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Do Go Around Saying Things In Japanese?!
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19 / M / Tiphares
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Posted 10/6/12
No.
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26 / M / US
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Posted 10/6/12 , edited 10/6/12
To my sister, yeah. Other than that nope. I know how it felt listening to a language for half a year not knowing what was right to say in response and what was wrong so I don't put that on others. However!!!
If a person asked me to speak Japanese so they can hear what it's like, that's another story.
krozoa 
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21 / M / bremerton watshin...
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Posted 10/6/12
im trying to learn buts it tough to teach your self a language haha
krozoa 
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21 / M / bremerton watshin...
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Posted 10/6/12
it would be great if anyone had any tips for learning japanese
Posted 10/6/12
Nope, since i dont talk much.
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M / Nestled between E...
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Posted 10/6/12 , edited 10/6/12

krozoa wrote:

it would be great if anyone had any tips for learning japanese


The biggest tip I have for anyone who wants to learn Japanese is learn how to write, read and speak simultaneously.
DO NOT PUT OFF KANJI! Kanji are actually really friendly, just horribly misunderstood. Learn the "alphabet" first.
Once you know Hiragana and Katakana, you can now write any Japanese word, now learn how natives write them.
(i.e. Using a careful combination of Kanji and Hiragana. Katakana are mainly used for foreign terms or loanwords).

Practice, practice, practice! Watching anime or film raws is good for getting a feel for how the language is spoken.
You'll also gradually be able to follow the things that people are saying due to familiarity. (This is how you answer back).
While it's true that you cannot learn Japanese from subbed anime, it is not IMPOSSIBLE to pick up some common
expressions, phrases and names, of course.

(The main reason you cannot learn Japanese from subbed anime is because anime uses a casual form,
when humble is expected,and anime generally does not stop to teach you, it will just go on at the pace
that it is meant to, because it is made for natives, and many subs are generated based on the closest
logical thing for something to mean, but not necessarily what it actually does. We, as western viewers,
cannot forget that the translation of any language is usually more of an art than a practice, because a wide
array of nuances that would convey perfectly in their native tongue
simply DO NOT translate into English in any way whatsoever).

Best of all, get some good books on the subject.
There are some great grammar books and the Genki series is perfect for beginners.
Once you learn some Kanji and how to use them, you'll already stop using the "Hiragana only" approach of Genki I,
for sure, though. (Kanji were originally adapted to make the writing process shorter and easier to distinguish,
given many Japanese characters look similar).

Kanji are a two-way street. Sometimes it is easier to write with Kanji
because they only have one or two meaning/readings. Other times...
not so easy. There are many Kanji which not only carry 10 or more meanings, but as many as 3-5 readings.
That's where memorization comes into play. It's all about getting the 2-3 most common reading/meanings
for each character like that. There are other grammatical pitfalls such as conjugation of verbs and adjectives,
the different tenses (past tense is the trickiest part of the Japanese language), etc.

At the end of the day, the goal of becoming fluent in any language is to be
able to have a thought process of one who speaks it. If you can think in Japanese,
actively knowing terms, Kanji and pronunciations of vocabularythat you are familiar with
and have an idea of how much you want to learn, "I'd really like to become fluent in Japanese,"
then you're that much closer to it. Kanji are daunting, though, and are usually the biggest reason
why many people seem to "fizzle out" with Japanese studies. Put the fact that you need to know
at least 1,945 common use and as many as 900+additional for names in the back of your mind.
(Also, ignore that in order to read a Japanese newspaper and most higher level books well you need to know ~2,600).

When you get stuck (and you will), consult Tae Kim's Learning Japanese, Denshi Jisho, Tangorin and other resources.
jisho.org
tangorin.com


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19 / M / Sweden
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Posted 10/6/12
I use to mutter "mendokuse" all the time...

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F / United States
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Posted 10/6/12
Nope~
But when I think, I insert phrases here and there using my limited Japanese.
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Posted 10/6/12

iHinaku wrote:

Nope~
But when I think, I insert phrases here and there using my limited Japanese.


That's a good way to tell that you're at least retaining something.
No matter what if you think it, you're thinking about it, wouldn't you say?
Giving thought to something often keeps it fresh in your mind. ^^
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16 / F / Milkshake Planet
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Posted 10/6/12
Nope.
I don't even know japanese that much
Besides it would be kinda akward to say japanese in public >.<
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20 / M / Florida
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Posted 10/6/12
I know some Japanese, but I'm nowhere near fluent. I don't generally speak it around other people.
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30 / M / NE
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Posted 10/6/12
Its starting to creep into my vocab, slowly
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M / New Mexico USA
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Posted 10/6/12


Great post

But yeah I say simple things like "nani o shiteru, bakayarou" a lot at work to let off steam. They just look at me funny and I'mm ok with that. I say Ittekimasu, Itterasshai, tadaima and okaerinasai a lot when leaving my house or when someone else leaves. Just little things like that. Haha and also Daihen and shimatta! chikoku da!!
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Posted 10/6/12 , edited 10/6/12

Keiek5 wrote:


DeliriumOxide wrote:




Great post

But yeah I say simple things like "nani o shiteru, bakayarou" a lot at work to let off steam. They just look at me funny and I'mm ok with that. I say Ittekimasu, Itterasshai, tadaima and okaerinasai a lot when leaving my house or when someone else leaves. Just little things like that. Haha and also Daihen and shimatta! chikoku da!!


Hmmm. I prefer "oroka" (愚か) or "bonkura" (盆暗) to baka or bakayarou. After all, "yarou" is just an intensifier.

Ittekimasu is for the one who is leaving,
Itterasshai is for someone who is walking into somewhere (store, etc - "Welcome"),
Tadaima ("Just now") is for the one who is announcing they are home, and Okaeri
or Okaerinasai is for one receiving a guest. Generally they would say beforehand
or reply with "Ojamashimasu," if they aren't sure what's going on at the time, of which
I'm certain you're familiar with as well. I really like the idiomatic expression
"Doitsumokoitsumo," ("everyone") personally.

Since it plays on the unusual "they" forms "Aitsu" and "Koitsu" (Aitsura/Koitsura),
and uses the odd-form "who," "doitsu," instead of the usual "dare."

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43 / M / Canada
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Posted 10/7/12
Since they mostly teach formal business Japanese over here, I found it useful to hear the casual forms in anime and Jdrama. You learn all the cool insulting pronouns and superlatives...

Once you know enough Japanese to hear the words and separate out subjects, objects, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, particles and so on, anime and Jdrama can be used to learn new words. Until then it is just a stream where you occasionally recognize the odd word.

Unscripted talk shows have a more natural speed. With a script, anime, drama and newscasts are unnaturally fast and can be more difficult to understand than real conversations. Anime and drama let you cheat by watching so radio shows can be better.

The hardest part of the JLPT, for me anyways, was the listening test. Anime and Jdrama dialogues are very similar to the way they play a short scenario and then ask some questions. Some JLPT seiyuu probably do other voice acting.
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