Post Reply Forms or No Forms?
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Posted 7/19/08 , edited 7/19/08
Many arts employ some sort of form based training.
Kata are used in many japanese arts, Poomse are used in Korean arts, Jurus are used in Indonesian arts.
Some would argue that these are essential for hardwiring core techniques, principles, concepts and theories and are useful for training without a partner. Others would suggest that they have had their day and that training should only be done in a practical and pragmatic way...

Thoughts?
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Posted 7/19/08
both.., but it all depends on the individual. but I thought you were talking about form as in stance... forms do help with the foundation, and i agree it does help especially when you dont have a partner.. but if you dont apply what's in the form, then what? you gotta put that in your sparring, or in your techniques.. if you didn't learn a kata.. you find another way to home your skill.. like in shadowboxing... but the pragmatic way is necessary.. you gotta test your skill.. apply them
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Posted 7/19/08
Poomse for me, are like a form of meditation. The place I go in my mind that is where my body connects with my mind. Like you said Ice, "hard-wiring" my techniques for when I fight. In the Bushido, they mention that preforming a task over and over again makes for true perfection and a resreve of power, or power in repose. That's what I think of when I do forms. Like a Japanese tea ceremony, each movement becoming more and more perfect until every bit of unnecessary motion is removed and the poomse becomes perfection and my body is unconciusly trained to use any combination of moves at any time when needed.
I know 12 poomse inside and out, soon to learn 13. The more you learn, the easier it is to learn them I have found too! At the begining, you wonder how you will ever be able to memorize the first one or two!
My husband teases poomse..calls it dancing. But Im a good fighter and I believe I owe alot of that to being dedicated to my forms!
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Posted 8/9/08
Forms is a good way to perfect ur techniques wen preperly done but u also need the know the terminology behind it like wat each technique dose and wen u can apply it so forms are thumbs up for me.
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Posted 8/14/08
Great feedback!
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Posted 9/23/08
forms is a must.. >:3 forms also ar the proper execution of strikes.. not only the stance. but the proper way to deliver blows :3
if ur form is bad -.- = injuries, off balancing, u look awkward and not power enough blows >:3
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Posted 10/16/08
some ppl don't like forms.. when im with others.. they hate when i drill them.
but i believe if you perfect your form..if you do it again, and again.. then subconciously
it wil reflect in even your life.. it teaches you a sense of discipline to calm down.. do it again.. and when you're down. that's it
or you can keep going to discover more about what you can do..
Posted 10/16/08


Ice_Blue_Eyes wrote:

Many arts employ some sort of form based training.
Kata are used in many japanese arts, Poomse are used in Korean arts, Jurus are used in Indonesian arts.
Some would argue that these are essential for hardwiring core techniques, principles, concepts and theories and are useful for training without a partner. Others would suggest that they have had their day and that training should only be done in a practical and pragmatic way...

Thoughts?


What would be the practical and pragmatic way?

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Posted 10/18/08

Raze22 wrote:



Ice_Blue_Eyes wrote:

Many arts employ some sort of form based training.
Kata are used in many japanese arts, Poomse are used in Korean arts, Jurus are used in Indonesian arts.
Some would argue that these are essential for hardwiring core techniques, principles, concepts and theories and are useful for training without a partner. Others would suggest that they have had their day and that training should only be done in a practical and pragmatic way...

Thoughts?


What would be the practical and pragmatic way?



just go into the attacking and defending and learn technique just by that.. or by forms which can show things but in concepts to applications
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