First  Prev  1  2  Next  Last
Post Reply The Fox Group
Foxers
1386 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / F
Offline
Posted 7/4/08 , edited 7/11/08
Fox's are dominate to all the other animal's dont you agree foxes ^^?

Heres our Mascots ;P


[Fennec Fox Mascot]



[Red Fox Mascot]



[Artic Fox Mascot]




[Kit Fox Mascot]




[Gray Fox Mascot]



Foxers
1386 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / F
Offline
Posted 7/4/08
Since bunny's and wolve's get facts we should get facts to,right?

-Most Fox's live 3 to 2 years or up to 6 years in the wild
-Fox's survive 10 years or even LONGER in captivity*sad isnt it *
-We're generally smaller than the other Canine
-Fox's are typically solitary,opportunistic feeders,and they hunt live prey.
-Fox's kill Very fast.
-Fox's usually carry their tails straight back when running and lowered when walking.Weird Huh?
-Fox's are like cat's more than dogs.
-They DON'T hibernate or go into deep sleep.
-They Often sleep out in the open.
-Foxes make an odd assortment of sounds, many unlike other canids:

A coughing bark as an alarm;
A series of three, four, or five sharp barks as a call;
A grumbling, throaty, staccato stutter when on the defense (gekkering);
A drawn-out monotone wail during mating season;
Various other noises such as hissing, squeaking, chirping, and even purring.
Foxes rarely, if ever, growl.

-Foxes are rarely a danger to humans. But advise your cats and bunnies to look over their shoulders.

-Fox's can't breed with other animal's except its on species due to it's genetic code


-Fox species include the red fox, the gray fox, the arctic fox, the kit fox and the fennec fox.

-A group of foxes is called a “skulk.”

-Foxes usually have 4-5 pups, born in the spring.

-The fox is the smallest member of the dog family.

-The fox is a solitary animal and usually hunts alone, rather than in packs like wolves or dogs.



Posted 7/4/08
YAY!!!!!!! xD
Foxers
1386 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / F
Offline
Posted 7/5/08

animefanfreakk wrote:

YAY!!!!!!! xD


Thats right YAY FOX'S FOREVER >:D!!!
Member
3035 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / M / In a abandon Chur...
Offline
Posted 7/5/08

Lilcloe wrote:


animefanfreakk wrote:

YAY!!!!!!! xD


Thats right YAY FOX'S FOREVER >:D!!!


HA ZA
Heres some info on the red fox, sorry for all the reading =P

The largest species within the genus Vulpes, the Red Fox may reach an adult weight of 3–14 kg (6.6–30.8 lb), but this varies from region to region; foxes living in Canada and Alaska tend to be larger than foxes in the United Kingdom, which are in turn larger than those inhabiting the Southern United States. Head and body length is 18 to 33.75 in (46 to 86 cm), with a tail of 12 to 21.75 in (30.5 to 55.5 cm) Size can be estimated from tracks. Red Fox footprints are normally about 4.4 cm (1¾ inch) wide and 5.7 cm (2¼ inch) long. A normal Red Fox's trotting stride is about 33-38 cm (13-15 inch).

The Red Fox is most commonly a rusty red, with white underbelly, black ear tips and legs, and a bushy tail usually with a distinctive white tip. The "red" tone can vary from dark chestnut to golden, and in fact can be "agouti", with bands of red, brown, black and white on each individual hair. In North America, the Red Fox's pelt has long, soft hair, whereas the fur of European Red Foxes is flatter and less silky. In the wild, two other colour phases are also seen. The first is silver or black, comprising 10% of the wild population. Approximately 30% of wild individuals have additional dark patterning, which usually manifests as bold markings on the face, with a stripe across the shoulders and down the centre of the back. The stripes form a "cross" over the shoulders, and these foxes are therefore often called cross foxes. Farmed stock are mostly silver, but may be almost any colour including spotted or blotched with white.

Fox eyes are gold to yellow and have distinctive vertical-slit pupils, similar to those of domestic cats. Their eyesight is also as sharp as that of a feline[citation needed], and combined with their extreme agility for a canid, the Red Fox has been referred to as "the cat-like canid". Its long bushy tail with distinctive white tip provides balance for large jumps and complex movement. Its strong legs allow it to reach speeds of approximately 48 km/h (30 miles per hour), a great benefit to catching prey or evading predators.

In general, the spacing between the canine teeth is approximately 11⁄16–1 ″ (18 to 25 mm) apart. Foxes lack the facial muscles necessary to bare their teeth, unlike most other canids.

During the autumn and winter, the Red Fox will grow more fur. This so-called "winter fur" keeps the animal warm in the colder environment. The fox sheds this fur at the onset of spring, reverting back to the short fur for the duration of the summer.

Red Foxes are largely carnivorous. The majority of their diet consists of invertebrates, such as insects, mollusks, earthworms and crayfish. They do also eat some plant material, especially blackberries, apples, plums and other fruit. Common vertebrate prey includes rodents (such as mice and voles), rabbits, birds, eggs, amphibians, small reptiles and fish. Foxes have been known to kill deer fawns. In Scandinavia, predation by Red Fox is the most important mortality cause for neonatal Roe deer. They will scavenge carrion and other edible material they find, and in urban areas, they will scavenge on human refuse, even eating from pet food bowls left outside. Analysis of country and urban fox diets show that urban foxes have a higher proportion of scavenged food than country foxes. They typically eat 0.5–1 kg (1–2 lb) of food a day.

They usually hunt alone. With their acute sense of hearing, they can locate small mammals in thick grass, and they jump high in the air to pounce on the prey. They also stalk prey such as rabbits, keeping hidden until close enough to catch them in a short dash. Foxes tend to be extremely possessive of their food and will not share it with others. Exceptions to this rule include dog foxes feeding vixens during courtship and vixens feeding cubs.

Red Foxes have proportionately small stomachs for their size and can only eat half as much food in relation to their body weight as wolves and dogs can (about 10% compared with 20%). In periods of abundance, foxes will cache excess food against starvation at other times. They typically store the food in shallow holes (5–10 cm deep). Foxes tend to make many small caches, scattering them across their territories rather than storing their food in a single central location. This is thought to prevent the loss of the fox's entire food supply in the event that another animal finds the store.

In general, each fox claims its own territory; it pairs up only in winter, foraging alone in the summer. Territories may be as large as 50 km² (19 square miles); ranges are much smaller (less than 12 km², 4.6 sq mi)) in habitats with abundant food sources, however. Several dens are utilized within these territories; dens may be claimed from previous residents such as marmots, or dug anew. A larger main den is used for winter living, birthing and rearing of young; smaller dens are dispersed throughout the territory for emergency and food storage purposes. A series of tunnels often connects them with the main den. One fox may only need a square kilometre of land marked by recognition posts that are special smells that come from a scent gland located just above a fox's tail.

The Red Fox has been considered a monogamous species, however evidence for polygamy (polygyny and polyandry) includes males’ extra-territorial movements during breeding season (possibly searching for additional mates) and males’ home ranges overlapping two or more females’ home ranges. Such variability is thought to be linked to variation in the spatial availability of key resources such as food.

The Red Fox primarily forms monogamous pairs each winter, which cooperate to raise a litter of 4–6 kits (also called pups) each year; but in various locales and for various incompletely explored reasons they may also practice polygamy (multiple males sharing a single female and/or vice versa). Young foxes disperse promptly on maturity (approx. 8–10 months).

The reason for this "group living" behaviour is not well understood; some researchers believe the non-breeders boost the survival rate of the litters while others believe there is no significant difference, and such arrangements are made spontaneously due to a resource surplus.

Socially, the fox communicates with body language and a variety of vocalizations. Its vocal range is quite large and its noises vary from a distinctive three-yip "lost call" to a shriek reminiscent of a human scream. It also communicates with scent, marking food and territorial boundary lines with urine and faeces.

John James Audubon noted that cross foxes tended to be shyer than their fully red counterparts. He conjectured that the reason was due to the greater commercial value its fur, thus forcing it to adopt a warier behaviour in order to evade hunters

The Red Fox has both positive and negative standing with humans, often being loved or hated. This has been most visible in the United Kingdom where fox hunting with dogs was a traditional sport and an occasional localised means of culling, until this was made illegal in Scotland in August, 2002, and in England and Wales in February, 2005. The fox features in much folklore (see Reynard), usually as a wily villain, though sometimes also as the underdog who triumphs over human efforts to control or destroy it.

Like other wild animals, foxes are considered vectors of disease. The Red Fox helps farmers by preying on animals that damage crops but is considered to be a pest by farmers involved in poultry farming. In some places,[vague] the Red Fox is used as a food animal.

Greater visibility in nature documentaries and sympathetic portrayals in fiction have improved the Red Fox's reputation and appeal in recent years.

In Hong Kong, it is a protected species under Wild Animals Protection Ordinance Cap

Red Foxes are generally considered to be the most serious predator of free range poultry. The safest option known in poultry protection is to keep the flock and the fox physically separated, usually with fencing. A fence needs to be at least 2 m high in order to keep out most foxes, though on some rare occasions, a determined fox might succeed in climbing over. Surplus killing will often occur in enclosed spaces such as huts, with discarded feathers and headless bodies usually being the main indicators of fox predation.

Although poultry is the most commonly-taken domesticated prey, Red Foxes will on some occasions kill young or small animals, particularly lambs and kids. In exceptional circumstances, they may attack sub-adult and adult sheep and goats and sometimes small calves. Foxes will usually kill lambs or kids by repeatedly biting the neck and back, which is usually the result from young animals being caught while lying down. Other than with poultry, fox predation on livestock can be distinguished from dog or coyote predation by the fact that foxes rarely cause severe ossular damage when feeding. Red Foxes also are noted for carrying small carcasses back to their dens to feed their young which may account for some poultry, lambs and kids that disappear and are never found. Scientific studies in Britain found that between 0.5 % and 3 % of otherwise viable lambs may be taken by foxes, described as a small amount when compared to the mortality caused by exposure, starvation and disease


Member
3035 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / M / In a abandon Chur...
Offline
Posted 7/5/08
I almost forgot about in culture

The emblematic Red Fox is a frequent player in the stories of many cultures. A trickster character, the word Sly is almost invariably associated with foxes in English, and the connotation of a sneaking intelligence (or even magic powers of stealth) are seen in traditional tales of Europe, Japan, China, and North America (though here the Coyote usually plays this role).

In the European fable tradition, running from Aesop's Fables, to Jean de La Fontaine's Fabliaux and the Reynard tales, the fox ranges from immoral villain (as the Fox in the hen house), to sly operator (either foolish or crafty), to wise observer (as a mouthpiece for the moral in some Aesop tales) to clever underdog (exemplified by the Reynard tradition). Some historians argue that the fox came to symbolise the survival strategies of European peasantry from the Medieval period to the French Revolution. Peasants admired guile and wit needed to out manoeuvre the powers of aristocracy, state and church, just as they saw the fox use these same qualities to raid their livestock under cover of darkness
Foxers
1386 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / F
Offline
Posted 7/5/08

Fallen-Ange1 wrote:

I almost forgot about in culture

The emblematic Red Fox is a frequent player in the stories of many cultures. A trickster character, the word Sly is almost invariably associated with foxes in English, and the connotation of a sneaking intelligence (or even magic powers of stealth) are seen in traditional tales of Europe, Japan, China, and North America (though here the Coyote usually plays this role).

In the European fable tradition, running from Aesop's Fables, to Jean de La Fontaine's Fabliaux and the Reynard tales, the fox ranges from immoral villain (as the Fox in the hen house), to sly operator (either foolish or crafty), to wise observer (as a mouthpiece for the moral in some Aesop tales) to clever underdog (exemplified by the Reynard tradition). Some historians argue that the fox came to symbolise the survival strategies of European peasantry from the Medieval period to the French Revolution. Peasants admired guile and wit needed to out manoeuvre the powers of aristocracy, state and church, just as they saw the fox use these same qualities to raid their livestock under cover of darkness


NOOOOOOOO EVEN WHEN ITS SUMMER I'M STILL IN SCHOOL AHHHHHHHHHH*runs*
Foxers
1386 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / F
Offline
Posted 7/6/08

Fallen-Ange1 wrote:

I almost forgot about in culture

The emblematic Red Fox is a frequent player in the stories of many cultures. A trickster character, the word Sly is almost invariably associated with foxes in English, and the connotation of a sneaking intelligence (or even magic powers of stealth) are seen in traditional tales of Europe, Japan, China, and North America (though here the Coyote usually plays this role).

In the European fable tradition, running from Aesop's Fables, to Jean de La Fontaine's Fabliaux and the Reynard tales, the fox ranges from immoral villain (as the Fox in the hen house), to sly operator (either foolish or crafty), to wise observer (as a mouthpiece for the moral in some Aesop tales) to clever underdog (exemplified by the Reynard tradition). Some historians argue that the fox came to symbolise the survival strategies of European peasantry from the Medieval period to the French Revolution. Peasants admired guile and wit needed to out manoeuvre the powers of aristocracy, state and church, just as they saw the fox use these same qualities to raid their livestock under cover of darkness

Also thankz :P

Posted 7/6/08 , edited 7/9/08
~The scientific name of the red fox is Vulpes vulpes.
~Fox species include the red fox, the gray fox, the arctic fox, the kit fox and the fennec fox.
~A group of foxes is called a “skulk.”
~Foxes usually have 4-5 pups, born in the spring.
~Foxes are primarily carnivores and primarily feed upon rodents such as rabbits, mice, squirrels, etc.
~The red fox is the most common species of the foxes.
~The fox is the smallest member of the dog family.
~The fox is a solitary animal and usually hunts alone, rather than in packs like wolves or dogs.

Foxes live on large territories, which they mark by scent -- urine or musk from several glands on their body. In a town, foxes can also occupy a smaller territory or even accept other foxes in their territory. Foxes may share their territories with wolves and eagles, they sometimes even follow wolves to catch leftovers from their prey. Coyotes, however are avoided by foxes.
Wolves, coyotes, lynx and eagles are his natural enemies and may kill him when they find him -- to save their own territories.
The eagle even kills foxes for food.
Member
3035 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / M / In a abandon Chur...
Offline
Posted 7/6/08

Lilcloe wrote:


Fallen-Ange1 wrote:

I almost forgot about in culture

The emblematic Red Fox is a frequent player in the stories of many cultures. A trickster character, the word Sly is almost invariably associated with foxes in English, and the connotation of a sneaking intelligence (or even magic powers of stealth) are seen in traditional tales of Europe, Japan, China, and North America (though here the Coyote usually plays this role).

In the European fable tradition, running from Aesop's Fables, to Jean de La Fontaine's Fabliaux and the Reynard tales, the fox ranges from immoral villain (as the Fox in the hen house), to sly operator (either foolish or crafty), to wise observer (as a mouthpiece for the moral in some Aesop tales) to clever underdog (exemplified by the Reynard tradition). Some historians argue that the fox came to symbolise the survival strategies of European peasantry from the Medieval period to the French Revolution. Peasants admired guile and wit needed to out manoeuvre the powers of aristocracy, state and church, just as they saw the fox use these same qualities to raid their livestock under cover of darkness


NOOOOOOOO EVEN WHEN ITS SUMMER I'M STILL IN SCHOOL AHHHHHHHHHH*runs*


lol and np
Posted 7/7/08
ummm where do i sign up to be in the fox group????
Foxers
1386 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / F
Offline
Posted 7/7/08

ikuto4ever101 wrote:

ummm where do i sign up to be in the fox group????


Go to the forum Group Sign Ups
Member
3035 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / M / In a abandon Chur...
Offline
Posted 7/8/08
Hey should we have a Fox song? If so then I got one =P
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YC1vVioMu6A
Poets of the Fall - Carnival of Rust
Just ignore the wolf rain =P
Posted 7/9/08
hmmmmmmm :::::::toses in a rabbit::::::::
Member
3701 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
M
Online
Posted 7/9/08
wow some nice info on foxes ^^
First  Prev  1  2  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.