 1935, based on an earlier luck letter. It soon swamped the Denver post office with hundreds of thousands of letters before spilling into St. Louis and other cities

[E-mail

Some may seem fairly harmless, for example, a grammar school student wishing to see how many people can receive his e-mail for a science project, but can grow exponentially and be hard to stop. Messages sometimes include phony promises from companies or wealthy individuals (such as Bill Gates) promising a monetary reward to everyone who receives the message. They may also be politically motivated, such as "Save the Scouts, forward this to as many friends as possible", or a concept that Touched by an Angel may be forced off the air (which has never been proven true). Some recent chain e-mails say that a company "will stop its free email service if you don't send this message to X people".Some threaten users with bad luck if not forwarded. There are many forms of chain e-mail that threaten death or the taking of one's soul by telling tales of other's deaths, such as the Katu Lata Kulu chain e-mail, stating that if it is not forwarded, the receivers of the message will be killed by the spirit.[citation needed] Platforms like Facebook, YouTube and Myspace can host chain letters playing with user's emotions.

One chain letter distributed on MSN Hotmail began, "Hey it's Tara and John the directors of MSN"... and tells you that your account will be deleted if you don't sent that message to everyone. Of course this was not true

Chain Spiders

A chain spider is a type of electronic chain letter whereby recipients are encouraged to sign a petition in favour of a particular cause with the list of names contained within the message. This is called a chain spider because each time it is forwarded to a group of people each recipient receives an independent clone of the message such that numerous copies will exist with signatures being added to only one copy. For example if Fred started a chain spider and sent it initially to Katie and Andrew, who in turn signed it, Katie and Andrew would then have different lists to send on with Andrew's friends never being added to Katie's list and vice versa. Any chain spider with a large number of names on it is almost certainly fraudulently created because an exponential amount of these letters would have to exist for the letter to have been passed on in so many steps. For example, if each recipient who received a chain spider sent it on to 10 friends and nobody signed it twice, then for any one list of names to contain 10 signatures, everyone in the world must have signed one of the billion separate messages in existence.

Web communities

Chain letters have become widespread on MySpace (in the form of myspace bulletins) and Youtube (in the form of video comments) as well as on Facebook through messages or applications. Chain letters are often coupled with intimidating hoaxes or the promise of providing the sender with "secret" information once they've forwarded the message.

The Katu Lata Kulu chain message on YouTube has been a popular chain message in many videos. The original message states that the spirit of a girl from Africa that was killed would take the spirit of anyone who hadn't forwarded the message. Since the Katu Lata Kulu chain message started, many YouTube video comments had the chain message retold on their video comment page, angering many users to retaliate by creating parody videos as well as messages about the Katu Lata Kulu chain message curse. Many people tried to stop the demonic chain letter by spamming every found copy of it and reporting the poster. It worked.


did u tried search the katu lata kulu video on youtube??

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Posted 6/7/08

ZiQiCuteCute wrote:


bluesky25 wrote:

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The oldest known channel for chain letters is, of course, written or printed letters on paper. These might be exchanged hand-to-hand or distributed through the mail. One notorious early example was the "Prosperity Club" or "Send-a-Dime" letter. This letter started in Denver, Colorado in 1935, based on an earlier luck letter. It soon swamped the Denver post office with hundreds of thousands of letters before spilling into St. Louis and other cities

[E-mail

Some may seem fairly harmless, for example, a grammar school student wishing to see how many people can receive his e-mail for a science project, but can grow exponentially and be hard to stop. Messages sometimes include phony promises from companies or wealthy individuals (such as Bill Gates) promising a monetary reward to everyone who receives the message. They may also be politically motivated, such as "Save the Scouts, forward this to as many friends as possible", or a concept that Touched by an Angel may be forced off the air (which has never been proven true). Some recent chain e-mails say that a company "will stop its free email service if you don't send this message to X people".Some threaten users with bad luck if not forwarded. There are many forms of chain e-mail that threaten death or the taking of one's soul by telling tales of other's deaths, such as the Katu Lata Kulu chain e-mail, stating that if it is not forwarded, the receivers of the message will be killed by the spirit.[citation needed] Platforms like Facebook, YouTube and Myspace can host chain letters playing with user's emotions.

One chain letter distributed on MSN Hotmail began, "Hey it's Tara and John the directors of MSN"... and tells you that your account will be deleted if you don't sent that message to everyone. Of course this was not true

Chain Spiders

A chain spider is a type of electronic chain letter whereby recipients are encouraged to sign a petition in favour of a particular cause with the list of names contained within the message. This is called a chain spider because each time it is forwarded to a group of people each recipient receives an independent clone of the message such that numerous copies will exist with signatures being added to only one copy. For example if Fred started a chain spider and sent it initially to Katie and Andrew, who in turn signed it, Katie and Andrew would then have different lists to send on with Andrew's friends never being added to Katie's list and vice versa. Any chain spider with a large number of names on it is almost certainly fraudulently created because an exponential amount of these letters would have to exist for the letter to have been passed on in so many steps. For example, if each recipient who received a chain spider sent it on to 10 friends and nobody signed it twice, then for any one list of names to contain 10 signatures, everyone in the world must have signed one of the billion separate messages in existence.

Web communities

Chain letters have become widespread on MySpace (in the form of myspace bulletins) and Youtube (in the form of video comments) as well as on Facebook through messages or applications. Chain letters are often coupled with intimidating hoaxes or the promise of providing the sender with "secret" information once they've forwarded the message.

The Katu Lata Kulu chain message on YouTube has been a popular chain message in many videos. The original message states that the spirit of a girl from Africa that was killed would take the spirit of anyone who hadn't forwarded the message. Since the Katu Lata Kulu chain message started, many YouTube video comments had the chain message retold on their video comment page, angering many users to retaliate by creating parody videos as well as messages about the Katu Lata Kulu chain message curse. Many people tried to stop the demonic chain letter by spamming every found copy of it and reporting the poster. It worked.


did u tried search the katu lata kulu video on youtube??



lol nope. i just got this from wiki. ;P
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Posted 6/7/08

bluesky25 wrote:


ZiQiCuteCute wrote:


bluesky25 wrote:

Print

The oldest known channel for chain letters is, of course, written or printed letters on paper. These might be exchanged hand-to-hand or distributed through the mail. One notorious early example was the "Prosperity Club" or "Send-a-Dime" letter. This letter started in Denver, Colorado in 1935, based on an earlier luck letter. It soon swamped the Denver post office with hundreds of thousands of letters before spilling into St. Louis and other cities

[E-mail

Some may seem fairly harmless, for example, a grammar school student wishing to see how many people can receive his e-mail for a science project, but can grow exponentially and be hard to stop. Messages sometimes include phony promises from companies or wealthy individuals (such as Bill Gates) promising a monetary reward to everyone who receives the message. They may also be politically motivated, such as "Save the Scouts, forward this to as many friends as possible", or a concept that Touched by an Angel may be forced off the air (which has never been proven true). Some recent chain e-mails say that a company "will stop its free email service if you don't send this message to X people".Some threaten users with bad luck if not forwarded. There are many forms of chain e-mail that threaten death or the taking of one's soul by telling tales of other's deaths, such as the Katu Lata Kulu chain e-mail, stating that if it is not forwarded, the receivers of the message will be killed by the spirit.[citation needed] Platforms like Facebook, YouTube and Myspace can host chain letters playing with user's emotions.

One chain letter distributed on MSN Hotmail began, "Hey it's Tara and John the directors of MSN"... and tells you that your account will be deleted if you don't sent that message to everyone. Of course this was not true

Chain Spiders

A chain spider is a type of electronic chain letter whereby recipients are encouraged to sign a petition in favour of a particular cause with the list of names contained within the message. This is called a chain spider because each time it is forwarded to a group of people each recipient receives an independent clone of the message such that numerous copies will exist with signatures being added to only one copy. For example if Fred started a chain spider and sent it initially to Katie and Andrew, who in turn signed it, Katie and Andrew would then have different lists to send on with Andrew's friends never being added to Katie's list and vice versa. Any chain spider with a large number of names on it is almost certainly fraudulently created because an exponential amount of these letters would have to exist for the letter to have been passed on in so many steps. For example, if each recipient who received a chain spider sent it on to 10 friends and nobody signed it twice, then for any one list of names to contain 10 signatures, everyone in the world must have signed one of the billion separate messages in existence.

Web communities

Chain letters have become widespread on MySpace (in the form of myspace bulletins) and Youtube (in the form of video comments) as well as on Facebook through messages or applications. Chain letters are often coupled with intimidating hoaxes or the promise of providing the sender with "secret" information once they've forwarded the message.

The Katu Lata Kulu chain message on YouTube has been a popular chain message in many videos. The original message states that the spirit of a girl from Africa that was killed would take the spirit of anyone who hadn't forwarded the message. Since the Katu Lata Kulu chain message started, many YouTube video comments had the chain message retold on their video comment page, angering many users to retaliate by creating parody videos as well as messages about the Katu Lata Kulu chain message curse. Many people tried to stop the demonic chain letter by spamming every found copy of it and reporting the poster. It worked.


did u tried search the katu lata kulu video on youtube??



lol nope. i just got this from wiki. ;P


i'm scared to search...lol
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Posted 6/9/08
Blah, it's like the Ring, you know. Starts off with some mysterious factor that makes you scared and yield to it anyway. Nothing is too big for God. I bet angels tried sending Him chainletters only to find themselves deleted off God's buddy list.
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Posted 6/11/08 , edited 6/12/08
Lawl, nice one.

Well, where did it come from?

It's probably when one nerd have nothing better to do, and created a letter and thought, " Hey, that's cool ! I'll scare all the crap outta people ! Since they're like, " Ew you're a nerd " this will be my revenge ! " and send it around. And then share the secert with his nerdy friends and his Nerd Alliances, and they go like, " OMGWTFBBQ ! You're a genius ! We'll do that too ! Scare those crap outta those people's ass which said that we're nerds ! They'll crap on themself ! HAHAHAH ! WE'RE SO DAMN SMART AREN'T WE ?" and more chain letters appear. And so on and so forth...

Lawl, just joking.
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Posted 7/1/08
dont know....whoever did this might be suffering O.T.C (otak tak centre) >>>translation...err..something wrong with their brains..<<<
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