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Post Reply what should we have on our menu???
Posted 6/5/08

animebabe007 wrote:


AmrasPallanen wrote:


animebabe007 wrote:


AmrasPallanen wrote:


animebabe007 wrote:


AmrasPallanen wrote:


animebabe007 wrote:


AmrasPallanen wrote:

I made a Japanese style menu want to see it leader.


yes i will...please let me look at it
can u post it here???


Rice type
* Genmai gohan (????): white rice cooked with brown rice
* Okowa (???): cooked glutinous rice
* Mugi gohan/meshi (???, ??): white rice cooked with barley
* Soy-flavored raw egg (Tamago kake gohan), nori, and furikake are popular condiments in Japanese breakfast
* Ochazuke: hot green tea or dashi poured over cooked white rice, often with various savoury ingredients such as umeboshi or tsukemono
* Onigiri: balls of rice with a filling in the middle. Japanese equivalent of sandwiches.
* Takikomi gohan: Japanese-style pilaf cooked with various ingredients and flavored with soy, dashi, etc.
* Kamameshi: rice topped with vegetables and chicken or seafood, then baked in an individual-sized pot
* Sekihan: red rice. white rice cooked with azuki beans to Glutinous rice
* Curry rice: Introduced from UK in the late 19th century, "curry rice" (kar? raisu ??????) is now one of the most popular dishes in Japan. It is not as spicy as its Indian counterpart.
* Hayashi rice: thick beef stew on rice; origin of the name is unknown but presumably named after a Mr. Hayashi.
* Omurice (Omu-raisu, ?????): omelet filled with fried rice, apparently originating from T?ky?
* Mochi: glutinous rice cake
* Ch?han: fried rice, adapted to Japanese tastes, tends to be lighter in flavour and style than the Chinese version from which it is derived
* Kayu or Okayu: (?, ??) rice congee (porridge), sometimes egg dropped and usually served to infants and sick people as easily digestible meals
* Zosui (Z?sui, ??) or Ojiya: a soup containing rice stewed in stock, often with egg, meat, seafood, vegetables or mushroom, and flavoured with miso or soy. Known as juushii in Okinawa. Some similarity to risotto and Kayu though Zosui uses cooked rice, as the difference is that kayu is made from raw rice.
* Katsudon: donburi topped with deep-fried breaded cutlet of pork (tonkatsudon), chicken (chickendon)
* Tekkadon: donburi topped with tuna sashimi
* Oyakodon (Parent and Child): donburi topped with chicken and egg (or sometimes salmon and salmon roe)
* Gy?don: donburi topped with seasoned beef
* Tendon: donburi topped with tempura (battered shrimp and vegetables).
* Unadon: donburi topped with broiled eel with vegetables.

Sushi type
# Nigiri-sushi: This is sushi with the ingredients on top of a block of rice.
# Maki-zushi: Translated as "roll sushi", this is where rice and seafood or other ingredients are placed on a sheet of seaweed (nori) and rolled into a cylindrical shape on a bamboo mat and then cut into smaller pieces.
# Temaki: Basically the same as makizushi, except that the nori is rolled into a cone-shape with the ingredients placed inside. Sometimes referred to as a "hand-roll".
# Chirashi: Translated as "scattered", chirashi involves fresh sea food, vegetables or other ingredients being placed on top of sushi rice in a bowl or dish

Noodle type
# Soba: thin brown buckwheat noodles. Also known as Nihon-soba ("Japanese soba"). In Okinawa, soba likely refers to Okinawa soba (see below).
# Udon: thick wheat noodles served with various toppings, usually in a hot soy-dashi broth, or sometimes in a Japanese curry soup.
# Somen: thin wheat noodles served chilled with a dipping sauce. Hot Somen is called Nyumen
* Ramen: thin light yellow noodles served in hot chicken or pork broth with various toppings; of Chinese origin, it is a popular and common item in Japan. Also known as Shina-soba (????) or Chuka-soba (????) (both mean "Chinese-style soba")
* Champon: yellow noodles of medium thickness served with a great variety of seafood and vegetable toppings in a hot chicken broth which originated in Nagasaki as a cheap food for students
* Okinawa soba: thick wheat-flour noodles served in Okinawa, often served in a hot broth with s?ki, steamed pork. Akin to a cross between udon and ramen.
* Zaru soba: Soba noodles served cold
* Yaki soba: Fried Chinese noodles
* Yaki udon: Fried udon noodles

Bread type
* Curry bread (kar? pan): deep fried bread filled with Japanese curry sauce.
* Anpan: sweet bun filled with red bean(anko) paste.
* Yakisoba-pan: bread roll sandwich with yakisoba (fried noodles and red pickled ginger) filling.
* Melon-pan: very sweet fluffy bread.
* Katsu-sando: sandwich with tonkatsu (breaded pork cutlet) filling.

Deep-fried dishes
* Karaage: bite-sized pieces of chicken, fish, octopus, or other meat, floured and deep fried. Common izakaya food, also often available in convenience stores.
* Korokke (croquette): breaded and deep-fried patties, containing either mashed potato or white sauce mixed with minced meat, vegetables or seafood. Popular everyday food.
* Kushikatsu: skewered meat, vegetables or seafood, breaded and deep fried.
* Tempura: deep-fried vegetables or seafood in a light, distinctive batter.
* Tonkatsu: deep-fried breaded cutlet of pork (chicken versions are called chicken katsu).

Grilled and pan-fried dishes
* Gyoza: Chinese ravioli-dumplings (potstickers), usually filled with pork and vegetables and pan-fried.
* Kushiyaki: skewers of meat and vegetables.
* Okonomiyaki: savory pancakes with various meat and vegetable ingredients, flavoured with the likes of Worcestershire sauce or mayonnaise.
* Takoyaki: a spherical, fried dumpling of batter with a piece of octopus inside. Popular street snack.
* Teriyaki: grilled, broiled, or pan-fried meat, fish, chicken or vegetables glazed with a sweetened soy sauce.
* Unagi, including Kabayaki: grilled and flavored eel.
* Yakiniku ("grilled meat"): may refer to several things. Vegetables such as bite-sized onion, carrot, cabbage, mushrooms, and bell pepper are usually grilled together. Grilled ingredients are dipped in a sauce known as tare before being eaten.
* Horumonyaki ("offal-grill"): similar homegrown dish, but using offal
* Genghis Khan barbecue: barbecued lamb or mutton, with various seafoods and vegetables. A speciality of Hokkaid?.
* Yakitori: barbecued chicken skewers, usually served with beer. In Japan, yakitori usually consists of a wide variety of parts of the chicken. It is not usual to see straight chicken meat as the only type of yakitori in a meal.
* Yakizakana: flame-grilled fish, often served with grated daikon. One of the most common dishes served at home. Because of the simple cuisine, fresh fish in season are highly preferable.

Nabemono (one pot "steamboat" cooking)
* Oden: surimi, boiled eggs, daikon radish, konnyaku, and fish cakes stewed in a light, soy-flavoured dashi broth. Common wintertime food and often available in convenience stores.
* Motsunabe: beef offal, Chinese cabbage and various vegetables cooked in a light soup base.
* Shabu-shabu: hot pot with thinly sliced beef, vegetables, and tofu, cooked in a thin stock at the table and dipped in a soy or sesame-based dip before eating.
* Sukiyaki: thinly sliced beef and vegetables cooked in a mixture of soy sauce, dashi, sugar, and sake. Participants cook at the table then dip food into their individual bowls of raw egg before eating it.
* Tecchiri: hot pot with blowfish and vegetables, a specialty of Osaka.

Nimono (stewed dishes)
* Kakuni: chunks of pork belly stewed in soy, mirin and sake with large pieces of daikon and whole boiled eggs. The Okinawan variation, using awamori, soy sauce and miso, is known as rafuti.
* Nikujaga: beef and potato stew, flavoured with sweet soy
* Nizakana: fish poached in sweet soy (often on the menu as "nitsuke")
* s?ki: Okinawan dish of pork stewed with bone

Itamemono (stir-fried dishes)
* Chanpur?: A stir-fry from Okinawa, of vegetables, tofu, meat or seafood and sometimes egg. Many varieties, the most famous being g?y? chanpur?.
* Kinpira gobo: Thin sticks of greater burdock (gobo, ???) and other root vegetables stir-fried and braised in sweetened soy.

Sashimi (
* Fugu: sliced poisonous pufferfish (sometimes lethal), a uniquely Japanese specialty. The chef responsible for preparing it must be licensed.
* Ikizukuri: live sashimi
* Tataki (ja:???): raw/very rare skipjack tuna or beef steak seared on the outside and sliced, or a finely chopped fish, spiced with the likes of chopped spring onions, ginger or garlic paste.
* Basashi (ja:???): horse meat sashimi, sometimes called sakura (?), is a regional speciality in certain areas such as Shinshu (Nagano, Gifu and Toyama prefectures) and Kumamoto.[1] Basashi features on the menu of many izakayas, even on the menus of big national chains.
* Torisashi: chicken breast sashimi, regional specialty of Kagoshima, Miyazaki prefectures.
* Rebasashi: usually liver of calf, completely raw (rare version is called "aburi" (???)), usually dipped in salted sesame oil rather than soy sauce.
* Shikasashi: deer meat sashimi, a rare delicacy in certain parts of Japan, frequently causes acute hepatitis E by eating hunted wild deer.

Soups
* Miso soup: soup made with miso dissolved in dashi, usually containing two or three types of solid ingredients, such as seaweed, vegetables or tofu.
* Tonjiru: similar to Miso soup, except that pork is added to the ingredients
* Dangojiru: soup made with dumplings along with seaweed, tofu, lotus root, or any number of other vegetables and roots
* Imoni: a thick taro potato stew popular in Northern Japan during the autumn season
* Sumashijiru: a clear soup made with dashi and seafood
* Zoni: soup containing mochi rice cakes along with various vegetables and often chicken. It is usually eaten at New Years Day.
* Kiritanpo: freshly cooked rice is pounded, formed into cylinders around cryptomeria skewers, and toasted at an open hearth. The kiritanpo are used as dumplings in soups.

Pickled or salted foods
* Ikura: salt cured salmon caviar.
* Mentaiko: salt-cured pollock roe.
* Shiokara: salty fermented viscera.
* Tsukemono: pickled vegetables, hundreds of varieties and served with most rice-based meals.
* Umeboshi: small, pickled ume fruit. Usually red and very sour, often served with bento lunch boxes or as a filling for onigiri.
* Tsukudani: Very small fish, shellfish or seaweed stewed in sweetened soy for preservation.

Miscellaneous
# Agedashi dofu: cubes of deep-fried silken tofu served in hot broth.
# Bento or Obento: combination meal served in a wooden box, usually as a cold lunchbox.
# Chawan mushi: meat (seafood and/or chicken) and vegetables steamed in egg custard.
# Edamame: boiled and salted pods of soybeans, eaten as a snack, often to accompany beer.
# Himono: dried fish, often aji (?, Japanese jack mackerel). Traditionally served for breakfast with rice, miso soup and pickles.
# Hiyayakko: chilled tofu with garnish.
# Natto: fermented soybeans, stringy like melted cheese, infamous for its strong smell and slippery texture. Often eaten for breakfast.
# Ohitashi: boiled greens such as spinach, chilled and flavoured with soy sauce, often with garnish.
# Osechi: traditional foods eaten at New Year.
# Sunomono: vegetables such as cucumber or wakame, or sometimes crab, marinated in rice vinegar

Japanese-style sweets
* Amanatt is a Japanese traditional confectionery which is made of azuki beans or other beans, covered with refined sugar after simmered with sugar syrup and dried.
* Dango is a Japanese dumpling made from mochiko (rice flour), related to mochi. It is often served with green tea.
* hanabiramochi is a Japanese sweetmeat (wagashi), usually eaten at the beginning of the year.
Hanabiramochi are also served at the first tea ceremony of the new year.
* Higashi , is a type of wagashi, which is dry and contains very little moisture.
* Hoshigaki: Dried persimmon fruit
* Imagawayaki: also known as 'Taikoyaki' is a round Taiyaki and fillings are same
* Kakigori: shaved ice with syrup topping.
* Kompeito: crystal sugar candy
* Manju: sticky rice surrounding a sweet bean center
* Matsunoyuki
* Mochi: steamed sweet rice pounded into a solid, sticky, and somewhat translucent mass
* Oshiruko: a warm, sweet red bean (an) soup with mochi: rice cake
* Uiro: a steamed cake made of rice flour
* Taiyaki: a fried, fish-shaped cake, usually with a sweet filling such as an: red bean paste

Old-fashioned Japanese-style sweets
* Karumetou: Brown sugar cake. Also called Karumeyaki
* Sosu Senbei: Thin wafers eaten with soy sauce
* Mizuame: sticky liquid sugar candy

Western-style sweets (y?gashi, ???)
* Kasutera: "Castella" Iberian-style sponge cake
* Mirukurepu: "mille crepe": layered crepe (in French, "one thousand leaves

Sweets bread
* Anpan: bread with sweet bean paste in the center
* Melonpan: a large, round bun which is a combination of regular dough beneath cookie dough, with a sweet filling in between.






.....that is a lot...how long have u needed to make this list???xD


Three hours. is that bad.


no its not bad...i am really happ that u are doing so much for our group...i will make an extra page for this menu ...is this ok??and if u dont mind i would like to make u moderator^^


actually, I made this for another group. who did a bar theme. but I don't mind shareing it here though. Im also a chef there.


thx for your help^^and do u mind being moderator??


I don't mind.
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Posted 6/5/08

AmrasPallanen wrote:


animebabe007 wrote:


AmrasPallanen wrote:


animebabe007 wrote:


AmrasPallanen wrote:


animebabe007 wrote:


AmrasPallanen wrote:


animebabe007 wrote:


AmrasPallanen wrote:

I made a Japanese style menu want to see it leader.


yes i will...please let me look at it
can u post it here???


Rice type
* Genmai gohan (????): white rice cooked with brown rice
* Okowa (???): cooked glutinous rice
* Mugi gohan/meshi (???, ??): white rice cooked with barley
* Soy-flavored raw egg (Tamago kake gohan), nori, and furikake are popular condiments in Japanese breakfast
* Ochazuke: hot green tea or dashi poured over cooked white rice, often with various savoury ingredients such as umeboshi or tsukemono
* Onigiri: balls of rice with a filling in the middle. Japanese equivalent of sandwiches.
* Takikomi gohan: Japanese-style pilaf cooked with various ingredients and flavored with soy, dashi, etc.
* Kamameshi: rice topped with vegetables and chicken or seafood, then baked in an individual-sized pot
* Sekihan: red rice. white rice cooked with azuki beans to Glutinous rice
* Curry rice: Introduced from UK in the late 19th century, "curry rice" (kar? raisu ??????) is now one of the most popular dishes in Japan. It is not as spicy as its Indian counterpart.
* Hayashi rice: thick beef stew on rice; origin of the name is unknown but presumably named after a Mr. Hayashi.
* Omurice (Omu-raisu, ?????): omelet filled with fried rice, apparently originating from T?ky?
* Mochi: glutinous rice cake
* Ch?han: fried rice, adapted to Japanese tastes, tends to be lighter in flavour and style than the Chinese version from which it is derived
* Kayu or Okayu: (?, ??) rice congee (porridge), sometimes egg dropped and usually served to infants and sick people as easily digestible meals
* Zosui (Z?sui, ??) or Ojiya: a soup containing rice stewed in stock, often with egg, meat, seafood, vegetables or mushroom, and flavoured with miso or soy. Known as juushii in Okinawa. Some similarity to risotto and Kayu though Zosui uses cooked rice, as the difference is that kayu is made from raw rice.
* Katsudon: donburi topped with deep-fried breaded cutlet of pork (tonkatsudon), chicken (chickendon)
* Tekkadon: donburi topped with tuna sashimi
* Oyakodon (Parent and Child): donburi topped with chicken and egg (or sometimes salmon and salmon roe)
* Gy?don: donburi topped with seasoned beef
* Tendon: donburi topped with tempura (battered shrimp and vegetables).
* Unadon: donburi topped with broiled eel with vegetables.

Sushi type
# Nigiri-sushi: This is sushi with the ingredients on top of a block of rice.
# Maki-zushi: Translated as "roll sushi", this is where rice and seafood or other ingredients are placed on a sheet of seaweed (nori) and rolled into a cylindrical shape on a bamboo mat and then cut into smaller pieces.
# Temaki: Basically the same as makizushi, except that the nori is rolled into a cone-shape with the ingredients placed inside. Sometimes referred to as a "hand-roll".
# Chirashi: Translated as "scattered", chirashi involves fresh sea food, vegetables or other ingredients being placed on top of sushi rice in a bowl or dish

Noodle type
# Soba: thin brown buckwheat noodles. Also known as Nihon-soba ("Japanese soba"). In Okinawa, soba likely refers to Okinawa soba (see below).
# Udon: thick wheat noodles served with various toppings, usually in a hot soy-dashi broth, or sometimes in a Japanese curry soup.
# Somen: thin wheat noodles served chilled with a dipping sauce. Hot Somen is called Nyumen
* Ramen: thin light yellow noodles served in hot chicken or pork broth with various toppings; of Chinese origin, it is a popular and common item in Japan. Also known as Shina-soba (????) or Chuka-soba (????) (both mean "Chinese-style soba")
* Champon: yellow noodles of medium thickness served with a great variety of seafood and vegetable toppings in a hot chicken broth which originated in Nagasaki as a cheap food for students
* Okinawa soba: thick wheat-flour noodles served in Okinawa, often served in a hot broth with s?ki, steamed pork. Akin to a cross between udon and ramen.
* Zaru soba: Soba noodles served cold
* Yaki soba: Fried Chinese noodles
* Yaki udon: Fried udon noodles

Bread type
* Curry bread (kar? pan): deep fried bread filled with Japanese curry sauce.
* Anpan: sweet bun filled with red bean(anko) paste.
* Yakisoba-pan: bread roll sandwich with yakisoba (fried noodles and red pickled ginger) filling.
* Melon-pan: very sweet fluffy bread.
* Katsu-sando: sandwich with tonkatsu (breaded pork cutlet) filling.

Deep-fried dishes
* Karaage: bite-sized pieces of chicken, fish, octopus, or other meat, floured and deep fried. Common izakaya food, also often available in convenience stores.
* Korokke (croquette): breaded and deep-fried patties, containing either mashed potato or white sauce mixed with minced meat, vegetables or seafood. Popular everyday food.
* Kushikatsu: skewered meat, vegetables or seafood, breaded and deep fried.
* Tempura: deep-fried vegetables or seafood in a light, distinctive batter.
* Tonkatsu: deep-fried breaded cutlet of pork (chicken versions are called chicken katsu).

Grilled and pan-fried dishes
* Gyoza: Chinese ravioli-dumplings (potstickers), usually filled with pork and vegetables and pan-fried.
* Kushiyaki: skewers of meat and vegetables.
* Okonomiyaki: savory pancakes with various meat and vegetable ingredients, flavoured with the likes of Worcestershire sauce or mayonnaise.
* Takoyaki: a spherical, fried dumpling of batter with a piece of octopus inside. Popular street snack.
* Teriyaki: grilled, broiled, or pan-fried meat, fish, chicken or vegetables glazed with a sweetened soy sauce.
* Unagi, including Kabayaki: grilled and flavored eel.
* Yakiniku ("grilled meat"): may refer to several things. Vegetables such as bite-sized onion, carrot, cabbage, mushrooms, and bell pepper are usually grilled together. Grilled ingredients are dipped in a sauce known as tare before being eaten.
* Horumonyaki ("offal-grill"): similar homegrown dish, but using offal
* Genghis Khan barbecue: barbecued lamb or mutton, with various seafoods and vegetables. A speciality of Hokkaid?.
* Yakitori: barbecued chicken skewers, usually served with beer. In Japan, yakitori usually consists of a wide variety of parts of the chicken. It is not usual to see straight chicken meat as the only type of yakitori in a meal.
* Yakizakana: flame-grilled fish, often served with grated daikon. One of the most common dishes served at home. Because of the simple cuisine, fresh fish in season are highly preferable.

Nabemono (one pot "steamboat" cooking)
* Oden: surimi, boiled eggs, daikon radish, konnyaku, and fish cakes stewed in a light, soy-flavoured dashi broth. Common wintertime food and often available in convenience stores.
* Motsunabe: beef offal, Chinese cabbage and various vegetables cooked in a light soup base.
* Shabu-shabu: hot pot with thinly sliced beef, vegetables, and tofu, cooked in a thin stock at the table and dipped in a soy or sesame-based dip before eating.
* Sukiyaki: thinly sliced beef and vegetables cooked in a mixture of soy sauce, dashi, sugar, and sake. Participants cook at the table then dip food into their individual bowls of raw egg before eating it.
* Tecchiri: hot pot with blowfish and vegetables, a specialty of Osaka.

Nimono (stewed dishes)
* Kakuni: chunks of pork belly stewed in soy, mirin and sake with large pieces of daikon and whole boiled eggs. The Okinawan variation, using awamori, soy sauce and miso, is known as rafuti.
* Nikujaga: beef and potato stew, flavoured with sweet soy
* Nizakana: fish poached in sweet soy (often on the menu as "nitsuke")
* s?ki: Okinawan dish of pork stewed with bone

Itamemono (stir-fried dishes)
* Chanpur?: A stir-fry from Okinawa, of vegetables, tofu, meat or seafood and sometimes egg. Many varieties, the most famous being g?y? chanpur?.
* Kinpira gobo: Thin sticks of greater burdock (gobo, ???) and other root vegetables stir-fried and braised in sweetened soy.

Sashimi (
* Fugu: sliced poisonous pufferfish (sometimes lethal), a uniquely Japanese specialty. The chef responsible for preparing it must be licensed.
* Ikizukuri: live sashimi
* Tataki (ja:???): raw/very rare skipjack tuna or beef steak seared on the outside and sliced, or a finely chopped fish, spiced with the likes of chopped spring onions, ginger or garlic paste.
* Basashi (ja:???): horse meat sashimi, sometimes called sakura (?), is a regional speciality in certain areas such as Shinshu (Nagano, Gifu and Toyama prefectures) and Kumamoto.[1] Basashi features on the menu of many izakayas, even on the menus of big national chains.
* Torisashi: chicken breast sashimi, regional specialty of Kagoshima, Miyazaki prefectures.
* Rebasashi: usually liver of calf, completely raw (rare version is called "aburi" (???)), usually dipped in salted sesame oil rather than soy sauce.
* Shikasashi: deer meat sashimi, a rare delicacy in certain parts of Japan, frequently causes acute hepatitis E by eating hunted wild deer.

Soups
* Miso soup: soup made with miso dissolved in dashi, usually containing two or three types of solid ingredients, such as seaweed, vegetables or tofu.
* Tonjiru: similar to Miso soup, except that pork is added to the ingredients
* Dangojiru: soup made with dumplings along with seaweed, tofu, lotus root, or any number of other vegetables and roots
* Imoni: a thick taro potato stew popular in Northern Japan during the autumn season
* Sumashijiru: a clear soup made with dashi and seafood
* Zoni: soup containing mochi rice cakes along with various vegetables and often chicken. It is usually eaten at New Years Day.
* Kiritanpo: freshly cooked rice is pounded, formed into cylinders around cryptomeria skewers, and toasted at an open hearth. The kiritanpo are used as dumplings in soups.

Pickled or salted foods
* Ikura: salt cured salmon caviar.
* Mentaiko: salt-cured pollock roe.
* Shiokara: salty fermented viscera.
* Tsukemono: pickled vegetables, hundreds of varieties and served with most rice-based meals.
* Umeboshi: small, pickled ume fruit. Usually red and very sour, often served with bento lunch boxes or as a filling for onigiri.
* Tsukudani: Very small fish, shellfish or seaweed stewed in sweetened soy for preservation.

Miscellaneous
# Agedashi dofu: cubes of deep-fried silken tofu served in hot broth.
# Bento or Obento: combination meal served in a wooden box, usually as a cold lunchbox.
# Chawan mushi: meat (seafood and/or chicken) and vegetables steamed in egg custard.
# Edamame: boiled and salted pods of soybeans, eaten as a snack, often to accompany beer.
# Himono: dried fish, often aji (?, Japanese jack mackerel). Traditionally served for breakfast with rice, miso soup and pickles.
# Hiyayakko: chilled tofu with garnish.
# Natto: fermented soybeans, stringy like melted cheese, infamous for its strong smell and slippery texture. Often eaten for breakfast.
# Ohitashi: boiled greens such as spinach, chilled and flavoured with soy sauce, often with garnish.
# Osechi: traditional foods eaten at New Year.
# Sunomono: vegetables such as cucumber or wakame, or sometimes crab, marinated in rice vinegar

Japanese-style sweets
* Amanatt is a Japanese traditional confectionery which is made of azuki beans or other beans, covered with refined sugar after simmered with sugar syrup and dried.
* Dango is a Japanese dumpling made from mochiko (rice flour), related to mochi. It is often served with green tea.
* hanabiramochi is a Japanese sweetmeat (wagashi), usually eaten at the beginning of the year.
Hanabiramochi are also served at the first tea ceremony of the new year.
* Higashi , is a type of wagashi, which is dry and contains very little moisture.
* Hoshigaki: Dried persimmon fruit
* Imagawayaki: also known as 'Taikoyaki' is a round Taiyaki and fillings are same
* Kakigori: shaved ice with syrup topping.
* Kompeito: crystal sugar candy
* Manju: sticky rice surrounding a sweet bean center
* Matsunoyuki
* Mochi: steamed sweet rice pounded into a solid, sticky, and somewhat translucent mass
* Oshiruko: a warm, sweet red bean (an) soup with mochi: rice cake
* Uiro: a steamed cake made of rice flour
* Taiyaki: a fried, fish-shaped cake, usually with a sweet filling such as an: red bean paste

Old-fashioned Japanese-style sweets
* Karumetou: Brown sugar cake. Also called Karumeyaki
* Sosu Senbei: Thin wafers eaten with soy sauce
* Mizuame: sticky liquid sugar candy

Western-style sweets (y?gashi, ???)
* Kasutera: "Castella" Iberian-style sponge cake
* Mirukurepu: "mille crepe": layered crepe (in French, "one thousand leaves

Sweets bread
* Anpan: bread with sweet bean paste in the center
* Melonpan: a large, round bun which is a combination of regular dough beneath cookie dough, with a sweet filling in between.






.....that is a lot...how long have u needed to make this list???xD


Three hours. is that bad.


no its not bad...i am really happ that u are doing so much for our group...i will make an extra page for this menu ...is this ok??and if u dont mind i would like to make u moderator^^


actually, I made this for another group. who did a bar theme. but I don't mind shareing it here though. Im also a chef there.


thx for your help^^and do u mind being moderator??


I don't mind.


ok thx
Posted 6/5/08

animebabe007 wrote:


AmrasPallanen wrote:


animebabe007 wrote:


AmrasPallanen wrote:


animebabe007 wrote:


AmrasPallanen wrote:


animebabe007 wrote:


AmrasPallanen wrote:


animebabe007 wrote:


AmrasPallanen wrote:

I made a Japanese style menu want to see it leader.


yes i will...please let me look at it
can u post it here???


Rice type
* Genmai gohan (????): white rice cooked with brown rice
* Okowa (???): cooked glutinous rice
* Mugi gohan/meshi (???, ??): white rice cooked with barley
* Soy-flavored raw egg (Tamago kake gohan), nori, and furikake are popular condiments in Japanese breakfast
* Ochazuke: hot green tea or dashi poured over cooked white rice, often with various savoury ingredients such as umeboshi or tsukemono
* Onigiri: balls of rice with a filling in the middle. Japanese equivalent of sandwiches.
* Takikomi gohan: Japanese-style pilaf cooked with various ingredients and flavored with soy, dashi, etc.
* Kamameshi: rice topped with vegetables and chicken or seafood, then baked in an individual-sized pot
* Sekihan: red rice. white rice cooked with azuki beans to Glutinous rice
* Curry rice: Introduced from UK in the late 19th century, "curry rice" (kar? raisu ??????) is now one of the most popular dishes in Japan. It is not as spicy as its Indian counterpart.
* Hayashi rice: thick beef stew on rice; origin of the name is unknown but presumably named after a Mr. Hayashi.
* Omurice (Omu-raisu, ?????): omelet filled with fried rice, apparently originating from T?ky?
* Mochi: glutinous rice cake
* Ch?han: fried rice, adapted to Japanese tastes, tends to be lighter in flavour and style than the Chinese version from which it is derived
* Kayu or Okayu: (?, ??) rice congee (porridge), sometimes egg dropped and usually served to infants and sick people as easily digestible meals
* Zosui (Z?sui, ??) or Ojiya: a soup containing rice stewed in stock, often with egg, meat, seafood, vegetables or mushroom, and flavoured with miso or soy. Known as juushii in Okinawa. Some similarity to risotto and Kayu though Zosui uses cooked rice, as the difference is that kayu is made from raw rice.
* Katsudon: donburi topped with deep-fried breaded cutlet of pork (tonkatsudon), chicken (chickendon)
* Tekkadon: donburi topped with tuna sashimi
* Oyakodon (Parent and Child): donburi topped with chicken and egg (or sometimes salmon and salmon roe)
* Gy?don: donburi topped with seasoned beef
* Tendon: donburi topped with tempura (battered shrimp and vegetables).
* Unadon: donburi topped with broiled eel with vegetables.

Sushi type
# Nigiri-sushi: This is sushi with the ingredients on top of a block of rice.
# Maki-zushi: Translated as "roll sushi", this is where rice and seafood or other ingredients are placed on a sheet of seaweed (nori) and rolled into a cylindrical shape on a bamboo mat and then cut into smaller pieces.
# Temaki: Basically the same as makizushi, except that the nori is rolled into a cone-shape with the ingredients placed inside. Sometimes referred to as a "hand-roll".
# Chirashi: Translated as "scattered", chirashi involves fresh sea food, vegetables or other ingredients being placed on top of sushi rice in a bowl or dish

Noodle type
# Soba: thin brown buckwheat noodles. Also known as Nihon-soba ("Japanese soba"). In Okinawa, soba likely refers to Okinawa soba (see below).
# Udon: thick wheat noodles served with various toppings, usually in a hot soy-dashi broth, or sometimes in a Japanese curry soup.
# Somen: thin wheat noodles served chilled with a dipping sauce. Hot Somen is called Nyumen
* Ramen: thin light yellow noodles served in hot chicken or pork broth with various toppings; of Chinese origin, it is a popular and common item in Japan. Also known as Shina-soba (????) or Chuka-soba (????) (both mean "Chinese-style soba")
* Champon: yellow noodles of medium thickness served with a great variety of seafood and vegetable toppings in a hot chicken broth which originated in Nagasaki as a cheap food for students
* Okinawa soba: thick wheat-flour noodles served in Okinawa, often served in a hot broth with s?ki, steamed pork. Akin to a cross between udon and ramen.
* Zaru soba: Soba noodles served cold
* Yaki soba: Fried Chinese noodles
* Yaki udon: Fried udon noodles

Bread type
* Curry bread (kar? pan): deep fried bread filled with Japanese curry sauce.
* Anpan: sweet bun filled with red bean(anko) paste.
* Yakisoba-pan: bread roll sandwich with yakisoba (fried noodles and red pickled ginger) filling.
* Melon-pan: very sweet fluffy bread.
* Katsu-sando: sandwich with tonkatsu (breaded pork cutlet) filling.

Deep-fried dishes
* Karaage: bite-sized pieces of chicken, fish, octopus, or other meat, floured and deep fried. Common izakaya food, also often available in convenience stores.
* Korokke (croquette): breaded and deep-fried patties, containing either mashed potato or white sauce mixed with minced meat, vegetables or seafood. Popular everyday food.
* Kushikatsu: skewered meat, vegetables or seafood, breaded and deep fried.
* Tempura: deep-fried vegetables or seafood in a light, distinctive batter.
* Tonkatsu: deep-fried breaded cutlet of pork (chicken versions are called chicken katsu).

Grilled and pan-fried dishes
* Gyoza: Chinese ravioli-dumplings (potstickers), usually filled with pork and vegetables and pan-fried.
* Kushiyaki: skewers of meat and vegetables.
* Okonomiyaki: savory pancakes with various meat and vegetable ingredients, flavoured with the likes of Worcestershire sauce or mayonnaise.
* Takoyaki: a spherical, fried dumpling of batter with a piece of octopus inside. Popular street snack.
* Teriyaki: grilled, broiled, or pan-fried meat, fish, chicken or vegetables glazed with a sweetened soy sauce.
* Unagi, including Kabayaki: grilled and flavored eel.
* Yakiniku ("grilled meat"): may refer to several things. Vegetables such as bite-sized onion, carrot, cabbage, mushrooms, and bell pepper are usually grilled together. Grilled ingredients are dipped in a sauce known as tare before being eaten.
* Horumonyaki ("offal-grill"): similar homegrown dish, but using offal
* Genghis Khan barbecue: barbecued lamb or mutton, with various seafoods and vegetables. A speciality of Hokkaid?.
* Yakitori: barbecued chicken skewers, usually served with beer. In Japan, yakitori usually consists of a wide variety of parts of the chicken. It is not usual to see straight chicken meat as the only type of yakitori in a meal.
* Yakizakana: flame-grilled fish, often served with grated daikon. One of the most common dishes served at home. Because of the simple cuisine, fresh fish in season are highly preferable.

Nabemono (one pot "steamboat" cooking)
* Oden: surimi, boiled eggs, daikon radish, konnyaku, and fish cakes stewed in a light, soy-flavoured dashi broth. Common wintertime food and often available in convenience stores.
* Motsunabe: beef offal, Chinese cabbage and various vegetables cooked in a light soup base.
* Shabu-shabu: hot pot with thinly sliced beef, vegetables, and tofu, cooked in a thin stock at the table and dipped in a soy or sesame-based dip before eating.
* Sukiyaki: thinly sliced beef and vegetables cooked in a mixture of soy sauce, dashi, sugar, and sake. Participants cook at the table then dip food into their individual bowls of raw egg before eating it.
* Tecchiri: hot pot with blowfish and vegetables, a specialty of Osaka.

Nimono (stewed dishes)
* Kakuni: chunks of pork belly stewed in soy, mirin and sake with large pieces of daikon and whole boiled eggs. The Okinawan variation, using awamori, soy sauce and miso, is known as rafuti.
* Nikujaga: beef and potato stew, flavoured with sweet soy
* Nizakana: fish poached in sweet soy (often on the menu as "nitsuke")
* s?ki: Okinawan dish of pork stewed with bone

Itamemono (stir-fried dishes)
* Chanpur?: A stir-fry from Okinawa, of vegetables, tofu, meat or seafood and sometimes egg. Many varieties, the most famous being g?y? chanpur?.
* Kinpira gobo: Thin sticks of greater burdock (gobo, ???) and other root vegetables stir-fried and braised in sweetened soy.

Sashimi (
* Fugu: sliced poisonous pufferfish (sometimes lethal), a uniquely Japanese specialty. The chef responsible for preparing it must be licensed.
* Ikizukuri: live sashimi
* Tataki (ja:???): raw/very rare skipjack tuna or beef steak seared on the outside and sliced, or a finely chopped fish, spiced with the likes of chopped spring onions, ginger or garlic paste.
* Basashi (ja:???): horse meat sashimi, sometimes called sakura (?), is a regional speciality in certain areas such as Shinshu (Nagano, Gifu and Toyama prefectures) and Kumamoto.[1] Basashi features on the menu of many izakayas, even on the menus of big national chains.
* Torisashi: chicken breast sashimi, regional specialty of Kagoshima, Miyazaki prefectures.
* Rebasashi: usually liver of calf, completely raw (rare version is called "aburi" (???)), usually dipped in salted sesame oil rather than soy sauce.
* Shikasashi: deer meat sashimi, a rare delicacy in certain parts of Japan, frequently causes acute hepatitis E by eating hunted wild deer.

Soups
* Miso soup: soup made with miso dissolved in dashi, usually containing two or three types of solid ingredients, such as seaweed, vegetables or tofu.
* Tonjiru: similar to Miso soup, except that pork is added to the ingredients
* Dangojiru: soup made with dumplings along with seaweed, tofu, lotus root, or any number of other vegetables and roots
* Imoni: a thick taro potato stew popular in Northern Japan during the autumn season
* Sumashijiru: a clear soup made with dashi and seafood
* Zoni: soup containing mochi rice cakes along with various vegetables and often chicken. It is usually eaten at New Years Day.
* Kiritanpo: freshly cooked rice is pounded, formed into cylinders around cryptomeria skewers, and toasted at an open hearth. The kiritanpo are used as dumplings in soups.

Pickled or salted foods
* Ikura: salt cured salmon caviar.
* Mentaiko: salt-cured pollock roe.
* Shiokara: salty fermented viscera.
* Tsukemono: pickled vegetables, hundreds of varieties and served with most rice-based meals.
* Umeboshi: small, pickled ume fruit. Usually red and very sour, often served with bento lunch boxes or as a filling for onigiri.
* Tsukudani: Very small fish, shellfish or seaweed stewed in sweetened soy for preservation.

Miscellaneous
# Agedashi dofu: cubes of deep-fried silken tofu served in hot broth.
# Bento or Obento: combination meal served in a wooden box, usually as a cold lunchbox.
# Chawan mushi: meat (seafood and/or chicken) and vegetables steamed in egg custard.
# Edamame: boiled and salted pods of soybeans, eaten as a snack, often to accompany beer.
# Himono: dried fish, often aji (?, Japanese jack mackerel). Traditionally served for breakfast with rice, miso soup and pickles.
# Hiyayakko: chilled tofu with garnish.
# Natto: fermented soybeans, stringy like melted cheese, infamous for its strong smell and slippery texture. Often eaten for breakfast.
# Ohitashi: boiled greens such as spinach, chilled and flavoured with soy sauce, often with garnish.
# Osechi: traditional foods eaten at New Year.
# Sunomono: vegetables such as cucumber or wakame, or sometimes crab, marinated in rice vinegar

Japanese-style sweets
* Amanatt is a Japanese traditional confectionery which is made of azuki beans or other beans, covered with refined sugar after simmered with sugar syrup and dried.
* Dango is a Japanese dumpling made from mochiko (rice flour), related to mochi. It is often served with green tea.
* hanabiramochi is a Japanese sweetmeat (wagashi), usually eaten at the beginning of the year.
Hanabiramochi are also served at the first tea ceremony of the new year.
* Higashi , is a type of wagashi, which is dry and contains very little moisture.
* Hoshigaki: Dried persimmon fruit
* Imagawayaki: also known as 'Taikoyaki' is a round Taiyaki and fillings are same
* Kakigori: shaved ice with syrup topping.
* Kompeito: crystal sugar candy
* Manju: sticky rice surrounding a sweet bean center
* Matsunoyuki
* Mochi: steamed sweet rice pounded into a solid, sticky, and somewhat translucent mass
* Oshiruko: a warm, sweet red bean (an) soup with mochi: rice cake
* Uiro: a steamed cake made of rice flour
* Taiyaki: a fried, fish-shaped cake, usually with a sweet filling such as an: red bean paste

Old-fashioned Japanese-style sweets
* Karumetou: Brown sugar cake. Also called Karumeyaki
* Sosu Senbei: Thin wafers eaten with soy sauce
* Mizuame: sticky liquid sugar candy

Western-style sweets (y?gashi, ???)
* Kasutera: "Castella" Iberian-style sponge cake
* Mirukurepu: "mille crepe": layered crepe (in French, "one thousand leaves

Sweets bread
* Anpan: bread with sweet bean paste in the center
* Melonpan: a large, round bun which is a combination of regular dough beneath cookie dough, with a sweet filling in between.






.....that is a lot...how long have u needed to make this list???xD


Three hours. is that bad.


no its not bad...i am really happ that u are doing so much for our group...i will make an extra page for this menu ...is this ok??and if u dont mind i would like to make u moderator^^


actually, I made this for another group. who did a bar theme. but I don't mind shareing it here though. Im also a chef there.


thx for your help^^and do u mind being moderator??


I don't mind.


ok thx


ok. I'll help out more I guess.
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you are a real help
Posted 6/5/08

animebabe007 wrote:

you are a real help


what you think of the flower ideal.
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AmrasPallanen wrote:


animebabe007 wrote:

you are a real help


what you think of the flower ideal.


i love it...great idea^^
should i post pics too??
Posted 6/5/08

animebabe007 wrote:


AmrasPallanen wrote:


animebabe007 wrote:

you are a real help


what you think of the flower ideal.


i love it...great idea^^
should i post pics too??


yes.
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Posted 6/5/08

AmrasPallanen wrote:


animebabe007 wrote:


AmrasPallanen wrote:


animebabe007 wrote:

you are a real help


what you think of the flower ideal.


i love it...great idea^^
should i post pics too??


yes.


ok xD
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Posted 6/5/08
How about drinks? What drinks should we have in our Cafe? Any ideas?
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Cakes









Salad


mexian tacos

cold korean noodles called leng-myun

seafood platter
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dsaddict123 wrote:

How about drinks? What drinks should we have in our Cafe? Any ideas?


yes we need drinks, but unfortunately i have no idea...
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ayumi94 wrote:

Cakes









Salad


mexian tacos

cold korean noodles called leng-myun

seafood platter


can u please upload them in our gallery or should i do this??
and if u give them names i will add them to our menu^^
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Flower Shit ^.^
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jingxuteh wrote:

Flower Shit ^.^


what do u mean by that???
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I want DONUT^^
I LOVE CHOCOLATE DONUT!!!!!

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