First  Prev  1  2  Next  Last
Post Reply drawing tutorials wings
Creator
3082 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
30 / M / phoenix, az
Offline
Posted 7/24/08
Finally we're going to start drawing wings here! Lets start with some basic shapes to get the fundamental parts of wings sketched out before we go into adding individual layers of feathers. For non-tablet users, you have two options: draw your wings out on paper and scan them in you desire to digitally ink/color them, or patiently sketch out rough outlines with your mouse and vector-ink over your sketch...

1. Start with an oval and then draw another oval that is slightly bigger than it, to the right about an inch and down about a centimeter or so. Connect the top parts of each oval as shown, with slightly curved lines (sounds weird when explained, but the picture details this).

2. Then draw a larger and more stretched oval about an inch from your last oval. Make it almost double the height of your first oval, as shown in the picture. Connect the tops of the second and third ovals like you did in step one (again, refer to the image, as it sounds much most complex than it is).

3. This part can be varied a lot, so it is up to you to decide how you want the flight feathers to be here. I made mine semi-long, with a span from the oval to the furthest tip of the last feather being about 2 inches. You can shorten your flight feathers or elongate them for a certain look, if you know how you want your wings to look. The shape I drew is sort of a semi circle at a slant, but that should be easy enough to draw the general shape of.

4. Now, erase all the lines inside of your wing shape (all the ovals, basically). Now we can being to add in the feathers. When adding feathers, I usually start with the inner-most part of the wing and work my way out to the large flight feathers. Here, I started at the left, outlining the shape of the feathers at the bottom (red). I made these feathers small, but stopped right as I got to about the spot of the second oval that I had drawn. From here, I started to outline the bottom feathers, but I made them noticeably longer and a bit wider than before (orange). When I got to about the spot of the third oval, I stopped and went back to the left. Since I had all the outlines done for most of the fluffy, inner feathers, I could now start adding in the small, down feathers that lie in the region above (yellow). Don't be over zealous when adding these feathers though --- as you can see, I left a considerable amount of open space near the top of this region. Why? Because the feathers gradually get smaller and smaller as you get closer to the top of the wing, where the muscle and bones are. When the feathers get that small, it is okay (and looks best) to not draw them out. You can add a few for some texture though! I continued to add in the inner feather layer along the inside of the wing, and then I got to the region just passed the third oval area. The inner feathers here (green) fan out more and are larger than those in the previous region (yellow). These feathers are about the same size as those in the orange region, but taper off as you get closer to the top of the wing. Next I went and drew in the primary flight feathers. From left to right, they get larger and more spread apart. The inner most feathers in blue are shorter and will hug the bottom curve of the reference line you drew. They are usually more closely drawn together here, and fan out as you proceed right. Then I went ahead and added some fluff (purple) to the shoulder area and the wrist area of the wing.

Phew, that was a long explanation. Hopefully it wasn't too hard to follow for you. Feather placement is vital to practice, as it can make or break your wing design (in my opinion). Your wings will look elegant if you use rounded lines for delicate feathers, and your wings will look sharp/course if you use rigid lines with sharper, more square ends for your feathers. As I said before, you should play around with the shapes of your feathers to get the effect that you desire.
Creator
3082 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
30 / M / phoenix, az
Offline
Posted 7/24/08
So maybe now you want to have more than one set of wings on your character? If that is the case, or you are just having trouble placing the wings on the backs of your characters, here is a section of the tutorial for you.

The girl on the left has a more-or-less typical set of double wings. The most common place to attach your main pair of wings would be on or around the shoulder blade area on your character's back. The wings sprouting from this area should be your character's main flight wings, and should be the largest in comparison to the other pair(s) below it. Suggested placement for your primary wing pair is shown in green, with the secondary wing pair just below. The most important thing about secondary and tertiary (etc.) wing sets is that they point downwards, unlike the primary wing set. Why? Well, physiologically, the primary wings would take priority, since they are used to keep your character's body on the air and are the most essential. The next pairs of wings would be much smaller, as they wouldn't carry the purpose of keeping you in the sky. The only thing that I could see the secondary (et al) wing sets doing, would be like... say, acting as rudders or wing flaps (like on airplanes) to control the amount of air sliding out from under the wings. With a much more minute purpose than the primary wings, the secondary wings (in real life) would probably be dwarfed and would need to be set away from the main wings so as not to interfere with the vital wing strokes of the primaries. Thus is the reason for smaller, downward pointing secondary wings.

When drawing secondary wings, I usually find myself drawing them to be longer than a dwarfed version of a regular wing. If you noticed the yellow wing in step 2, it was more like a shrunken down version of a regular primary wing --- this is because it was intended to be a primary wing; however, a secondary wing of mine would look a bit different. Shown to the left of the green wings is a framework and general outlining of what a secondary wing would look like if I wanted to draw one. The first oval is further apart from the second and the curves connecting the ovals are more dramatic. Secondary wings can be really fun to draw, so you should try experimenting with them if you want your character to have more than one set of wings.
Creator
3082 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
30 / M / phoenix, az
Offline
Posted 7/24/08
Okay, so we've gone over how to draw wings in general --- but of course, wings move, so they aren't always in the same position. Wings can be positioned in a variety of ways, but it will take time to be able to draw them exactly the way you want them. I would suggest that, once you've got the basics down for drawing wings, you should really go out and search for some cool wing references... say, of an eagle soaring or something cool? Then begin the hard part. Study the wings in the photos, examine their structure during that frame of movement, and then try to draw some wings in that same motion.

It takes practice, as all things do (: so don't be too frustrated if it doesn't come to you at first. I still have troubles with drawing wings a certain way or another, so I'm still learning too --- but hopefully I have been of some help to you!
Member
1460 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / M / hmmm................
Offline
Posted 10/12/08
nice if me i like it very much
4149 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / F / In my own world :3
Offline
Posted 10/20/08
Cool wings really helped me cause I have a character with wings but he's evil so it helped me ALOT! heh,heh... didn't want his wings to look weird...
First  Prev  1  2  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.