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Post Reply drawing tutorials Digital Painting / Spicy Curry Brush
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30 / M / phoenix, az
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Posted 7/24/08
step 16
Now that you're a soft highlighting master, it's time to throw in some sharper lighting. This is all a matter of preference of course, but I added sharper yellow highlights, and a specular shine to her cheek and nose. I did this because I'm a sucker for shiny looking skin in anime. Regardless of what you want in your own art however, this is your last (ish) step, beyond your final touchups, cleanups, and definition.

As you can see, I've also defined the lips in this step to make them look more natural, added some darker lines here and there, and COMPLETELY forgot to shade the whites of her eyes. O_<
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Posted 7/24/08
step 17
A few extra bits of help:

A note on lips: I find that "outlines" are usually too much, and "inlines" (for lack of a better word) work better. So let your colors do the "outlining" or shape defining on the outer edges, and your darkest color do the "inlining", or lines on the inner edges. This will give the lips a soft kissable look, opposed to the INYOFACE look of heavily outlined lips. (Note to Pamela Anderson: please brush your own lips this way. The world will be a better place for it.)

A note on eyes: switch your brush "Mode" to COLOR DODGE! Then select your base color to brush with, and within about 3 strokes you should have a richly colored eye. Just make sure that you reduce the size of your brush with each stroke, and press lightly. Also, be careful not to overdo it. Dodging color can be a nasty mess if you go too crazy with it. And don't foget to switch your "Mode" back to NORMAL when you're finished with them!
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Posted 7/24/08
step 18
Well that's about it from me. Hopefully this tutorial helped you out a bit, and wasn't too much of a bore to read. Don't hesitate to show me your progress, as I would really enjoy seeing how people advance with, or alter my spicy curry brush technique for their own use. Most of all, have fun and don't forget that you've ALWAYS got to practice!!! Nothing comes easy, so try this technique again and again and again and ... you get the point. You'll get better each time you do! -augustc4

Now get something to wash down the spicy.
Your breath stinks son! *o*
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Posted 7/25/08
painting #2
step 1
This actually might be more of a "process" piece, but hopefully I will be able to cover certain aspects about digital painting "how to's" of which I hope some of you will find useful. Like most tutorials, I would like to remind you that this lesson does not necessarily mean I'm doing things the "right" way. This is merely my personal style. But what I wish to achieve is for you to have a better understanding about different stages of digital painting, lighting, color use, brush strokes, etc.

With that said, let's begin shall we?

What I Use
1. Photoshop (any version can work but for this tutorial I use CS)
2. A tablet and stylus
3. Snacks (optional)

Step1:
As most artworks start off, they begin with a certain concept or idea in mind. At the same time, there are other fantastic artworks that just spring to life from simple doodles. With this piece I already have a picture in mind. Now I'll try to sketch out my idea. Sketches do not necessarily mean that they have to look like finished pieces. Try relaxing and just go with the flow.

After opening a New Document, I then add a NEW LAYER on which I make my sketch. It's always a good idea to get references. Referencing can teach you a lot about anatomy, poses, lighting, etc. I referenced the pose from a picture I found which is pretty similar to what I envisioned in my head. I just added a bit of my own style.
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Posted 7/25/08
step 2
I keep working on the sketch, adding details and trying to form an overall design. At this stage, my sketches are really messy. Most of the time my sketches don't even look like the finished piece. I tend to adjust/add/subtract certain parts as I go along.

I wanted her hair to come out from random places, giving her a bit of that tribal look, so I decided to sketch her somesort of bandaged crown.
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30 / M / phoenix, az
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Posted 7/25/08
step 3
added another layer and TRACED the sketch to get a cleaner looking piece than got rid of the sketch layer. Sometimes I keep my sketch layers, but bear in mind the more layers your file has, the bigger the file size will be. This can result in some nasty consequences if your computer can't handle the load. The lines do not really matter since I'm going to paint over them anyways, but this just makes things easier to look at.

At this point I jump ahead of myself and try to think of how I want her clothes to look like. I think of what texture, how fit it will look and all of that stuff. This helps me choose certain colors and figure out how to execute them during the painting process.
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Posted 7/25/08
step 4
Shadow Play

Determining your light source and adding shadows can drastically enhance a piece. I call this shadow play, wherein I basically play around adding shading and shadow.

Again I add a NEW LAYER beneath the LINEART LAYER and started brushing in the shadows. This gives me a relatively good idea of how and where I can lay the paint later.

Coloring shadow can vary. Sometimes shadows tend to be reflective color, bouncing off from another object (especially shiny ones). A good example is to have a red shiny Christmas ball and hold it up to your face. You will notice that the tint in your skin has that same reflective red color coming from the decorative ball.
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Posted 7/25/08
step 5
Remember that little ball they made you draw and shade in art class to explain the basics of shading? It's very much applicable to anything that has depth and shape.
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Posted 7/25/08
step 6
Sometimes I would also execute what I refer to as "global lighting". This is common with reflective surfaces like a white floor or table. Notice how the shading changes beginning from where the light hits the strongest? It changes intensity as it gets up to it's darkest point, then slightly changes back to a lighter shade. This is because the reflective surface of the floor reflects back some of the light onto the bottom of the ball.
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Posted 7/25/08
step 7
Now we're actually going to get started on the painting process. Here I've placed a bit of color on the shadows and added more on the highlighted parts of her body. It would also be wise to have a ready color palette for the skin tones. If not, what you can do is reference from magazine photos and such. Skin tones vary, depending on people's genes and race. Asians tend to have that hint of a yellow in their skin, caucasians are generally light skinned with a bit of some reddish/purple tine from underneath the skin, and Pacific Islanders tend to have the brownish tone. It all depends on what type of skin you want your character to have. Heck, I used blue skins a couple of times before
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Posted 7/25/08
step 8
"What the?! What heppened to the lines?!?"

Easy Grasshopper, I merely reduced the opacity on the lineart's layer so it wouldn't be as distracting. This also helps me in adjusting certain shades in color for the shadows.

I also added the shadow play for her clothes (which I should have done earlier). If your preference is to add another layer with every element you color, it's up to you. for me, I usually don't worry about it too much since I paint over everything most of the time anyways. On occasion I do use multimple layers, but like I said, this only gives my computer a harder time. And the last thing I need is my computer to have another stroke before I SAVE >_<

When I'm satisfied with what I have, I merge the layers to reduce the stress (it seems to work for me at least). It's most unlikely that I'll open up the file again and recolor certain parts anyway.
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Posted 7/25/08
step 9
Before we go further, let me show you my two most commonly used brushes:

Image 1:
My Paint Brush setting
Opacity jitter and flow are set on "Pen Pressure" in the "Other Dynamics" tab. Most of the time I use this setting especially if I want a more solid/opaque painted look.

Image 2:
My Air Brush setting
Opacity jitter and flow are set to "Pen Pressure" in the "Other Dynamics" tab. This one I use if I wanted a more soft look. This is also good for blending in gradiant colors.
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Posted 7/25/08
step 10
I start to do a bit of detailing on her nose and lips.
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Posted 7/25/08
step 11
At this point, I start adding bits and pieces of details on her skin and I roughly lay out the colors for her clothes. I want her clothes to have that bit of a rubbery texture to them so I settled for a greyish tone. Some people can tell that I love earthy tones, especially for clothes. She kind look like the Statue of Liberty right now :P

I'm not coloring the hair for now. That will come in the later part of this tutorial
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Posted 7/25/08 , edited 7/25/08
step 12
I begin painting more details on different places. Usually I start with the face and work my way down to the clothes.

It's usually hard to think of nice color combinations for clothes but I found that using earthy tones (browns, reds, yellows, greens, etc) are easy to match.
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