Post Reply Learn Nihongo
Deputy Headmistress
9823 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
aceeasi Londra
Offline
Posted 6/10/08 , edited 7/7/08



Welcome to the nihongo class^^

Professors:
1.HaruhiSuzumiya2585
2.emyat126
3.


Students:
1.allaynaGurl
2.Shikuya
3.anime_lover234
4.CrescentAngel360
5.HanaPoolin
6.Jade_994
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
Posted 6/10/08
Wha.. this is Japanese!!!
Member
188 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
27 / F
Offline
Posted 6/10/08
Youkoso! Youkoso means welcome!!! SO I welcome all of you in my class!!! Every session, we'll have a new word to be taught as an extra for the class!

The first random word is... Youkoso!

Lesson Number 1: I like Peaches!!!

This lesson introduces how to express your likes and dislikes in Japanese. This can be a little tricky as the grammar is different from English in this case. In English, one might say: 'I like peaches.' Here like is a verb. In Japanese, an adjective is used instead. For now, it's better to just memorize the pattern for like/dislike sentences.

First, some vocabulary:

liking/fondness - suki (usually pronounced as ski)
dislike/hate - kirai

Again, these two words are not verbs. They are both na adjectives. In English, people don't usually say "I have a fondness for peaches," but this is how it is said in Japanese.

The pattern for like/dislike sentences is as follows:
(Watashi wa) ~ ga suki desu.
I like ~.
(Watashi wa) ~ ga kirai desu.
I hate ~.

Examples:
Watashi wa ringo ga suki desu.
I like apples.
Momo ga suki desu.
I like peaches.
Watashi wa remon ga kirai desu. I hate lemons.
Suika ga kirai desu. I hate watermelon.

Of course, you can change the topic or the desu at the end of the sentence as usual.

Examples:
Watashi wa momo ga suki janai desu.
I don't like peaches.
Banana ga suki janai desu. I don't like bananas.
Suika ga suki dewa arimasen. I don't like watermelon.
Watashi wa kare ga suki deshita. I liked him.
Kare ga kirai janai desu. I don't hate him.
Momo ga kirai dewa arimasen deshita. I didn't hate peaches.
(Anata wa) ringo ga suki desu ka. Do you like apples?
Kono neko wa inu ga kirai desu. This cat hates dogs.

Please note that when you say you like a person in Japanese it has strong connotations that you are interested in the person romantically, so it should not be used lightly until you are more familiar with the language.

Saying that you don't like something, or that you hate something can be a little harsh, so you may wish to add the modifier amari, which, means "very much." (Amari is mostly used this way in negative sentences.) It gives the sentences a connotation of "I don't really like ~."

Examples:
Watashi wa suika ga amari suki janai desu.
I don't like peaches very much.
Banana ga amari suki dewa arimasen. I don't like bananas very much.

Here, we would like to introduce a new form of the word desu. Recall that the negative forms of desu are dewa arimasen and janai desu. Either form means the same thing, but dewa arimasen is more formal. The past tense form is deshita. The only negative past form introduced so far has been dewa arimasen deshita, but that can be quite a mouthful. Also note that you cannot say "janai deshita." The truth is that the nai part of janai is just like the the nai found in i adjectives. So, to make the negative past form you change the nai to nakatta. Thus, it becomes janakatta or janakatta desu. Adding the desu makes the phrase slightly more formal.

Examples:
Watashi wa momo ga suki desu.
I like peaches.
Watashi wa momo ga suki janakatta desu. I didn't like peaches.
Sore wa hon desu. That is a book.
Sore wa hon janakatta desu. That wasn't a book.


Lesson 1 Vocabulary:

suki like
kirai hate
amari very much

ga particle marking the object of like/dislike sentences

momo peach
banana banana
suika watermelon
remon lemon
kare him

janakatta negative past form of desu

Creator/Headmistress
5032 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
28 / F / Glasgow
Offline
Posted 6/16/08
now, may i ask whats the nihongo for ''Students" and "Professors"?
Member
188 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
27 / F
Offline
Posted 6/19/08

Morwien wrote:

now, may i ask whats the nihongo for ''Students" and "Professors"?


Well student in japanese is "kyoushuusei" while for professor is "kyouju"



Member
188 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
27 / F
Offline
Posted 6/19/08 , edited 6/19/08
Lesson 2: It's a...

This simplest structure in Japanese is the "...desu." structure. Desu is usually pronounced 'dess' as the u becomes silent. Simply put, desu means "It is", "Those are", or "I am." ____ desu. It's ___.

Note: In Japanese, cat = neko, dog = inu.
Neko desu.
Inu desu.
John desu.

It's a cat. or Those are cats.
It's a dog. or Those are dogs.
I am John.

There is usually no difference between plural and singular things in Japanese. To distinguish what is being said, one must rely on context or add an adjective to describe how many dogs or cats or whatevers you have.

To make a sentence a question in Japanese, you add "ka" to the end.

Neko desu ka. Is it a cat?
Inu desu ka. Is it a dog?
John-san desu ka. Are you John? Is it John?

Note that the suffix 'san' was added to the end of John when it became a question. This is because you are reffering to someone else, rather than yourself. It is considered polite to add -san to people's names other than your own. Be very carefull not to add it to the end of your own name though, as it is considered very rude and unusual.

To say "It's not a cat." or "I'm not John." you have to use the form dewa arimasen or janai desu. Either form means the same thing, but dewa arimasen is more formal.

Neko dewa arimasen. It's not a cat.
Neko janai desu. It's not a cat.
Inu dewa arimasen. I'ts not a dog.
Inu janai desu. I't's not a dog.
John-san janai desu. I'm not John.



Note: In the example above, you are not John, therefore refering to him with -san is ok.

If someone asks you "Is it a cat?" you can respond with yes (hai) or no (iie).

Neko desu ka?
Hai, neko desu.
Iie, neko dewa arimasen. Is it a cat?
Yes, it is a cat.
No, it's not a cat.

If you don't know what something is, you can point to it and ask "Nan desu ka?"

Nan means 'what', so the sentence means "What is it?" Do not use nan to refer to people. It is very rude.
Examples:

Nan desu ka? What is it?
Inu desu. It's a dog.

Nan desu ka? What is it?
Neko desu. It's a cat.




Lesson 2 Vocabulary:

-san polite ending for other people's names

... desu. It's a ...
... janai desu. It's not a ...
... dewa arimasen. It's not a ...

hai yes
iie no
nan what
ka particle added to the end of a sentence to make it a question

neko cat
inu dog
Member
1699 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
21 / F / Here=.=. Why wher...
Offline
Posted 6/25/08
Dats loads of stuf to learn O_O i think my head hurts while looking at it @o@
Member
188 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
27 / F
Offline
Posted 6/26/08

CrescentAngel360 wrote:

Dats loads of stuf to learn O_O i think my head hurts while looking at it @o@


Just don't strain yourself, you'll get it eventually.

Member
1699 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
21 / F / Here=.=. Why wher...
Offline
Posted 6/26/08

HaruhiSuzumiya2585 wrote:


CrescentAngel360 wrote:

Dats loads of stuf to learn O_O i think my head hurts while looking at it @o@


Just don't strain yourself, you'll get it eventually.



A teachers motivation lol xD
Arigatou gozaimasu Sensei x3
Member
188 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
27 / F
Offline
Posted 6/27/08

CrescentAngel360 wrote:


HaruhiSuzumiya2585 wrote:


CrescentAngel360 wrote:

Dats loads of stuf to learn O_O i think my head hurts while looking at it @o@


Just don't strain yourself, you'll get it eventually.



A teachers motivation lol xD
Arigatou gozaimasu Sensei x3


NO problem!!!
You must be logged in to post.