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Canadian copyright.
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23 / M / Canada, Vancouver
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Posted 6/14/08
The new bill in Canada....

"Industry minister tabling copyright amendments bill
Posted By BY THE CANADIAN PRESS



The federal government is expected to introduce legislation today that will seek to make it easier to prosecute individuals who download copyrighted material from the Internet.

Industry Minister Jim Prentice said in an a release from his office late Wednesday that he will table amendments to the Copyright Law in the House of Commons this morning.

The bill, which will amend the existing Copyright Act, was first put on the House of Commons order paper in December, but then was held in limbo for the next six months as speculation built about what it contained.

The long-awaited changes are a hot political potato for Prentice, who must find a middle ground between business interests who want strict protection for intellectual property, including recordings and films, and Internet users accustomed to downloading material free.

There is speculation Prentice will try to come down the middle as much as possible, imposing a $500 fine on individuals caught downloading copyrighted files.

The current copyright law, which was intended to catch commercial cheaters, carries a maximum fine of $20,000 for infringements.

If such a fine were to be included in the amendments, it would likely leave both sides unhappy -- industry groups that the fine is small, consumers that the fine applies to each file download.

University of Ottawa professor Michael Geist, who teaches technology law, said he is concerned the amendments will mirror too closely the restrictive legislation in the United States.

"I expect Minister Prentice to characterize the law as a Made in Canada solution, yet the reality will be that the key provisions are born in the USA," he said.

"In doing so, the new law will have serious negative effects for Canadian consumers who could be locked out of their own purchased content, as well as for privacy, education and research."

Geist said he expects some provisions aimed at pleasing consumer interests such as the legalizing of recording time-shifted television shows, but that most of the new rules will be contrary to consumer interests.

UPDATE

From industry Canada website http://www.ic.gc.ca/cmb/welcomeic.nsf/0/85...54?OpenDocument

Government of Canada Proposes Update to Copyright Law: Balanced Approach to Truly Benefit CanadiansOTTAWA, June 12, 2008 --Today the Government of Canada introduced long-overdue and much-needed amendments to the Copyright Act that will bring it in line with advances in technology and current international standards.

"Our government has committed to ensuring Canada's copyright law is up to date, and today we are delivering by introducing this "made-in-Canada" bill that balances the interests of Canadians who use digital technology and those who create content," said the Honourable Jim Prentice, Minister of Industry. "It's a win-win approach because we're ensuring that Canadians can use digital technologies at home with their families, at work, or for educational and research purposes. We are also providing new rights and protections for Canadians who create the content and who want to better secure their work online."

"These proposed amendments represent the first major reform of the Copyright Act in more than a decade. In that time, the Internet and other new technologies have radically changed the way we produce and access copyright material," said the Honourable Josée Verner, Minister of Canadian Heritage, Status of Women and Official Languages and Minister for La Francophonie. "Canadians are known around the world for their creativity and ingenuity, and many of their ideas are found in the books we read, the music we listen to, the movies we watch, and the new digital technology we use in our day-to-day lives. Our balanced copyright reform builds on these successes."

Today's announcement follows the government's commitment in the 2007 Speech from the Throne to proceed with copyright reform. The proposed amendments include:


new exceptions that will allow Canadian consumers to legally record television shows for later viewing and copy legally acquired music onto other devices, such as iPods or cellphones;
new exceptions for some educational and research purposes;
new rights and protections for those who create content; and
provisions to address the liability of Internet service providers and the role they should play in curbing copyright-infringing activities on their networks.

Four principles motivated the government in the development of the proposed changes to the Copyright Act:

1. The rights of those who hold copyright must be balanced with the needs of users to access copyright works.

2. The Copyright Act must provide clear, predictable and fair rules to allow Canadians to derive benefits from their creations.

3. The Copyright Act should foster innovation in an effort to attract investment and high-paying jobs to Canada.

4. Canada must ensure that its copyright framework for the Internet is in line with international standards.

These amendments to the Copyright Act are part of the government's broader intellectual property strategy, which includes the recent amendments to the Criminal Code to combat movie piracy and the announcement that Canada will work with other international trading partners towards a possible Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA)."

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23 / M / Canada, Vancouver
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Posted 6/14/08
The federal government has introduced a controversial bill it says balances the rights of copyright holders and consumers — but it opens millions of Canadians to huge lawsuits, prompting critics to warn it will create a "police state."

"We are confident we have developed the proper framework at this point in time," Minister of Industry Jim Prentice told a news conference in Ottawa on Thursday. "This bill reflects a win-win approach."

However, Liberal industry critic Scott Brison blasted the government for its lack of consultation with Canadian stakeholders and for not considering the implications of the bill if it passes.

"There's no excuse for why the government has not consulted broadly the diverse stakeholders," he said. "The government has not thought this through. It has not thought about how it will enforce these provisions."

"There's a fine line between protecting creators and a police state."

Bill C-61 spells out consumers' rights in how they are allowed to copy media and clears up some grey areas. Existing laws do not specifically allow consumers to copy books, newspapers, periodicals, photographs, videocassettes and music. The new bill would expressly allow them to make one copy of each item per device owned, such as a computer or MP3 player. The bill would also expressly allow consumers to record television and radio programs for later viewing.

The Conservatives' bill, however, also contains an anti-circumvention clause that will make it illegal to break digital locks on copyrighted material, which critics say could trump all of the new allowances. CD and DVD makers could put copy protections on their discs, or television networks could attach technological flags to programs that would prevent them from being recorded onto TiVos and other personal video recorders.

Cellphones would also be locked down, so when consumers buy a device from one carrier, they would be unable to use it with another. Breaking any of these locks could result in lawsuits seeking up to $20,000 in damages.

University of Ottawa internet law professor Michael Geist, a vocal opponent of the legislation, said the anti-circumvention clause invalidates all the other new provisions.

"They've got a few headline-grabbing reforms but the reality is those are also undermined by this anti-circumvention legislation. They've essentially provided digital rights to the U.S. and entertainment lobby and a few analog rights to Canadians," Geist told CBCNews.ca. "The truth of the matter is the reforms are laden with all sorts of limitations and in some cases rendered inoperable."

Cory Doctorow, co-editor of the influential Boing Boing blog, said the anti-circumvention clause will lead to a revival of digital rights management, or the software that prevents media from being copied. The entertainment industry has for the past few years been moving away from protecting its content with DRM because consumers have shied away from buying restricted media.

"You have to wonder what they're smoking on Parliament Hill if they think there's this compelling need for DRM, given that the marketplace seems to be rejecting it left, right and centre," he told CBCNews.ca.
YouTube uploads could bring lawsuits

People caught downloading music or video files illegally could also be sued for a maximum of $500, but uploading a file to a peer-to-peer network or YouTube could result in lawsuits of $20,000 per file.

Canadian internet service providers, meanwhile, would continue to be immune to lawsuits from copyright holders for infringements over their networks. The bill recognizes ISPs as intermediaries and would only require them to pass on violation notices from copyright holders to their customers.

Prentice deflected questions about potential lawsuits by saying the bill is necessary to modernize Canada's laws and bring it up to date with its obligations under the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) treaty it signed more than a decade ago.

"You can get into hypothetical situations," he said, "but the purpose of the bill has been to expand the balance of protection between consumers and copyright holders."

"In fact, it touches each and every one of us, and it is no surprise to find so many different points of view with respect to copyright," he said.

The bill will receive its second reading after Parliament's summer break, which is expected to begin soon. Brison told CBCNews.ca that the Liberals plan to put together amendments to the bill over the summer.
Bill praised by video game, music industry groups

Some copyright holders voiced their support for the bill. The Entertainment Software Association of Canada, the video game industry's lobby group, praised the legislation for trying to protect Canada's industries and artists from theft.

“It’s simple: Every time someone acquires an illegal copy of a video game, money, in turn, is not going to those Canadians who work so hard to develop and publish games. That’s money that cannot be reinvested in creativity, job growth and industry development,” Joan Ramsay, president of the group's board of directors, said in a statement. “Copyright reform is essential to strengthen our competitiveness as an industry.”

A coalition of eight music lobby groups, including the Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists (ACTRA) and the Canadian Recording Industry Association (CRIA), jointly thanked the government for tabling a bill it said was long overdue. The coalition said it represents 21,000 performers and 15,000 musicians, artist managers, music publishers, music retailers, manufacturers, record labels, and distributors and retailers of musical instruments.

"Vocal opponents of this bill will characterize it as mimicking what's already been done in the U.S., but that's oversimplifying things," Stephen Waddell, ACTRA's national executive director, said in a statement. "Around the world, 64 countries have already implemented the WIPO copyright treaties. Canada is at least going in the direction of finally catching up."
Prices of computers, iPods could jump

Intellectual property experts said the bill is mixed in the benefits it would provide and the problems it would create.

Mark Hayes, partner in the intellectual property group of Blake, Cassels & Graydon LLP in Toronto, said ISPs — which got the exemption from prosecution they wanted — and educational institutions, which would be able to copy materials from the internet that they previously could not, were among the winners. Consumers would also benefit because what they can do with their media has now been spelled out.

"They get some recognition of the rights to time shift and format shift," he said. "Before, nobody knew what the rules were."

Among the losers could be consumers shopping for electronics devices. Although the bill allows consumers to make a certain number of copies of their media, copyright owners could seek extra charges for the additional copies that will doubtlessly be made.

"Owners of computers and iPods could end up paying quite a bit more for those products in the future," Hayes said.
Downloading on the rise

According to the latest survey from Statistics Canada, one in five Canadians aged 16 and older who used the internet at home said they had downloaded or watched TV or movies over the internet, an increase from 12 per cent in 2005.

The percentage of home internet users who downloaded music — either paid or for free — also increased from 37 per cent to 45 per cent in the two-year span. Part of that increase can be attributed to a change in methodology, as Statistics Canada for the first time included 16- and 17-year-olds in the study, a demographic more likely to download media than older groups.

Critics feared the bill will mirror the U.S. Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), which similarly brought in restrictive measures and opened the door for copyright owners to enact huge lawsuits against violators.

The minister was forced to retreat on introducing the bill in December after being hit with major public opposition. More than 20,000 people joined a protest group started on social networking site Facebook by University of Ottawa internet and e-commerce Prof. Michael Geist, an outspoken critic of the bill.

The opposition to the legislation has only grown since then, with the Facebook group counting more than 40,000 members before the bill was introduced. More than 1,000 new members joined the group on Thursday, with many expressing their outrage with the proposed legislation.

"I was a Conservative until this morning. This one has crossed the line," one member wrote. "We need an election. NOW!"

Canadian artists, librarians and students, as well as a business coalition made up of some of Canada's biggest companies — including Rogers Communications Inc. and Telus Corp., as well as Google Inc. and Yahoo Inc. — have expressed their opposition to any legislation that imposes harsh copyright restrictions.
Opposition widespread

The chorus of opposition was joined last week by a coalition of consumer groups — including Option consommateurs, Consumers Council of Canada, Public Interest Advocacy Centre (PIAC), the Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC), and Online Rights Canada (OnlineRights.ca) — that wrote a letter to the government. The consumer groups expressed dismay they had not been consulted on the legislation.

Prentice responded to questioning in the House of Commons last week by saying he would not introduce the bill until he and Heritage Minister Josée Verner were satisfied that it struck the right balance between consumers and copyright holders.

Geist has repeatedly attacked the government on his blog for its lack of public consultation on the issue. However, Prentice has met with U.S. trade representatives and entertainment industry lobbyists to discuss the legislation.

"Prentice should be honest about the core anti-circumvention rules that are likely to mirror the DMCA and run counter to the concerns of business, education and consumer groups," Geist wrote on his blog. "Those rules are quite clearly 'Born in the USA.'"
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34 / M / Pinsnotch2
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Posted 6/14/08
fuck canada they just want the tax money from the things that should've been been rather than downloaded for free
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25 / M / in my mystery world
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Posted 6/14/08
huh r we sapose to read this if so i didn't itll take up 2 much of my time
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22 / M / Montreal
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Posted 6/14/08
i dont feel like reading but im sure ill be really pissed off
Posted 6/14/08
Too long to read.

Too bad for the people in Canada.
Posted 6/14/08
sounds very unfriendly
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33 / F / California
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Posted 6/14/08
It feels like Singapore really got to a lot of countries. It even influence Canada to adopt a stricter a copy right infringement. Well, that is what I am getting out of this but I also didn't read about half of it.
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M / ♥♥♥♥♥♥♥
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Posted 6/14/08
tl;dr: they're being douches about copyright laws.
Goddammit I better still be able to download shit.
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41 / M / southern ontario
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Posted 6/14/08
I am canadian and they can stick that law up their collective asses - still gonna download - and how are they going to catch people anyways?


Alter-Divide wrote:

Too long to read.

Too bad for the people in Canada.


and its going to be too bad for you, cause this shit is going to hit everywhere (really gonna hurt when japan goes all apeshit on this stuff)
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23 / M / Canada, Vancouver
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Posted 6/14/08
http://www.cbc.ca/technology/story/2008/06/12/tech-copyright.html

For the original source.
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31 / M / Iloilo City, PH
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Posted 6/14/08

MidnightTide wrote:

I am canadian and they can stick that law up their collective asses - still gonna download - and how are they going to catch people anyways?

and its going to be too bad for you, cause this shit is going to hit everywhere (really gonna hurt when japan goes all apeshit [/b]on this stuff)



meh.. same here still gonna download stuff.. (campus bootlegger) my wallet will die if i don't. Lol on the part where japan goes ape shit.. so long veoh, so long crunchyroll, so long youtube!! wahahahahahaha dunno about the kids but i still have other sources both online and offline of stuff. since i don't watch anything online unless it involves the letters XXX on it.
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28 / M / BC, Canada
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Posted 6/16/08
I looked on the cbc news and they had a poll.

IF the law was made now. Would you abide by it?

10% said yes

90% said no

This bill will not pass.
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69 / M / Limbo
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Posted 6/16/08 , edited 6/16/08
Torrents forever! Call me the net baron...
Posted 6/16/08
can someone explain this?
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