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Post Reply drawing tutorials Digital Painting / Spicy Curry Brush
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30 / M / phoenix, az
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Posted 7/24/08 , edited 7/24/08
step 1
I should warn you though, no matter what I say in this brief overview, it's all about you and how much time and effort you want to devote to your art. There's no way I can teach you how to brush exactly like me ( and would you honestly want to if you could? bleh. ) However, I CAN show you a few tricks, make sure you're using the right equipment, and set you out on your own artistic path. Your results will never be the same as mine because you bring your own artistic genius to the table. So keep that in mind, and hopefully this tutorial will give you a few insights you didn't have already.

Okay grasshopper, step one is setting up your tools. Your tools are the MOST important thing, so make sure you do this right. I would hate to see you build a house with a hot glue gun, or paint the Mona Lisa with a fork. Get this part right and you've already kicked 90% of the How-Do-I-Color-That-Way monster's butt.

So... Click that button I've put a red circle around (you'll find it at the top of photoshops toolbar, on the right of the screen), and a much needed brush settings menu will pop up.
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Posted 7/24/08
step 2
In that new menu, click the text I've circled that says "Brush Tip Shape". This is where you'll define the core characteristics of your spicy curry flavored brush. ( by the way, make sure your brush looks round. If it isn't, click the little #1 round brush to the right of the first circle. Or maybe click the 19... whatever. Just keep it round or you'll be hating yourself. )

Set "Hardness" to 100% ( that's right, cause we bad >:U )

Check the "Spacing" box like you see, then
Set spacing to 25% ( that's right, cause we... >_> nvm... )
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Posted 7/24/08
step 3
Next click the button that says "Other Dynamics", and a new set of options will display.

Set "Opacity Jitter" to 0%
"Control" to Pen Pressure (this is for Wacom tablet users, hooha!)

Set "Flow Jitter" to 0%
"Control" to Pen Pressure (this is for Wacom tablet users too :O )
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Posted 7/24/08
step 4
Now you can decide if you want "Wet Edges" and "Airbrush" mode by clicking the two checkboxes I've outlined in the image to the left. The first brush stroke is what "Wet Edges" will look like, and the second is how it will look without. I suggest using wet edges for cloth, buildings, stuff like that. It doesn't work all too well with skin. But honestly, it's up to you and you can change your brush settings at any time while you paint by visiting this menu. I do it constantly.
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Posted 7/24/08
step 5
Last of all, be sure that "Opacity" and "Flow" are both set to 100%. You'll find this option in the menu bar shown below, directly underneath the main application menu. "Mode" should be set to normal for standard painting and the little airbrush icon is a quick toggle button between "Airbrush" modes ( on and off )

I leave it on.
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Posted 7/24/08
step 6
The purpose of step two is defining the shape of your image. You can obviously use lineart to assist in this step, use a sketch (my personal choice), or do this freehand. Just make sure that you (and don't kill me for this) go back to your brush settings and uncheck the "Other Dynamics" check box. By doing this, you'll ensure that the colors you brush will be 100% solid.
If you don't, you'll have the background (in this case white) showing through all over your image, causing a mix of colors that you may not wish for. Unless of course you're pressing REALLY hard on your tablet, or using a mouse.

Once you've complete this step, click "Other Dynamics" back on and procede to the next step.

Side Note: you can see that I used white space to define some lines in this step, as well as a darker shade of yellow in the armpit area to help define shape. Do this too if you think it will help.
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Posted 7/24/08
step 7

Coloring Fabrics:
This step is pretty simple fabric work. The idea here is to "warm up" to the skin. Meaning, get used to using your brush! You'll do a lot better on the face and more detailed parts of the image if you start your day with something more forgiving. So...

> Select a shadow color that is darker than your mid tone (not by much) and start drawing some sloppy shadow areas with your new spicy curry brush. This is a GREAT time to experiment with shape, since mistakes will be easy to cover up. Also, notice how sloppy the edges are? That's how we roll! They'll get cleaned up later, so don't worry too much about them. Just paint son!
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Posted 7/24/08
step 8
Select a darker shadow color, and start accentuating the shadows you've already drawn. I dont like what I see here, but meh. Things change too much during the whole process, so don't fret over stuff, just change it until you like it.

Note: Don't cover up your first shadow section entirely. These two colors need to co-exist next to eachother and make your blending nicer.
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Posted 7/24/08
step 9
Next we start blending these two colors with our spicy curry brush.

August...?
---What is it now? I'm in the middle of a tutorial.
Do you use some sort of blending tool in this step?
---No
Not even a smudge tool? c'mon, you can tell me.
---No, not even a smudge tool.
Why?
---Because I don't like them ya jerk! >:U
Give me a better reason or I won't stop bothering you.
---Fine, fine. I dont use those tools because they don't give me full control over the way the colors blend. I would much rather use my brush, the color selecter toggle, and patience to achieve a happy result. Blending and smudging has it's use, but not in a stage like this.
Sounds like a bunch of bull to me.
---Look at it this way, the more you use your spicy cury brush, the better you'll get at it. So use it every chance you have, and you'll become a VERY brushy artist... How's that for an answer?
I'm gonna smudge it anyway >:Y
---Jerk!
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Posted 7/24/08 , edited 7/24/08
step 10
Note: Okay, I mentioned the "color select toggle" in that dialog up there. Now here's an explanation:

Photoshop has tools that apply color, right? Since Adobe is a bunch of geniuses, they've provided us with shortcuts to RELATED tools while we're using any one of the tools in their program. In this case, we're using the brush, right? So, while using the brush press the "Alt" key on your keyboard. Do you notice that your brush changed into a color picker? You can select colors with it now. Let go of "Alt" and your brush is back to normal with a NEW color. Now let's share a moment of silence for the programmers that died to make this shortcut happen =___=;

Additionally, PRESS THE SPACE BAR HOLYCRAP! This turns any tool you're using (except text) into the "pan" tool, allowing you to click and drag the screen, instead of using those clumsy scroll bars. Use these two shortcuts often and love Adobe for providing them. They'll make your life so much richer.

ANOTHER helpful note, press the [ and ] (bracket) keys on your keyboard to increase or reduce the size of your brush.
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Posted 7/24/08
step 11
After some brushing fun (maybe half an hours worth?), you end up with something like this. You can see that I finally added some dark black brush strokes, some highlights, and my all time favorite: GRAYS in the shadows-omg-somany-peoplehate-them!!! But do as you please until you're happy with the way your colors blend. Don't expect them to look like mine though, as I've said before every artist is different.

And viola! You're done coloring a bit of cloth :P
But don't stop here, re-color the same cloth over and over if you want the additional practice ^^

Now stop staring at her butt! Rude... >_>
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Posted 7/24/08
step 12
This is the final step of the tutorial, and possibly one of the most useful, since we'll be taking on the difficult task of coloring a face. You should all know however, that this is NOT the first version of her face that I've done. The previous three versions SUCKED. So, why am I telling you this? I dont want you to think you should get it right on your first attempt. It's difficult to work without lines, so go easy on yourself.

Okay, this is the tough part, and this is where I botched up the other 3 versions:
Take your spicy curry brush and draw draw draw. Try to make the face as cute as possibe, without spending much time defining any one spot. If you spend too much time committing yourself to one area, you'll be too apprehensive in the next stage. So do yourself a favor, keep it sketchy, and try to make your character look as cute or handsome as possible.
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Posted 7/24/08
step 13
Now add your first round of shadows, much like you did in the cloth step above. This will help you define the shape of the face again, without committing too much to any one shape.

Note: See how her eyebrows are TOTALLY different now? I also changed her lips, nose, adjusted the eyes, filled the eyes with color (because it's fun), and generally manipulated the image. You should be doing this too. Add your first shadows, darker outlines, do some pushing, some pulling, some swinging with a baseball bat, and GET THE FACE LOOKING GOOD! If it doesn't look good, wipe the whole face out and start over. Because you DON'T want to procede to the next step unless you're happy with the way your characters face is looking.
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Posted 7/24/08
step 14
Now that you're happy with the face and your inital shadows, add a few darker shadows and continue defining the overall shape.

You can see that I did the following:
1. placed a darker overall outline on the edges
2. defined the chin line more
3. darkened underneath her eyebrows
4. defined the lips a bit more
5. darkened the shadows from the hair
6. etc..? I'm sure there's more. Just keep at it until you're happy with the way your shadows are coming together. Remember though, you're not completely covering up the shadows you did in the previous step. Much like the cloth part of this tutorial, you'll be blending with them.
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Posted 7/24/08 , edited 7/24/08
step 15
While the changes in this next part are very subtle, you can still kinda make them out. What you'll want to do is add very slight highlights. You can see that I've added them on the upper portion of her (screen left) cheek, on her nose, a bit on her chin, and of course her forehead. The angle you're working with may not match this one, but you get the idea. Do some SLIGHT overall highlighting. Too much highlighting at this point will work against you, so make sure you're taking it easy. When you step away, she should be looking nicely rendered overall.
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